Current Courses

The Classics Department offers courses in Greek, Latin, and classical civilization. See everything that Classics has to offer in the Course Catalog.

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Classics Courses 

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Medical Greek and Latin

CLAS 190 - Loar, Matthew P.

This course is designed to teach students about the Greek and Latin roots relevant for the study of modern medical terminology. By the end of the course, students will be able to (1) define some of the most common Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, and bases found in medical terminology, (2) recognize the Greek and Latin roots in that terminology, and (3) infer the meaning of both familiar and unfamiliar medical terminology based on their knowledge of those Greek and Latin roots. This course does not count toward the CLAS major or minor.

Greek Art & Archaeology

CLAS 200 - Laughy, Michael H.

An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period

CLAS 203 - Crotty, Kevin M.

While epic, drama, history and philosophy trace their beginnings in many ways to ancient Greece, they are not simply different literary genres, but each offers a distinctive model of what it means to be a human being.  In this course, we will read, discuss and write about poetic works by Homer, the tragedians and comic playwrights, as well as philosophical works by Plato and Aristotle. We will discuss the different perspectives of these diverse genres, and the light they shed on such perennially pertinent questions as responsibility, power, violence, justice, and gender.

Directed Individual Study

CLAS 403 - Laughy, Michael H.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Spring 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Augustan Era

CLAS 204 - Loar, Matthew P.

An interdisciplinary course taught in English, using the tools of literature, history and art to examine a specific, complicated, and pivotally important period in the evolution of western culture, focused on the literary. Readings from the poets predominate (Virgil's Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphosis, selections from Horace, Propertius, Tibullus and other poems of Ovid) and also including readings from ancient historians dealing with Augustus and the major events of his period (e.g., Suetonius, Plutarch, and Tacitus on such topics as Actium and problems of succession). The topic for each lecture is illustrated with slides of works of art and architecture from the period. Selections from historians and from material remains are chosen according to intersection points with the literature.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295A - Parson, Vergil

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2021, CLAS 295A-01: Topics in Classical Civilization: Nature and the Environment in Antiquity (3).  How did people in the ancient world conceive of nature from a philosophical, religious, and scientific standpoint? What attitudes did they hold towards animals and other forms of life? How did they shape the world around them through practices such as agriculture, mining, water management, and deforestation? Did they share our modern concerns about the use and conservation of natural spaces? Students in this course investigate these questions using literature, art, and artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean world (primarily Greece and Rome) as well as works by contemporary scholars. Readings are in English, with the opportunity to read portions of some texts in Greek or Latin, if desired, by students with prior knowledge of these languages. (HU) Parson.

Winter 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Pompeii

CLAS 338 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

The site of ancient Pompeii presents a thriving Roman town of the first century AD, virtually frozen in time by the devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In this course, we examine Pompeii's archaeological remains-public buildings, domestic architecture, painting, artifacts, inscriptions, and graffiti-in order to reconstruct the life of the town. We also consider religion, games and entertainment, politics, and the structure of Roman society.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Latin Courses

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 101 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

An introduction to Latin language and Roman culture. Students will learn about the structure of language, and will focus on the acquisition of Latin vocabulary and grammar. 

Intermediate Latin

LATN 201 - Dance, Caleb M.

Reading selections from some or all of the following: Cato, Nepos, Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, and Varro. Emphasis on style and syntax, along with the political and social background of the later Republican period.

Letters of Cicero and Pliny

LATN 310 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

This course examines different styles and purposes of letter writing in the Roman world, focusing on the historically revealing letters of Cicero and Pliny, but also including samples from the Epistles of Horace and Seneca, as well as a few "fictional" letters by Ovid.

Spring 2021

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 102 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A continuation of the materials and methods in LATN 101 with emphasis on syntax.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Dance, Caleb M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Roman Elegy

LATN 328 - Dance, Caleb M.

This course explores the diverse genre of Roman elegy through a close reading of extensive portions of the poetry of Propertius, Tibullus, Ovid, and other writers. Themes to be discussed include different ideas about love, women in elegiac poetry, and the relationship between the poet/lover and his wider social and political environment. The course also addresses the place of elegy in Greek and Roman poetic traditions.

Directed Individual Study

LATN 401 - Dance, Caleb M.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

LATN 403 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Greek Courses

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 101 - Laughy, Michael H.

An introduction to the ancient Greeks through a study of their language and material culture. This course focuses upon the essentials of grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction to Classical archaeology, with a focus on ancient Athens. This course is a prerequisite to GR 102, which focuses upon the language and ancient history of the Greeks. Note: GR 202, taking in the second year of language study, satisfies the FL FDR.

Intermediate Ancient Greek

GR 201 - Laughy, Michael H.

Readings in Greek prose.

Tragedy

GR 301 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A study of the Greek dramatists through close textual analysis; readings from ancient and modern theatrical writers and theories.

Spring 2021

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 102 - Dance, Caleb M.

A continuation of GR 101. Further work on grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction of ancient Greek history, with a focus upon the Persia, Athens, and Sparta.

Homer

GR 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the language of Homer and to the Greek oral and written tradition; a reading of the Iliad or the Odyssey in Greek and in translation.