Native American Heritage Events Hosted by the WLU Native American Cohort

Our mission is to improve American Indian awareness and education on campus in order to provide a welcoming, vibrant, and culturally sensitive environment for W&L students and employees who identify as American Indian and those who support the issues faced by American Indians today.

We are excited to roll out our second year of events for the W&L and Rockbridge community! This article, W&L Announces Yearlong Native American Heritage Celebration, published in the September 24, 2020 Columns highlights some of the new initiatives our cohort has been working on the last year to create more awareness for Native people and cultures. We hope you will join us at our two October events (description below and poster attached). Please reach out to any member of the cohort with questions you may have!

A W&L Institutional History Conversation: The Indian World of George Washington 

featuring Dr. Colin Calloway (Dartmouth College)community panelists: Victoria P. Ferguson (Monacan Indian Nation member), Tom Camden (Monacan descendant), Dr. Lynn Rainville, Dr. Harvey Markowtiz

Thursday, October 1 - 5:00 pm Register at this link to attend webinar: http://go.wlu.edu/indian-world-of-george-washington

Event description: Join us for a conversation with Historian and Professor, Colin G. Calloway.  Washington and Lee University will host an evening event with the distinguished author from Dartmouth College to discuss his book The Indian World of George Washington.   Washington's association with American Indians had a profound effect on the founding of this nation, the treaties with indigenous nations, and the land acquisition which played a part in the endowment Washington made for the establishment of this University.  Local historians will have the opportunity to talk with Mr. Calloway about the book and how Washington's relationship with various tribal nations helped to shape the United States. Dr. Calloway will be joined by panelists Victoria P. Ferguson (Monacan Indian Nation member), Tom Camden (Monacan descendant), Dr. Lynn Rainville, and Dr. Harvey Markowtiz of the Native American Cohort at Washington and Lee University

Indigenous People's Day event: Minneapolis, American Indians, Police Brutality & Community

featuring Dr. Katrina Phillips discussing her article in the Washington Post "Long Time Police Brutality drives American Indians to join the George Floyd Protests"community panelists: Fran Elrod, Joseph Guse, Harvey Markowitz, Jessica Wager

Monday, October 12 - 7:00 pm Register at this link to attend webinar: http://go.wlu.edu/indigenous-peoples-day-celebration

*Dr. Phillips will return in Spring 2021 as a guest of the Africana Studies Year Long Series

Event description: For Indigenous People's Day 2020, The W&L Native American Cohort is proud to host Dr. Katrina Phillips (Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe) of Macalester College discussing her Washington Post article "Longtime police brutality drove American Indians to join the George Floyd protests". Dr. Phillips will be joined by Fran Elrod, Kelly Fujiwara (Miwok descendant), Joseph Guse, Harvey Markowitz, and Jessica Wager (Muscogee descendant) to discuss additional topics of indigenous rights and the interconnectedness of current social movements.

A W&L Institutional History Conversation: The Indian World of George Washington

Thursday, October 1, 5:00 pm
Listen to Event Recording

Join us for a conversation with Historian and Professor, Colin G. Calloway. Washington and Lee University will host an evening event with the distinguished author from Dartmouth College to discuss his book The Indian World of George Washington. Washington's association with American Indians had a profound effect on the founding of this nation, the treaties with indigenous nations, and the land acquisition which played a part in the endowment Washington made for the establishment of this University.  Local historians will have the opportunity to talk with Mr. Calloway about the book and how Washington's relationship with various tribal nations helped to shape the United States. Dr. Calloway will be joined by panelists Victoria P. Ferguson (Monacan Indian Nation member), Tom Camden (Monacan descendant), Dr. Lynn Rainville, and Dr. Harvey Markowtiz of the Native American Cohort at Washington and Lee University.

Climate Change and Pacific Islander Eco-Poetics

Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 7:30pm
Zoom Registration: go.wlu.edu/perez
The Shannon-Clark lecture and retreat are highlights of our academic year in the department. This year, our lecture and retreat will take place in a digital format. We are honored to welcome Dr. Craig Santos Perez, a Professor of English at the University of Hawai’i, Mānoa, who specializes in creative writing, ecopoetry, and Pacific literature. Dr. Perez is an indigenous Chamoru (Chamorro) from the Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam). He is a poet, scholar, editor, publisher, essayist, critic, book reviewer, artist, environmentalist, and political activist. He is the co-founder of Ala Press, co-editor of five anthologies of Pacific literature and eco-literature, and the author of two spoken word poetry albums and five books of poetry. Find out more about Dr. Perez.

Indigenous People’s Day: Minneapolis, American Indians, Police Brutality & Community

Monday, October 12, 7:00 pm
Zoom Registration:
go.wlu.edu/indigenous-peoples-day-celebration
For Indigenous People's Day 2020, The W&L Native American Cohort is proud to host Dr. Katrina Phillips (Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe) of Macalester College discussing her Washington Post article "Longtime police brutality drove American Indians to join the George Floyd protests." Dr. Phillips will be joined by Fran Elrod, Kelly Fujiwara (Miwok descendant), Joseph Guse, Harvey Markowitz, and Jessica Wager (Muscogee descendant) to discuss additional topics of indigenous rights and the interconnectedness of current social movements. *Dr. Phillips will return in Spring 2021 as a guest of the Africana Studies Year Long Series

Joining Voices: Native American and Jewish community

in partnership with Hillel
Part 1: Mascots and Visual Rhetoric November 2020
Part 2: Land and Indigeneity January 27, 2020, time TBD
Part 3: A call to action: leading with effective change for your community March 2021

Native American Cohort Membership

  • Thomas E. Camden '76 (Monacan Indian Nation descendant) Associate Professor, Head, Special Collections & University Archives
  • Francile Elrod, Associate Director of Community-Based Learning, Shepherd Program
  • Victoria P. Ferguson (Monacan Indian Nation), and descendant of the people upon whose land your very institution sits (Native American Cohort Monacan community member)
  • Chelsea Fisher, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies
  • Kelly Fujiwara (Miwok descendant), Special Events Coordinator at Lee House
  • Joseph Guse, Professor of Economics
  • Kim Hodge, Director of Sustainability Initiatives & Education
  • Harvey Markowitz, Professor of Anthropology
  • Deborah Miranda (Esselen and Chumash), Thomas H. Broadus, Jr. Professor of English
  • Seth Michelson, Associate Professor of Spanish
  • Ella Powers '22
  • Nicole Poulin, Campus Garden Manager
  • Jessica Wager (Muscogee Creek descendant), Executive Assistant to the Provos
  • Susan Wager (Muscogee Creek descendant), Assistant Director of the Lenfest Center

Read More About the Cohort