Current Courses

The Classics Department offers courses in Greek, Latin, and classical civilization. See everything that Classics has to offer in the Course Catalog.

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Classics Courses 

Spring 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Supervised Study Abroad: Rome and Ancient Italy

CLAS 288 - Dance, Caleb M. / Loar, Matthew P.

This course traces the growth of Rome and Roman civilization from its modest beginnings to its glory during the Republic and Empire. Lectures and readings prepare students for daily visits to sites, excavations, monuments and museums in Rome and its environs, and to locations in the Bay of Naples area.

Winter 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Sex, Gender and Power in Ancient Literature

CLAS 210 - Dance, Caleb M.

Open to all students without prerequisite. An examination of literature in various genres (poetry, philosophy, drama, and history) in an attempt to understand the diverse ways in which Greeks and Romans conceived of gender identity, gender expression, and sexuality. We also interrogate the power dynamics that underpinned these conceptions. Readings include primary sources from antiquity (e.g., Homer, Euripides, Plato, Plautus, Livy, Ovid) as well as secondary sources that explore sex, gender, and power in both ancient and modern contexts.  The course examines several influential works composed in Greek and Latin between the 8th century BCE and the 1st century CE. Alongside poems and philosophical writings that were originally conceived of as literary projects, we also examine plays, historical works, and even some inscriptions, all of which come down to the present as "literature", although many may not have been conceived as such. The boundaries of "literature" is an ongoing topic of inquiry throughout the term.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, CLAS 295A-01: Topics: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic (3). This course investigates the Roman Republic from its foundation after the overthrow of the last Roman king to its transformation into the Roman empire.  Topics covered will include the Conflict of the Orders, Rome's early expansion, the Punic Wars, the reforms of the Gracchi brothers, and the careers of powerful generals seeking to dominate the state like Marius, Sulla, and Julius Caesar.  Students will read and analyze some of the most important historical sources from the era, including Livy, Polybius, Plutarch, Sallust, Caesar, and Cicero. (HU) Halsted.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, CLAS 295A-02: Topics: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic? (3). This course investigates the Roman Republic from its foundation after the overthrow of the last Roman king to its transformation into the Roman empire.  Topics covered will include the Conflict of the Orders, Rome's early expansion, the Punic Wars, the reforms of the Gracchi brothers, and the careers of powerful generals seeking to dominate the state like Marius, Sulla, and Julius Caesar.  Students will read and analyze some of the most important historical sources from the era, including Livy, Polybius, Plutarch, Sallust, Caesar, and Cicero. (HU) Halsted.

 

Law, Litigation, and Justice in the Ancient World

CLAS 341 - Crotty, Kevin M.

This course studies justice and law in the ancient world by looking at Greek and Roman philosophical texts about the nature of justice and law, and by considering actual legal cases from the ancient world. The course aims to show how litigation and theory mutually correct and inform one another, while also showing the inherent and continuing interest of ancient thought about law and justice. Students hear lectures, engage in in-class discussion, participate in an on-line discussion, moderated by the instructor, and write two research papers.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Medical Greek and Latin

CLAS 190 - Loar, Matthew P.

This course is designed to teach students about the Greek and Latin roots relevant for the study of modern medical terminology. By the end of the course, students will be able to (1) define some of the most common Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, and bases found in medical terminology, (2) recognize the Greek and Latin roots in that terminology, and (3) infer the meaning of both familiar and unfamiliar medical terminology based on their knowledge of those Greek and Latin roots. This course does not count toward the CLAS major or minor.

Greek Art & Archaeology

CLAS 200 - Laughy, Michael H.

An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period

CLAS 203 - Crotty, Kevin M.

While epic, drama, history and philosophy trace their beginnings in many ways to ancient Greece, they are not simply different literary genres, but each offers a distinctive model of what it means to be a human being.  In this course, we will read, discuss and write about poetic works by Homer, the tragedians and comic playwrights, as well as philosophical works by Plato and Aristotle. We will discuss the different perspectives of these diverse genres, and the light they shed on such perennially pertinent questions as responsibility, power, violence, justice, and gender.

Directed Individual Study

CLAS 403 - Laughy, Michael H.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Latin Courses

Spring 2022

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 102 - Laughy, Michael H.

A continuation of the materials and methods in LATN 101 with emphasis on syntax.

Practicum: Latin in the Schools

LATN 200 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

A service-learning course in which W&L students design a curriculum and teach beginning Latin in the local elementary school. May be repeated for up to three degree credits.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Introduction to Latin Poetry

LATN 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Virgil's Aeneid

LATN 325 - Dance, Caleb M.

Virgil's Aeneid

Directed Individual Research

LATN 421 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Research

LATN 421 - Dance, Caleb M.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 101 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

An introduction to Latin language and Roman culture. Students will learn about the structure of language, and will focus on the acquisition of Latin vocabulary and grammar. 

Intermediate Latin

LATN 201 - Dance, Caleb M.

Reading selections from some or all of the following: Cato, Nepos, Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, and Varro. Emphasis on style and syntax, along with the political and social background of the later Republican period.

Letters of Cicero and Pliny

LATN 310 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

This course examines different styles and purposes of letter writing in the Roman world, focusing on the historically revealing letters of Cicero and Pliny, but also including samples from the Epistles of Horace and Seneca, as well as a few "fictional" letters by Ovid.

Directed Individual Study

LATN 403 - Dance, Caleb M.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Greek Courses

Spring 2022

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 102 - Laughy, Michael H.

A continuation of GR 101. Further work on grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction of ancient Greek history, with a focus upon the Persia, Athens, and Sparta.

Homer

GR 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the language of Homer and to the Greek oral and written tradition; a reading of the Iliad or the Odyssey in Greek and in translation.

The Greek Philosophers

GR 302 - Laughy, Michael H.

Readings in Greek and English from the corpus of Greek philosophical works, including the pre-Socratic fragments, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics and Epicureans.

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 101 - Laughy, Michael H.

An introduction to the ancient Greeks through a study of their language and material culture. This course focuses upon the essentials of grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction to Classical archaeology, with a focus on ancient Athens. This course is a prerequisite to GR 102, which focuses upon the language and ancient history of the Greeks. Note: GR 202, taking in the second year of language study, satisfies the FL FDR.

Intermediate Ancient Greek

GR 201 - Laughy, Michael H.

Readings in Greek prose.

Tragedy

GR 301 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A study of the Greek dramatists through close textual analysis; readings from ancient and modern theatrical writers and theories.