Major Requirements

2020 - 2021 Catalog

Business Administration major leading to a BS degree

A major in business administration leading to a Bachelor of Science requires at least 46 credits total, including at least 24 credits in business administration and 19 credits not in business administration, as follows:

  1. ACCT 100 or both ACCT 201 and 202;
  2. ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102;
  3. INTR 201 or Information Technology Literacy Proficiency (see information below)
  4. BUS 211, 217, 221; INTR 202
  5. BUS 345, 346 or 348
  6. BUS 398 or 399
  7. Business Administration electives: at least nine additional credits, chosen from Business Administration courses numbered 300 or above, but excluding BUS 401 and 402.
  8. Non-Business Administration electives: nine credits chosen from the following:
    ACCT: all courses numbered above 202
    ARTH 453
    ARTS 217, 218, 220, 224, 226, 227, 228, 231, 232,320
    CBSC/PSYC 252, 254, 262, 269
    CSCI 209, 211, 251
    DANC 220
    ECON: all courses numbered 200 and above
    ENGN 250
    ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 305, 307, 308, 309
    ENV 250, 295, 381, 397
    JOUR 215, 270, 325, 335, 371, 372, 377
    MATH 309, 310, 332, 333, 353
    PHIL 240, 242, 346, 348, 354
    POL 215, 227, 232, 233, 245, 246, 247, 255, 280, 381
    POV 423
    SOAN 202, 212, 228, 245, 246, 265, 280, 375
    THTR 220, 238, 239, 251, 253, 361
  9. One course from each International Business and Information Systems. The 18 credits required in 7 and 8 above must include at least one course from each of the following areas:
    a. International Business: BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390, 391, 392 (GERM 392); ECON 270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 280, 317, 356, 382
    b. Information Systems: ACCT 310; BUS 306, 310, 311, 312, 315, 317, 321, 322, 325

For students majoring in both business administration and cogniative and behavioral sciences/psychology, completing both CBSC/PSYC 120 and 250 may be substituted for INTR 202.

Due to content overlap, students may take only one of the following courses for degree credit: DCI 202, ECON 202, INTR 202.
• Students considering the Business Administration major are encouraged to enroll in INTR 202.
• Students considering the Economics major are encouraged to enroll in ECON 202.

Business Administration majors may not minor in Data Science- Business Analytics but may minor in Data Science.

Information Technology Literacy Proficiency: Each Business Administration major must demonstrate proficiency in four distinct Microsoft Office products: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. Proficiency is demonstrated by passing a Microsoft Office Specialist Certification exam in each of the following: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. In addition, each major must pass a Microsoft Office Expert Certification exam in Word and one in Excel. These certifications are prerequisites for certain BUS 200- and 300- level courses, so students should begin the certification process by the beginning of sophomore year. If your course expenses exceed the standard financial-aid allowance for books/supplies/fees, check with Financial Aid about other options.

  1. Required course(s):
    • ACCT 100 - Introduction to Accounting
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Open only to students who have not taken ACCT 201 and/or ACCT 202. An introduction to accounting for both internal and external purposes. Students cover the fundamental principles of financial accounting (external) and an introduction to how companies process financial information in order to disclose it to the public. The course also investigates how managers prepare information for internal purposes (managerial accounting). Financial accounting is guided by external requirements, while managerial accounting generally is not.


    • or both

    • ACCT 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      (No longer offered. See ACCT 100) This course covers the fundamental principles of financial accounting and provides an introduction to the process of accumulating, classifying, and presenting financial information. Primary emphasis is given to understanding the financial statements of a business enterprise.


    • and

    • ACCT 202 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting
      Credits3
      Prerequisite

      Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and sophomore standing.

      FacultyStaff

      (Last offered in Fall, 2018 for those students who have taken ACCT 201. See ACCT 100) This course covers the preparation and utilization of financial information for internal management purposes. Special emphasis is given to cost determination, cost control, and the development of information for planning and decisions.


  2. Required course(s):
    • ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


    • or both

    • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      (No longer offered. See ECON 100) Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.


    • and

    • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      (No longer offered. See ECON 100) Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


  3. Complete:
    • INTR 201 - Information Technology Literacy
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteFirst-year or sophomore standing
      FacultyBallenger

      No longer offered, effective Winter 2020; replaced with a series of Microsoft Office Suite credentialing exams offered on campus. Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Microsoft Outlook). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities. Additional fee required.


    • or Information Technology Literacy Proficiency (see information below)

  4. Required courses:
    • BUS 211 - Marketing Management
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102; ACCT 100 or 201; INTR 201 or all three of the MS Word Specialist, MS Word Expert, and MS PowerPoint specialist certifications; and at least junior standing (sophomores allowed in winter term). Preference to BSADM, ACCT, JMCB or JMCS majors during first round of registration
      FacultyBower, Fox, Straughan

      An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.


    • BUS 217 - Management and Organizational Behavior
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201 or all three of the MS Word Specialist, MS Word Expert, and MS PowerPoint specialist certifications. Preference to BSADM, ACCT, or JMCB majors during first round of registration
      FacultyDean, Schatten

      A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.


    • BUS 221 - Managerial Finance
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102; ACCT 100 or both ACCT 201 and 202; INTR 201 or both of the MS Excel Specialist and MS Excel Expert certifications; one course from INTR 202, ECON 202, DCI 202, CBSC 250, or SOAN 218; and, at least junior standing (sophomores allowed in winter term). Preference to BSADM, ACCT, MATH, or JMCB majors during the first round of registration
      FacultyHoover, Kester

      A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.


    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics
      Credits3

      Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or ECON 202. An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

       


  5. Take one course from:
    • BUS 345 - Business Ethics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201 or both MS Word Specialist and MS Word Expert certification; and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM, ACCT, or JMBC majors during first round of registration. See go.wlu.edu/MOS-testing and contact the department head for Microsoft testing details
      FacultyReiter

      An examination of the moral and ethical issues associated with management policy and executive decisions. The course examines the basic approaches to moral reasoning, macro-moral issues concerning the justice of economic systems, and micro-moral issues, such as the following: conflict of interest, whistle blowing, discrimination in employment, product safety, environment, and advertising.


    • BUS 346 - Foundations of Business Law: Accounting Focus
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing. Preference to ACCT, BSADM, or JMCB during the first round of registration. Students may not take both this course and BUS 348
      FacultyYoungman

      An introduction to the law governing the relations between individuals and businesses in commerce, with a focus on legal concepts tested by the CPA exam and recommended for students who plan to take that exam or pursue a career in accounting. Topics include the law governing torts, contracts, sales of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code, agency, the formation and operation of business associations, government regulation of business, and legal ethics. Assignments apply legal theories and legal ethics to actual business disputes and hypothetical situations.


    • or

    • BUS 348 - Foundations in Business Law
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing. Preference to ACCB, PACC, BSADM, or JMCB during the first round of registration. Students may not take both this course and BUS 346
      FacultyYoungman

      An introduction to the law governing the relations between individuals and businesses in commerce, with a focus on exploring issues faced by both established businesses as well as innovation-driven startups. Topics are selected from the law governing business torts, contracts, products liability, intellectual property, employment law, and government regulation of business. Additional selected topics may be chosen in accordance with the interest of course participants. Assignments apply legal theories and legal ethics to actual business disputes and hypothetical situations.


  6. Take one course from:
    • BUS 398 - Strategic Management
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteBUS 211, BUS 221, and senior standing. Limited to BSADM, ACCT, or JMCB majors
      FacultyA. Hess

      A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.


    • or

    • BUS 399 - Entrepreneurship
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteBUS-211 BUS-221 and senior standing. Limited to BSADM, ACCT, or JMCB majors
      FacultyShay

      A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on business challenges in the context of entrepreneurial firms. Integrating concepts and analytical tools from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations, this seminar helps students develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to excel in either new ventures or in today's increasingly entrepreneurial corporate environments. Among other activities, students learn from case studies, class discussions, and working together to develop and present a business plan.


  7. Business Administration electives:
  8. at least nine additional credits, chosen from Business Administration courses numbered 300 or above, but excluding BUS 401 and 402.
     

  9. Non-Business Administration electives:
  10. nine credits chosen from the following:
     

    ACCT: all courses numbered above 202
    ECON: all courses numbered 200 or above
     

     

    • ARTH 453 - Internship in Arts Management
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyArcher

      Supervised experience in an art gallery, art dealership, museum, or auction house approved by the Art and Art History Department. Requires written exercises and readings, in addition to curatorial projects devised in advance by the instructor and student. May be carried out during the summer.


    • ARTS 217 - Painting I
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyOlson-Janjic

      Emphasis on color, design and spatial relationships. Work from observation and imagination in oil and acrylic. Lab fee required.


    • ARTS 218 - Painting II
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 217 and instructor consent
      FacultyOlson-Janjic

      Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.


    • ARTS 220 - Photography II
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 120 and instructor consent
      FacultyBowden

      An introduction to digital photography, explored through a combination of technique and creative problem solving. Methods and approaches for editing, sequencing, and presentation are investigated. The course includes a combination of demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions related to historical and contemporary movements in the medium. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.


    • ARTS 224 - Color Photography
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 120 and instructor consent
      FacultyBowden

      An exploration of the visual and technical principles of color photography, as applied in the digital realm. Students learn the concepts of color photography through studio projects, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions of methods and artists, historical and contemporary. Students photograph in digital format and learn the craft of fine color printing in the digital darkroom. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.


    • ARTS 226 - Introduction to the Book Arts
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultySmigrod

      A creative exploration of the tradition of the handmade book. Students learn to make several styles of binding, including accordion books, pamphlets, and Japanese bindings, developing some skill in letterpress printing, paper decorating, and simple printmaking techniques to create original handmade books. Readings, discussions, and slide lectures introduce students to the ingenious history of books and printing. Besides constructing imaginative, individual book art projects, students create one collaborative project. Lab fee required.


    • ARTS 227 - Printmaking I
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 111 or instructor consent
      FacultyBeavers

      A survey of fine art printmaking media, with emphasis on beginning techniques and the artistic potential of the print. Media include a selection of techniques from intaglio, relief, and planographic printmaking.


    • ARTS 228 - Printmaking II
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 227 and instructor consent
      FacultyBeavers

      Continuation of Printmaking I, with emphasis on one of the major media of printmaking (intaglio, relief, lithography). Students gain experience both with technique and the creative ability to solve visual problems and present compelling images in two dimensions.


    • ARTS 231 - Introductory Sculpture: Materials and Methods
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      Facultyde Lissovoy

      An introduction to sculpture techniques, tools and materials. Developing skills in working with wood, metal, clay, as well as new media technologies. Lab fee required.


    • ARTS 232 - Intermediate Sculpture: Expanded Material Practice
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteARTS 231
      Facultyde Lissovoy

      Students broaden their understanding of what sculpture can be through projects that materialize memory and imagine new futures. Emphasis is on studio projects in wood, metal, fabric, and non-traditional materials, responding to the ways contemporary sculpture pushes at the edges of what defines it. The course compels students to add significant experience in materializing sculptural projects while deepening perceptions of their own practices. Laboratory fee required.


    • ARTS 320 - Large Format Photography
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteArts 120 and instructor consent
      FacultyBowden

      An introduction to large format photography with the 4x5 camera. Topics covered in the course include advanced exposure techniques utilizing the zone system, the craft of fine printing in both the darkroom and digital studio, and the process for shooting, editing, and sequencing a body of work. Alternative process printing methods may also be explored. This course includes an emphasis on group critique, as well as presentations, readings, and discussions related to historical and contemporary movements in the medium. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.


    • CBSC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception

      (PSYC 252)

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCBSC/PSYC 110 or 111, and CBSC/PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyLorig

      Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.


    • CBSC 254 - Attention

      (PSYC 254)

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCBSC/PSYC 110, 111, or 112, and either CBSC/PSYC 250 or BIOL 201
      FacultyWhiting

      An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.


    • CBSC 262 - Gender-Role Development

      (PSYC 262)

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCBSC/PSYC 113, CBSC/PSYC 250 or WGSS 120
      FacultyFulcher

      This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.


    • CBSC 269 - Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination

      (PSYC 269)

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCBSC/PSYC 114 and CBSC/PSYC 250 (as co-req or pre-req) or instructor consent
      FacultyWoodzicka

      This course examines cognitive and affective processes involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Causes and social implications of prejudice involving various stigmatized groups (e.g., African-Americans, women, homosexuals, people of low socioeconomic status, overweight individuals) are examined. Participants focus on attitudes and behaviors of both perpetrators and targets of prejudice that likely contribute to and result from social inequality.


    • CSCI 209 - Software Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112
      FacultySprenkle

      An examination of the theories and design techniques used in software development. Topics include the software life cycle, design patterns, the Unified Modeling Language, unit testing, refactoring, rapid prototyping, and program documentation.


    • CSCI 211 - Algorithm Design and Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112 and MATH 121 or MATH 201
      FacultyStaff

      Methods for designing efficient algorithms, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and greedy algorithms. Analysis of algorithms for correctness and estimating running time and space requirements. Topics include advanced data structures, graph theory, network flow, and computational intractability.


    • CSCI 318 - Mobile-Application Development
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCSCI 209
      FacultyLambert, Levy

      Students learn how to develop programs for mobile devices, such as cell phones and tablets. The target operating system is either Android or iOS, depending on the instructor offering the course. Classroom lectures on mobile computing and a program development environment are supplemented by extensive hands-on programming assignments, leading to an independent application project of the student's devising. The course culminates with a presentation of each student's application, and an optional upload to the appropriate site for distribution.


    • DANC 220 - Dance Composition
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteDANC 120
      FacultyDavies

      A studio course exploring the craft and art of creating dance performances in a variety of styles and contexts. Images, text, music, improvisation and the elements of time, space and energy are examined as sources for dance material leading to group choreography. This course focuses on creating a finished performance piece for presentation.


    • ENGN 250 - Introduction to Engineering Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 203
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Kuehner

      This course introduces students to the principles of engineering design through first-hand experience with a design project that culminates in a design competition. In this project-based course, the students gain an understanding of computer-aided drafting, machining techniques, construction methods, design criteria, progress- and final-report writing, and group presentations.


    • ENGL 202 - Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FDR FW requirement
      FacultyGavaler

      A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.


    • ENGL 203 - Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction
      FDRHA
      Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment

      A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.


    • ENGL 204 - Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment
      FacultyStaff

      A course in the practice of writing poetry, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.


    • ENGL 206 - Topics in Creative Writing: Nonfiction
      FDRHA
      Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteCompetition of FW requirement. Limited enrollment
      FacultyStaff

      A course in the practice of writing nonfiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • ENGL 305 - Writing Outside the Lines
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThree credits in 200-level English and instructor consent
      FacultyMiranda

      Previous workshop experience recommended. Students who have successfully completed ENGL 203, 204, 205, 206, or 207 should inform the department's administrative assistant, who will grant them permission to enroll. All others should email a short sample of their writing to the professor. The boundaries between genres can limit imagination; this course opens up those borders and invites experimentation and exploration. Designed to help students become better acquainted with craft, technique, and process, the course focuses on mixed-genre writing that defies easy categorization through combining stylistic traits of more than one creative genre (examples might include the prose poem, narrative poem, dramatic monologue, flash fiction, novel vignettes, poetic memoirs, and other hybrids) as well as transforming a piece from one genre to another (for example, turning a poem into flash fiction or monologue). The course requires regular writing and outside reading.


    • ENGL 307 - Fresh/Local/Wild: The Poetics of Food
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteOne course chosen from ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 206, 207, 210, 215, 306, 308, 309, 391, or instructor consent
      FacultyMiranda

      This class visits fresh/local/wild food venues each week, where sensory explorations focus on all aspects of foraging, creating, adapting and eating food. Coursework includes guided writing exercises based on the landscape/geography of food both in the field and classroom, with in-depth readings that help us turn topics like food politics, food insecurity, sustainable agriculture and genetically modified foods into poetry. Individual handmade chapbooks of the term's poems serve as the final product. A service learning component is also included in the course through Campus Kitchen.


    • ENGL 308 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
      FDRHA
      Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteThree credits in any 200- or 300-level creative writing workshop, ENGL 203 recommended. Students who do not meet the requisite may submit a fiction writing sample for possible instructor consent
      FacultyGavaler

      A workshop in writing fiction, requiring regular writing and outside reading.


    • ENGL 309 - Advanced Creative Writing: Memoir
      FDRHA
      Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteThree credits in 200-level English and instructor consent
      FacultyMiranda

      Flannery O'Connor once said that any writer who could survive childhood had enough material to write about for a lifetime. Memoir is a mosaic form, utilizing bits and pieces from autobiography, fiction, essay and poetry in ways that allow the author to muse (speculate, imagine, remember, and question) on their own life experiences. Modern literary memoir requires tremendous work from the author, as she moves both backward and forward in time, re-creates believable dialogue, switches back and forth between scene and summary, and controls the pace and tension of the story with lyricism or brute imagery. In short, the memoirist keeps her reader engaged by being an adept and agile storyteller. This is not straight autobiography. Memoir is more about what can be gleaned from a section of one's life than about chronicling an entire life. Like a mosaic, memoir is about the individual pieces as much as the eventual whole. Work focuses on reading established memoirists, free writing, and workshopping in and out of class.


    • ENV 250 - Ecology of Place
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyCooper, Hurd

      Think globally, study locally. This course explores globally significant environmental issues such as biodiversity conservation, sustainable delivery of ecosystem goods and services, and environmental justice, as they are manifested on a local/regional scale. We examine interactions among ethical, ecological, and economic concerns that shape these issues. Students are fully engaged in the development of policy recommendations that could guide relevant decision makers. The course incorporates readings, field trips, films, and discussions with invited experts.


    • ENV 295 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENV 110 or BIOL 111

      This courses examines special topics in environmental studies, such as ecotourism, the environment and development, local environmental issues, values and the environment, global fisheries, global climate change, tropical deforestation and similar topics of importance, which could change from year to year. This is a research-intensive course where the student would be expected to write a significant paper, either individually or as part of a group, of sufficient quality to be made useful to the scholarly and policy communities. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • ENV 397 - Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENV 110 and completion of any two of the three remaining areas for the Program in Environmental Studies, and instructor consent. ENV 396 is strongly encouraged as preparation
      FacultyStaff

      An interdisciplinary capstone course intended for students in the environmental studies program. Students analyze a particular environmental issue and attempt to integrate scientific inquiry, political and economic analysis and ethical implications. The particular issue changes each year.


    • JOUR 215 - The Magazine: Past, Present, Future
      Credits4
      FacultyCumming

      Magazines are probably the most resilient mass medium we have, which is good news in the digital age. Even though the magazine business was hit hard in recent years, a look at its past and future is far more cheering. In this class, students learn how to investigate a magazine from the past as a way of understanding the magazine business from the inside. They also learn from current magazine editors, writers, and publishers, with a four-night trip to New York City (additional fee required). And students create teams to produce a tablet-ready magazine prototype.


    • JOUR 270 - Digital Media and Society
      Credits4
      FacultyArtwick

      Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.


    • JOUR 325 - Crisis Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 273 or instructor consent; at least junior standing
      FacultyAbah

      A case-study approach to current methods of forecasting problems and responding effectively to crises and consequences in the public and private sectors. Topics include identifying and communicating effectively with stakeholders during crises, effective media-relations strategies during emergencies, building an effective crisis-response plan, regaining public credibility following a crisis, and avoiding public relations mistakes during litigation.


    • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
      FacultySwasy

      Required for the business journalism sequence and appropriate as an elective for journalism, strategic communication, and business administration majors. Reporting and writing techniques for journalists who cover Wall Street and publicly-traded companies. Students learn reporting fundamentals of financial statements, researching corporate documents, and data analysis using the Bloomberg terminal, and how to write industry analysis and narratives.


    • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
      FacultySwasy

      Required for the business journalism sequence and appropriate as an elective for journalism, strategic communication, and business administration majors. Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover global economics. Students learn basics of the reporting and analysis of Federal Reserve reports, economic indicators, and data via the Bloomberg terminal and other resources. Writing emphasizes storytelling about people behind the numbers of the wealth and wage gaps, consumer trends, and worker issues in the global supply chain.


    • JOUR 377 - Media Management & Entrepreneurship
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAppropriate for non-majors. Additional course fee required
      FacultySwasy

      An examination of trends and challenges in media management, including a close examination of industry economics, changing reader and viewer habits, revenue and profit pressures, and labor and management issues unique to the news profession. For Spring 2020, the seminar's focus is on women in the media business, an exploration of how a diverse group of women are reshaping the media business through creation of niche news beats at legacy companies --such as the Washington Post's Tracy Jan covering the intersection of race and the economy--or building new hybrid business models like "American INNO" that mix news, branded content, and events to attract more millennial readers and customers.


    • MATH 309 - Probability
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 221 with C grade or better

      Probability, probability density and distribution functions, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous random variables, and moment generating functions.


    • MATH 310 - Mathematical Statistics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 309

      Sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with C grade or better. Instructor consent required

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332

      An introduction to the study of boundary value problems and partial differential equations. Topics include modeling heat and wave phenomena, Fourier series, separation of variables, and Bessel functions. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • MATH 353 - Numerical Analysis
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and 222
      FacultyStaff

      Analysis, implementation, and applications of algorithms for solving equations, fitting curves, and numerical differentiation and integration. Theorems and proofs are complemented by hands-on programming exercises fostering a concrete understanding of accuracy, efficiency and stability, as well as an awareness of potential pitfalls in machine arithmetic. No previous programming experience is required.


    • PHIL 240 - Contemporary Ethical Theory
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      An in-depth exploration of central questions in contemporary normative ethical theory, including the following: Which features of actions are morally important to determining their rightness (e.g., their motive, their intrinsic nature, their consequences)? What is the relation between moral values and personal values (e.g., those deriving from personal commitments and relationships)? How demanding is morality? How can we evaluate competing theories of normative ethics? Students consider these and related issues by examining contemporary philosophical defenses of consequentialism, deontology, virtue ethics, and contractualism.


    • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.


    • PHIL 346 - Medical Ethics
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyTaylor

      An examination of the issues arising out of the human impact of modern biomedical research and practice. Specific issues are selected from among the following: abortion, contraception, death and dying, experimentation/research, genetics, in vitro fertilization, intellectual and developmental disabilities, public health/community medicine, science/technology, transplantation and patients' rights.


    • PHIL 348 - Legal Ethics
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyCooper

      An examination of the issues associated with lawyers' roles in society and their impact upon and obligations to the client, the court, and the legal profession. The course also addresses questions of the role and function of law and the adversary system.


    • PHIL 354 - Distributive Justice
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing or instructor consent
      FacultyBell

      How should the product of social cooperation be distributed in a just society? Is wealth redistribution through taxes fair? Is it a fair distribution of wealth that a just society depends on, or is distributive justice more complicated than that? Should we have welfare programs, and, if so, what should they be like? Our studies may include John Rawls' political liberalism, Robert Nozick's libertarianism, Ronald Dworkin's equality of resources, Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, Stuart White's justice as fair reciprocity, and criticisms of the distributive paradigm.


    • POL 215 - International Development
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      A study of international development and human capability, with a focus on Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The course analyzes theories to explain development successes and failures, with a focus on the structures, institutions, and actors that shape human societies and social change. Key questions include measuring economic growth and poverty, discussing the roles of states and markets in development, and examining the role of industrialized countries in reducing global poverty. The course explores links between politics and other social sciences and humanities.


    • POL 227 - East Asian Politics
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyLeBlanc

      An investigation of East Asian political systems and the global, historical, and cultural contexts in which their political institutions have developed. Students consider the connections between political structure and the rapid social and economic changes in East Asia since World War II, as well as the effectiveness of varied political processes in addressing contemporary problems. Emphasis is given to China, Korea, and Japan.


    • POL 232 - Public Policy
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePOL 100
      FacultyHarris

      Introduction to public policy formation and implementation, decision making in government, the concepts and techniques of policy analysis, and ethical analysis of policy. Policy issues such as education, the environment, and public health are used as illustrations.


    • POL 233 - Environmental Policy and Law
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100, ECON 101, or POL 100
      FacultyHarris

      A study of major environmental laws and the history of their enactment and implementation. Discusses different theoretical approaches from law, ethics, politics, and economics. Reviews significant case law and the legal context. Emphasis is on domestic policy with some attention to international law and treaties.


    • POL 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4 as sociology only
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • POL 247 - Latin American Politics
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      This course focuses on Latin American politics during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: democracy and authoritarianism; representation and power; populism, socialism, and neoliberalism; and economic development and inequality. The course places particular emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, and Cuba. In addition, the course examines political relations between the United States and Latin America.


    • POL 255 - Gender and Politics
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePOL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent
      FacultyLeBlanc

      This course investigates the gendered terms under which women and men participate in political life. Attention is given to the causes of men's and women's different patterns of participation in politics, to processes that are likely to decrease the inequalities between men's and women's political power, and the processes by which society's gender expectations shape electoral and institutional politics. The different effects of gender on the practice of politics in different nations are compared, with a special emphasis placed on advanced industrial democracies.


    • POL 381 - Seminar in International Political Economy
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100, ECON 102, or POL 105, or instructor consent. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major
      FacultyStaff

      This course provides an intermediate-level introduction to the major actors, questions, and theories in the field of international political economy (IPE). Course participants discuss political and economic interactions in the areas of international trade, fiscal and monetary policy, and exchange rates; discuss globalization in historical and contemporary perspectives; and examine the international politics of the major intergovernmental organizations, multinational corporations, states, and other institutional actors in the global economy.


    • POV 423 - Poverty and Human Capability: A Research Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing, POV 101 or POV 103, POV 453, or instructor consent
      FacultyPickett, Staff

      An inquiry into principal factors or agents responsible for the causes, effects, and remedies of poverty. This examination is conducted through reading appropriate in-depth studies from various disciplines and perspectives, and it culminates with an independent research project into specific aspects of poverty drawing on students' internships and respective areas of study and looking forward to their professional work and civic engagement. This seminar serves as a capstone for undergraduate poverty studies and includes second- and third-year law students in Law 391.


    • SOAN 202 - Contemporary Social Problems
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyEastwood

      A study of the relationship of social problems to the cultural life and social structure of American society. An analysis of the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to selected social problems in American society.


    • SOAN 212 - Theories of Social Psychology
      Credits3
      FacultyChin

      An introduction to three major paradigms present in the sociological tradition of social psychology. The course examines social structure and personality, structural social psychology and symbolic interactionist framework. The three paradigmatic approaches are used to understand how macro-level processes influence micro-level social interaction and vice versa.


    • SOAN 228 - Race and Ethnic Relations
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyMondal

      An examination of why and how society creates and maintains racial and ethnic boundaries in the US. We discuss some of the crucial questions, which include: What conditions constitute a privileged group and an oppressed group? Why and how do racial/ethnic minority groups, the poor, and women experience discrimination, oppression, and exclusion in social life? Is there any racial discrimination against privileged racial/ethnic groups? How can ordinary people, policymakers, and social scientists contribute to improving race and ethnic relations among different social groups in the US?


    • SOAN 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • SOAN 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • SOAN 265 - Exploring Social Networks
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyEastwood

      This course is an introduction to network analysis. Students learn some of the major network analysis literature in sociology and related fields and develop their skills as network analysts in laboratory sessions. Social science, humanities, business, and public health applications are emphasized.


    • SOAN 280 - Gender and Sexuality
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyGoluboff

      An investigation of gender cross culturally. Special consideration is given to the roles of biology, cultural variation, identity, and power in determining patterns of male dominance. Emphasis is placed on changing relationships between men and women in American society.


    • THTR 220 - Playwriting
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent

      An introductory workshop in creative writing for the theater that will focus on traditional forms of scene and script writing. Opportunities for collaborative writing and devised theater may be included. Weekly writing and reading assignments are required. Limited enrollment.


    • THTR 238 - 3D Printing & Desktop Manufacturing for the Theater
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyCollins

      Desktop manufacturing has revolutionized the design and prototyping of objects. This course is an introduction to the use of desktop manufacturing technologies. Students learn how to create digital designs, publish them electronically and create physical versions of those digital ideas. The course concentrates on how these technologies can be used in theater design and technology.


    • THTR 239 - Total Theater
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteThree credits in theater or dance
      FacultyStaff

      Additional fee required. A practical study of design, directing, production and acting problems in a specific style of dramatic literature, culminating in a public theatrical production. Laboratory course. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • THTR 251 - Introduction to Performance Design
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyCollins, Evans

      An introduction to the history, fundamentals and aesthetics of design for theater and dance with an emphasis on the collaborative nature of the design disciplines. Design projects are required. Lab fee required


    • THTR 253 - Digital Production
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyEvans

      Digital technologies and multimedia interaction are increasingly utilized to produce, enhance, and innovate theatrical production. Students examine and experiment with various digital technologies as they relate to theater and dance performance. Students create digital audio, video, design rendering, and animation projects for theatrical performances.


    • THTR 361 - Stage Directing 1
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteTHTR 141 and instructor consent
      FacultyLevy

      An introduction to directing for the stage.  In this hands-on class, students learn and develop basic techniques for integrating work with scripts, performers, and designers into a cohesive stage performance.  Students direct scenes from realistic modern or contemporary plays, focusing on collaboration, clarity, imagination, and analysis to create stage pictures and character relationships that tell a specific story on stage.  The class culminates in invited classroom performances.


  11. One course from each International Business and Information Systems
  12. The 18 credits required in 7 and 8 above must include at least one course from each of the following areas:
     



     

    • International Business:
      • BUS 305 - Seminar in International Business
        Credits3 credits in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        PrerequisitePreference to BSADM or JMCB majors during the first round of registration

        Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • BUS 330 - Global Human-Resource Management
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBUS 217 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during first round of registration
        FacultyDean

        Human-resource management (HRM) is concerned with how to best attract, select, develop, and retain employees in organizations. This course examines HRM in the global context. Topics include employee selection, training, performance management, compensation, health, safety, and security, and termination. We focus on designing HRM practices in the context of the global social, legal, and technological environments.


      • BUS 337 - Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteINTR 201 or all MS Word Specialist, MS Word Expert, and MS PowerPoint Specialist certification; and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration. See go.wlu.edu/MOS-testing and contact the department head for Microsoft testing details
        FacultyReiter

        This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.


      • BUS 357 - Multinational Business Finance
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBUS 221 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM, ACCT, or JMCB majors during first round of registration
        FacultyStaff

        A study of the critical aspects of managerial finance in a multinational setting, covering both theoretical and practical issues. Emphasis is placed on identifying the unique risk-return opportunities faced by corporations that maintain business units across national borders. Topics included are foreign exchange and exchange rate determination, international capital markets, the environment of multinational corporate finance, risk management, and cross-border investment decisions. Text, readings, and projects.


      • BUS 391 - Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteAt least sophomore standing and instructor consent
        FacultyStraughan, Oliver

        The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor. May be taken twice for degree credit if the topics are significantly different.


      • BUS 392 - Layered Berlin: German Culture and the Social Market Economy

        (GERM 392)

        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGERM 262 and instructor consent
        FacultyA. Hess and P. Youngman

        A four-week course taught abroad that offers students a true immersion in German language, culture, and business environment. In order to give students a complete understanding of contemporary Germany, we integrate a literary-historical analysis of the country's rich history from 1848 to the present day with an introduction to German social and economic system that focuses on stakeholder-centric business and sustainability principles. Through an exciting mix of literary fiction, historical readings and cases, film screenings, along with corporate and cultural site visits, students gain an understanding of the interdependence between "big C" Culture and business culture.


      • ECON 270 - International Trade
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyAnderson, Davies

        Specialization of production, the gains from trade, and their distribution, nationally and internationally. Theory of tariffs. Commercial policy from the mercantilist era to the present. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Transnational economic integration: the European Community and other regional blocs.


      • ECON 271 - International Finance
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyAnderson, Davies

        International monetary arrangements, balance-of-payments adjustment processes, and the mutual dependence of macroeconomic variables and policies in trading nations. The International Monetary Fund (IMF), international investment, and the World Bank. International cooperation for economic stability.


      • ECON 274 - China's Modern Economy
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyStaff

        Economic analysis of the Chinese economy in the 20th century. Comparisons of pre- and post-revolutionary periods. Performance and policies of Taiwan and mainland China. Issues include the population problem, industrialization, provision of public health and education, alleviation of poverty and inequality. Microeconomic emphasis.


      • ECON 280 - Development Economics
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyCasey, Blunch

        A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.


      • ECON 356 - Economics of the Environment in Developing Countries
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 203 and either ECON 255 or 280, or obtain instructor consent. Preference to ECON or ENV majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyKahn, Casey

        This course focuses on the unique characteristics of the relationship between the environment and the economy in developing nations. Differences in economic structure, political structure, culture, social organization and ecosystem dynamics are emphasized as alternative policies for environmental and resource management are analyzed.


    • Information Systems:
      • ACCT 310 - Accounting Information Systems
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteACCT 201 and at least junior standing
        FacultyBallenger

        An introduction to the information systems used in accounting, including the flow of data from source documents through the accounting cycle into reports for decision makers; the principle of internal control; flowcharting and systems narratives; and use of computers and database systems in accounting information. Students have hands-on experience implementing and using accounting information systems.


      • BUS 306 - Seminar in Management Information Systems
        Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
        PrerequisiteMay vary with topics. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during the first round of registration

        Topics vary by term and instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • BUS 310 - Management Information Systems
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteINTR 201 or all MS Excel Specialist, MS Excel Expert, MS PowerPoint Specialist, and MS Outlook Specialist certification; and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during first round of registration. See go.wlu.edu/MOS-testing and contact the department head for Microsoft testing details
        FacultyLarson

        The objective is to build an understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. Topics include basic systems concepts and major roles of information systems; computer, telecommunications, and database management concepts; and management issues in the implementation of information systems, including international, security, and ethical considerations.


      • BUS 315 - Database Management for Business
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteINTR 201 or all MS Excel Specialist, MS Excel Expert, and MS Outlook Specialist certification; and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during first round of registration. See go.wlu.edu/MOS-testing and contact the department head for Microsoft testing details.
        FacultyLarson

        An introduction to the theories, concepts, features, and capabilities of database management systems in a business environment. This course provides a greater understanding of how to design, develop and access database-driven business applications and emphasizes the use of database-management systems in real-world business settings and how this technology can be applied effectively to solve business problems. In this project-oriented course, students acquire the skills to document, design, create, test, and access a fully functional Oracle business database application. No prior programming or application development experience is assumed.


      • BUS 317 - Data Mining for Sales, Marketing and Customer Relationship Management
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteINTR 201; INTR 202, ECON 202, DCI 202, CBSC 250, or SOAN 218, and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during initial registration
        FacultyBallenger

        This course provides an introduction and overview to data mining as a means to understanding customers (existing and potential) in a broad sense, rather than focusing on underlying theory. Many organizations have a wealth of data residing in their databases. Business data mining is the process of collecting and turning this resource into business value. Basic data-mining methods have broad applications: market-basket analysis of scanner data, customer relationship management, churn analysis, direct marketing, fraud detection, click-stream web mining, personalization and recommendation systems, risk management, and credit scoring. The course provides hands-on experience in applying these techniques to practical real-world business problems using commercial data-mining software.


      • BUS 321 - Multimedia Design and Development
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteINTR 201 or MS Outlook Specialist certification; and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during first round of registration. See go.wlu.edu/MOS-testing and contact the department head for Microsoft testing details
        FacultyBallenger

        This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using WordPress development using Headway Themes with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Pro X as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.


      • BUS 322 - Data Science for Business
        Credits3
        FacultyLarson

        No prior programming experience required. Meets the Information Systems requirement in the business administration major. Data Science is a hot new field, but data scientists are only as good as their ability to ask the right questions about the data they are investigating. This course covers the nuts and bolts of data science without programming, focusing on how organizations can make smarter decisions to address their business problems and create new business opportunities. Students use industry-standard tools to achieve a range of competencies from machine learning and statistics to data wrangling, data visualization, and data access. We emphasize best practices in coding, data handling, and adherence to the principles of reproducible research.


      • BUS 325 - E-Commerce Development
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteINTR 201 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration
        FacultyStaff

        An introduction to the benefits, capabilities and related information technologies, which comprise the current state and emerging technologies of e-commerce. This course provides an understanding of how to design, develop and implement e-commerce order processing websites using industry leading e-commerce shopping cart software. In this project-oriented course, students acquire the skills to design, create, and administer a fully functional Web-based e-commerce solution. Students learn how to leverage features of the e-commerce software to attract consumers, increase conversion rates, and maximize the return on their ecommerce investment. No prior e-commerce or Web development experience is assumed. Laboratory fee.


  13. Business Adm and Cognitive and Behavioral Science/Psychology majors:
  14. For students majoring in both business administration and cognitive and behavioral science/psychology, completing both CBSC/PSYC 120 and 250 may be substituted for INTR 202."

  15. Information Technology Literacy Proficiency:
  16. Each Business Administration major must demonstrate proficiency in four distinct Microsoft Office products: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. Proficiency is demonstrated by passing a Microsoft Office Specialist Certification exam in each of the following: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. In addition, each major must pass a Microsoft Office Expert Certification exam in Word and one in Excel. These certifications are prerequisites for certain BUS 200- and 300- level courses, so students should begin the certification process by the beginning of sophomore year. If your course expenses exceed the standard financial-aid allowance for books/supplies/fees, check with Financial Aid about other options.