Film Courses

Spring 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Science in Art: Technical Examination of 17th-Century Dutch Paintings

ARTH 356 - Uffelman, Erich S.

Spring Term Abroad course. A survey of 17th-century Dutch history, art history, politics, religion, economics, etc., which links the scientific analysis of art to the art and culture of the time. The course begins on campus and then history, etc., will occur for a few days in Lexington and then proceed to Center for European Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands. Students visit numerous museums, hear guest lectures from faculty at Universiteit Maastricht, and observe at conservation laboratories at some of the major Dutch art museums. Students are graded by their performance on two research projects involving presentations and journals. Though students are not required to learn a world language to participate in the program, they are expected to learn key phrases in Dutch as a matter of courtesy to citizens of the host country.

Antique Photographic Processes

ARTS 221 - Phillips, Sarah E.

This class serves as an introductory exploration of alternative image-making. This class emphasizes the intersection between that 19th-century photographic processes and  contemporary digital image-making, and explores each process in its historical context. Individual processes are learned through studio demonstration and intensive hands-on lab sessions. Processes covered in this course include cyanotype and toning, Van Dyke, anthotype, lumen printing, and platinum and palladium printing from digital imagery and photograms.  Students learn how to make enlarged digital negatives for contact printing from photographs that originate in digital formats. In addition to technique, students learn the historical background of each process, as well as contemporary trends and artists working with these methods.

East Asian Cinema

EALL 215 - Zhu, Yanhong

This course provides an introduction to and overview of contemporary East Asian cinema, including the Chinese-language cinemas of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and those of Japan and Korea. It focuses on the flourishing cinema of East Asia since the 1980s and provides a solid foundation in the successes and dominant tendencies of contemporary East Asian cinema and culture. Among the aims of the course are examining ways in which the contemporary East Asian cinemas and cultures are in dialogue with one another and looking at specific conditions and cultural forces at work in each unique case. The course also explores how the cinemas of East Asia reflect the changing cultural, economic, historical, political and social conditions of each country and how these cinemas and cultures are part of a larger redefinition of the idea of a national culture. Screenings and readings consist of exemplary works from each East Asian culture, organized around specific motifs, such as history, memory, identity, communication, love, and death.

Screenwriting

FILM 220 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

In this course, students learn about the art and business of screenwriting, studying story and narrative structures, and what makes a story interesting to us. We begin by looking at the human need for story and how we can both access and feed this basic principle of human existence. In addition, you learn how to write your own stories into a screenplay. With creative discipline, you practice writing believable characters and scenes that will draw audiences in through the art of crafting great dialogue. You begin with the spark of your idea at the beginning of the term, turn it into a treatment, and eventually a full screenplay that you then have an opportunity to pitch to a producer for feedback. From your first draft, you learn the art of refining your screenplay, focusing on how to give it great tonality and form, building your skills as a writer, a creative thinker, and following through a whole artistic process.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts

POL 290A - Ponce de Leon Seijas, Zoila

In this course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. The topic is announced at registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Only one such seminar may be counted towards the politics major.

Spring 2022, POL 290A-01: Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts: Dystopian Fiction, Horror, and Politics (3). An examination of the political commentary included in dystopian fiction and horror novels and films. Through the analysis of seminal novels such as 1984 and Brave New World , and recent films such as US , students assess different political concepts, including power, government, freedom, and equality. Literature and film can offer the most mesmerizing yet frightening depictions of our present and future world. At the same time, they can provide us with the opportunity to critically compare our contemporary experiences to those portrayed in them. Our main goal is to critically assess the role of the government and powerful actors in our society. We complement our analysis with a variety of academic readings and opinion pieces. (SS2) Ponce de Leon.

Winter 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Surrealism

ARTH 264 - King, Elliott H.

Surrealism was one of the most multi-faceted and influential intellectual movements of the 20th century with a legacy and practice that continues today. This seminar examines the key writings and ideas that underlie surrealism with a focus on its artistic practice. We will consider works by artists including Salvador Dalí, René Magritte, and Max Ernst; watch surrealist films; discuss the significance of dreams; and play surrealist "games of chance."

Art and Revolution: Mexican Muralism

ARTH 274 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities requirement for the LACS minor. A survey of public monumental art produced by Mexican artists Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros in Mexico and the United States from 1910 to the 1970s. Lectures focus on art that promotes social ideals and the role that art played in building a new national consciousness in Mexico. Students also examine the impact of muralism throughout Latin America and the United States.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Beavers, Leigh A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Phillips, Sarah E.

An introduction to the methods and materials of photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and light. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Painting II

ARTS 218 - Stevens-Lubin, Laure A.

Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.

Science in Art

CHEM 156 - Uffelman, Erich S.

This course develops students' fundamental understanding of certain physical, chemical, biological, and geological concepts and utilizes that vocabulary and knowledge to discuss 17th-century Dutch art. The emphasis is on key aspects of optics, light, and chemical bonding needed to understand how a painting "works" and how art conservators analyze paintings in terms of conservation and authenticity, using techniques such as X-ray radiography, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, infrared microscopy, infrared reflectography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, UV photography, and laser ablation methods. When possible, the course develops modern notions of science with those of the 17th century in order to see how 17th-century science influenced 17th-century art.

Introduction to Film

ENGL 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Introduction to Film

ENGL 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

FILM 121 - Evans, Shawn Paul

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Screenwriting

FILM 220 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

In this course, students learn about the art and business of screenwriting, studying story and narrative structures, and what makes a story interesting to us. We begin by looking at the human need for story and how we can both access and feed this basic principle of human existence. In addition, you learn how to write your own stories into a screenplay. With creative discipline, you practice writing believable characters and scenes that will draw audiences in through the art of crafting great dialogue. You begin with the spark of your idea at the beginning of the term, turn it into a treatment, and eventually a full screenplay that you then have an opportunity to pitch to a producer for feedback. From your first draft, you learn the art of refining your screenplay, focusing on how to give it great tonality and form, building your skills as a writer, a creative thinker, and following through a whole artistic process.

Introduction to Film

FILM 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Introduction to Film

FILM 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Research and Writing Film Capstone

FILM 413 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

Research and Writing Film Capstone

FILM 413 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

THTR 121 - Evans, Shawn Paul

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Stage Acting 1

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Digital Production

THTR 253 - Evans, Shawn Paul

Digital technologies and multimedia interaction are increasingly utilized to produce, enhance, and innovate theatrical production. Students examine and experiment with various digital technologies as they relate to theater and dance performance. Students create digital audio, video, design rendering, and animation projects for theatrical performances.

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Art Since 1945

ARTH 267 - King, Elliott H.

This course introduces students to art and art theory from 1945 to the present. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance student knowledge of the major works, artists, and movements of art in Europe and the United States since 1945; (2) to integrate these works of art within the broader social and intellectual history of the period; and  (3) to help students develop their skills in visual analysis and historical interpretation. Among the issues we examine are the politics of abstract art; the ongoing dialogue between art and mass culture; the differences between modernism and postmodernism; and contemporary critiques of art history's prevailing narratives. This is a lecture course with a heavy emphasis on in-class discussion.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Stevens-Lubin, Laure A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Beavers, Leigh A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Archer, Clover H.

An introduction to the methods and materials of photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and light. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Design I

ARTS 131 - de Lissovoy, Sandy B.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Introduction to Film

ENGL 233 - Adams, Edward A.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

FILM 121 - Powers-Kusio, Kathleen M. (Kate) / Davies, Jenefer M.

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Screenwriting

FILM 220 - Davies, Jenefer M.

In this course, students learn about the art and business of screenwriting, studying story and narrative structures, and what makes a story interesting to us. We begin by looking at the human need for story and how we can both access and feed this basic principle of human existence. In addition, you learn how to write your own stories into a screenplay. With creative discipline, you practice writing believable characters and scenes that will draw audiences in through the art of crafting great dialogue. You begin with the spark of your idea at the beginning of the term, turn it into a treatment, and eventually a full screenplay that you then have an opportunity to pitch to a producer for feedback. From your first draft, you learn the art of refining your screenplay, focusing on how to give it great tonality and form, building your skills as a writer, a creative thinker, and following through a whole artistic process.

Introduction to Film

FILM 233 - Adams, Edward A.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

THTR 121 - Powers-Kusio, Kathleen M. (Kate) / Davies, Jenefer M.

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Stage Acting 1

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Lighting Design

THTR 336 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A study of the practice of stage lighting, focusing on styles of production, historical methods and artistic theory. Culminates in a light design for a public theatrical production. Lab fee required.

Stage Directing 1

THTR 361 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to directing for the stage.  In this hands-on class, students learn and develop basic techniques for integrating work with scripts, performers, and designers into a cohesive stage performance.  Students direct scenes from realistic modern or contemporary plays, focusing on collaboration, clarity, imagination, and analysis to create stage pictures and character relationships that tell a specific story on stage.  The class culminates in invited classroom performances.