Current Courses

The Classics Department offers courses in Greek, Latin, and classical civilization. See everything that Classics has to offer in the Course Catalog.

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Classics Courses 

Winter 2023

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Classical Civilization: Africa and the Ancient Mediterranean

CLAS 295C - Laughy, Michael H.

For centuries, "Greek was an African language." Stanley Burnstein. The Mediterranean Sea has long connected the peoples of Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, promoting contacts and cultural exchanges throughout this "liquid continent." In this course, we focus upon ancient Africa's place within the wider Mediterranean. Central to our discussion is the history, literature, art, institutions, and economies of North Africa, including Egypt. But no less important are the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, such as the Ethiopians, whom we are told fought on the side of the Trojans in the Trojan War, and were among the favorites of the gods.

Directed Individual Study: Ancient Mediterranean History

CLAS 403A - Laughy, Michael H.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.

Fall 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Roman History

CLAS 111 - Chalmers, Matthew J.

Same as HIST 111. The course covers a long chronological span, from the period of the city's prehistoric foundations to the final years of the western Empire in the fifth century CE. The aim of the course is not only to treat the major political and social events of Roman history according to the annalistic tradition, but also to give special attention to various cultural norms and practices, the structure of Roman society and its institutions, and the interactions between different social groups in each period. Central to our study of these themes will be a consideration of the wide range of primary evidence available to ancient historians and an understanding of the methodological problems encountered in reconstructing the history of any society.

FS: First-Year Seminar: Blasts from the Past

CLAS 180A - Dance, Caleb M.

Topic varies by term.

FS: First-Year Seminar: Gateway to the Ancient Greek and Roman World

CLAS 180B - Brobeck, Emma

Who were the ancient Greeks and Romans? This course introduces students to Greek and Roman ways of understanding the world and their place within it. Students will learn broadly about the history and literature of ancient Greece and Rome, while readings will focus on the theme of community building. Topics will include historical and material developments of ancient cities, their legal and social worlds, myth, gender, citizenship, and ethnicity. Likewise, students will read a variety of ancient sources, including epic, drama, poetry, historiography, and letters. Throughout the course students will practice different methods of analysis used in the Humanities and will also develop skills in interpreting ancient texts in translation.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Topics in Classical Civilization: Race and Ethnicity in the Ancient World

CLAS 295B - Chalmers, Matthew J.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - / Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Spring 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

STUDY ABROAD:ROME/ANCIENT ITAL

CLAS 288 - Dance, Caleb M. / Loar, Matthew P.


Latin Courses

Winter 2023

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 102 - Brobeck, Emma

A continuation of the materials and methods in LATN 101 with emphasis on syntax.

Practicum: Latin in the Schools

LATN 200 - Dance, Caleb M.

A service-learning course in which W&L students design a curriculum and teach beginning Latin in the local elementary school.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Dance, Caleb M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Lyric Poetry: Horace and Catullus

LATN 321 - Dance, Caleb M.

Lyric Poetry: Horace and Catullus

Fall 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 101 - Brobeck, Emma

An introduction to Latin language and Roman culture. Students will learn about the structure of language, and will focus on the acquisition of Latin vocabulary and grammar.

Intermediate Latin

LATN 201 - Dance, Caleb M.

Reading selections from some or all of the following: Cato, Nepos, Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, and Varro. Emphasis on style and syntax, along with the political and social background of the later Republican period.

Topics in Latin Literature: Early Christian Literature

LATN 395C - Crotty, Kevin M.

In this course, we begin with some texts that explore Roman reactions to the rise of Christianity. We then focus on some of the most interesting early texts exploring the experience of early Christians. In particular, we will read the prison diary of St. Perpetua, and selections from Augustine’s Confessions.

Spring 2022

We do not offer any courses this term.


Greek Courses

Winter 2023

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 102 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A continuation of GR 101. Further work on grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction of ancient Greek history, with a focus upon the Persia, Athens, and Sparta.

Homer

GR 202 - Dance, Caleb M.

An introduction to the language of Homer and to the Greek oral and written tradition; a reading of the Iliad or the Odyssey in Greek and in translation.

Topics in Advanced Greek Literature: Fantastic Journeys: Travel and Myth in Ancient Greece.

GR 395C - Crotty, Kevin M.

In this course, we explore ancient accounts of travels in unfamiliar lands. Readings from Homer's Odyssey, Herodotus, and Lucian.

Fall 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 101 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the ancient Greeks through a study of their language and material culture. This course focuses upon the essentials of grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction to Classical archaeology, with a focus on ancient Athens.

Intermediate Ancient Greek

GR 201 - Laughy, Michael H.

Readings in Greek prose.

Topics in Greek Literature: The Use and Abuse of Attic Orators

GR 395A - Laughy, Michael H.

What is the significance of Attic orators as sources for Athenian history? Throughreadings in the original Greek of the orators themselves, we study the ways in which Attic orators have been used as sources for social, political, and economic history, and the historiographical paradox that these orators constitute for many modern scholars.

Spring 2022

We do not offer any courses this term.