Resources for International Students

The Office of Career and Professional Development at Washington and Lee University has not vetted any of the internship and volunteer opportunity listings on this page and makes no representations or guarantees regarding any of the listed opportunities. It is the responsibility of students and alumni to do their own due diligence when applying for and accepting any of these opportunities.

Quick Links: General Career Advice | FAQs | Career Resources | Scholarships | On-Campus Resources

General Career Advice

  • Understand your protections against discrimination: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, or sex which includes sexual/romantic orientation and gender identity/expression. The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination based on disability. The Pregnancy Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination based on pregnancy. Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act prohibits discrimination based on genetic information.
  • Know your rights: Understand the questions employers can and cannot ask you as you proceed through the hiring process. Review a sample of allowable and prohibited questions here. Focus the conversation on your skills and abilities and what you bring to the workplace.
  • Seek advice on professional options early: During your first year, schedule appointments with:
    • The International Student Advisor, Hunter Swanson, hswanson@wlu.edu, to understand the visa application and process; also see the Center for International Education.
    • Career and Professional Development Advisors to begin your career exploration, research interests, industries, and careers (Handshake).
  • Explore resources in your home country: Research employers who may have offices or connections in your home country. Contact your embassy for employment contacts.
  • Turn obstacles into opportunities: Do not let your status as an international student hold you back from opportunities. Reflect on the unique qualities you offer and why you would be an asset to the company. Practice telling your story and articulating your strengths so you can persuasively convey your value to employers. To help you get started, some general qualities international students often offer include multi-lingual abilities, flexibility, adaptability, self-sufficiency, and multi-cultural mindset.
  • Research global resources outside of the U.S.: There are many fantastic opportunities outside the United States. You can do research on a fellowship or scholarship, work at an international office of a U.S.-based company, or work for an international company in a different country.

FAQs

Should I include my visa status on my resume?

  • No. Your educational and employment background may suggest your immigration status, but your visa status and nationality should not be included on your resume.

When should I reveal my international student status?

  • There is no easy answer to this process. Although employers cannot ask about your status, this is a topic you can raise in an interview. It is important not to wait too long. Be prepared to explain your work authorization and documents you need. Don't wait until the job offer to tell the employer, make sure they know beforehand.

Where can I find visa informatoin?

  • Visit the U.S. Department of State for information on working, studying, or traveling abroad. The State Department also provides country specific details regarding safety and local laws.

Career Resources

  • CareerShift - Search for internship and job opportunities by country and state, job type, industry and keyword; contains H1B data
  • IASTE - The International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience is open to degree level science, engineering, technology and applied arts students in the second year of study and above
  • Cturtle - Jobs and internships for international students
  • International Organizations - Georgetown University resource of international organizations covered under the International Organizations Immunities Act (1945), which often provide full-time international employees with G-4 status
  • International Student - Provides career resources and tips along with a student job search center
  • LatPro - Job listings for Latino professionals or bilingual Spanish-speakers
  • List of recent top employers for OPT students
  • My Visa Jobs - Find employers in US and Canada that hire international employees and alumni. Search for employers by industry or location who have sponsored H-1B visas (Located in the 'Search Visa Solution' section)
  • Saludos - A site for Hispanic students; search for the employer of your choice, post your resume, and apply
  • The Institute of International Education - The IIE has partnered with many global organizations to offer scholarships, fellowships, and academic opportunities to people around the world
  • Uniworld - Search for companies with branches within US and abroad (subscription required)

Scholarships

On-Campus Resources