Course Offerings

Winter 2023

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Negrete, Mario E.

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Silwal, Shikha B.

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Upadhyay, Sakshi

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Anderson, Michael A.

Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Grajzl, Peter

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Alvarez, Camilo

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Money and Banking

ECON 215 - Hooks, Linda M.

A study of the fundamental principles of money, credit, and banking in the United States. Emphasis is on modern conditions and problems, with particular attention to the validity of monetary and banking theory in the present domestic and international situation.

Labor Economics

ECON 230 - Smith, Chantal D.

This course addresses how labor markets and institutions allocate labor and determine earnings and the distribution of income in the United States. Economic models are used to explain labor market outcomes generated by our economy. Where such outcomes are deemed less than socially optimal, these models are used to evaluate prospective and current labor market policies intended to address these shortcomings. Some attention is given to comparing American labor market outcomes with those in other developed countries.

Women in the Economy

ECON 251 - Shester, Katharine L.

Students explore how economic theory and analysis can be applied to examine the multiple roles that women play in our society. In particular, we examine linkages and changes in women's human capital, marriage, fertility, family structure, and occupation and labor supply decisions in the post-World War II era. We also investigate the magnitude and causes of the gender wage gap. We assess how much of the gender wage gap can be explained by education and occupational choice, and how much appears to be due to discrimination. We also learn about {and try to explain} the differences in labor-market outcomes for women with and without children. Finally, we access the causes and consequences of teenage pregnancy and single motherhood.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

ECON 255 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.

Comparative Institutional Economics

ECON 281 - Grajzl, Peter

Institutions such as laws, the political system, and cultural norms embed all social activity. They structure economic, political, and social interaction and as such play a central role in facilitating (or hindering) economic development. This course's objective is to explore from a broad perspective how institutions affect economic performance, what the determinants of institutions are, and how institutions evolve. We study examples from the existing capitalist economies, the developing and transition countries, as well as the more distant history. Because the study of institutions is necessarily an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course combines the approach of economics with the insights from law, political science, history, and sociology.

Economics of the Environment in Developing Countries

ECON 356 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

This course focuses on the unique characteristics of the relationship between the environment and the economy in developing nations. Differences in economic structure, political structure, culture, social organization and ecosystem dynamics are emphasized as alternative policies for environmental and resource management are analyzed.

Special Topics in Economics: Experimental Economics: Understanding Human Behavior

ECON 395B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

This course focuses on understanding human behavior in response to stimuli.  For example, why does the appearance of Tiger Woods in a Nike commercial instill customer faith?  Why are consumers confused by the long aisle of breakfast cereals at Walmart?  Theoretical and experimental studies of human behavior rely heavily on Economics and Psychology and have answered many such interesting questions.  Firms have noticed this research, and have responded with novel marketing decisions.  Other actors have also noticed.  For example, the research has influenced government advertisements aimed at increasing vaccination rates, lowering public smoking, saving electricity, etc.  Students become familiar with state-of-the-art research methodology in experimental economics, where they learn to conduct their own research projects by participating and designing experiments. Students also learn how to describe and interpret well-known results in experimental economics, alongside analyzing and critiquing experimental designs.

Special Topics in Economics: Macro Forecasting

ECON 395E - Negrete, Mario E.

Time-series analysis and forecasting methodologies that are applied to issues in business, finance, and economics. The course covers various analytical techniques used by economists to model and forecast macroeconomic levels of economic activity. Topics include smoothing techniques, time-series decomposition methods, regression-based forecasting, unit root tests, and ARMA and SVAR modeling. Students learn to perform time-series regressions, undertake forecasting exercises, and test a variety of hypotheses involving time-series data. Stata and Excel software are used throughout. 

Honors Thesis Workshop

ECON 440 - Shester, Katharine L.

Group workshop and seminar for students pursuing an honors thesis in Economics. Includes directed readings and research as well as presentations of Individual work.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This course is required of honors candidates in economics. An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Shester, Katharine L.

This course is required of honors candidates in economics. An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - / Upadhyay, Sakshi

This course is required of honors candidates in economics. An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This course is required of honors candidates in economics. An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Fall 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Shester, Katharine L.

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Smith, Chantal D.

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice Tianbo)

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Grajzl, Peter

Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

FS: First-Year Seminar: The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work

ECON 180A - Casey, James F. (Jim)

This fall, millions of students will head off to start college, eager to understand more about themselves and the world they will work and live in. The technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution - voice and facial recognition, machine learning, and algorithms to guide predictions, all of which fall under the umbrella of artificial intelligence, and industrial robotics - are emerging as defining features of contemporary social and economic life.  This course explores the determinants and socioeconomic impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution through an economic lens, while also embracing and utilizing insights from other disciplines.  The full range of fundamental economic ideas and concepts found in a conventional course on the principles of micro and macroeconomics will be introduced, mastered, and drawn upon to facilitate our exploration.  Indeed, this course meets the requirement for economics courses that have Economics 100 as a pre-requisite.  Students will develop their analysis, writing, and presentation skills through readings, short compositions, essay exams, class discussion, and small group activities.

FS: First-Year Seminar: The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work

ECON 180A - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This fall, millions of students will head off to start college, eager to understand more about themselves and the world they will work and live in. The technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution - voice and facial recognition, machine learning, and algorithms to guide predictions, all of which fall under the umbrella of artificial intelligence, and industrial robotics - are emerging as defining features of contemporary social and economic life.  This course explores the determinants and socioeconomic impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution through an economic lens, while also embracing and utilizing insights from other disciplines.  The full range of fundamental economic ideas and concepts found in a conventional course on the principles of micro and macroeconomics will be introduced, mastered, and drawn upon to facilitate our exploration.  Indeed, this course meets the requirement for economics courses that have Economics 100 as a pre-requisite.  Students will develop their analysis, writing, and presentation skills through readings, short compositions, essay exams, class discussion, and small group activities.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice Tianbo)

Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Negrete, Mario E.

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Money and Banking

ECON 215 - Hooks, Linda M.

A study of the fundamental principles of money, credit, and banking in the United States. Emphasis is on modern conditions and problems, with particular attention to the validity of monetary and banking theory in the present domestic and international situation.

The Economics of Social Issues

ECON 235 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This seminar is based on readings that set out hypotheses developed by economists and other social scientists regarding the causes and consequences of a wide range of social problems. Evidence examining the validity of these hypotheses is scrutinized and evaluated. The course is writing intensive and interdisciplinary since readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, poverty, education, health, crime, race, ethnicity, immigration, and fiscal matters.

Economics of War and Peace

ECON 241 - Silwal, Shikha B.

In this course. we will look at the economic conditions and behaviors during periods of conflict. As such. the focus of the course is to develop a theoretical understanding of how human interaction can be modeled to study both peace and violent outcomes. To do so, we will view individuals' decision to be engaged in conflict as a rational choice. This viewpoint allows us to use economic principles to study individual behavior, design policies to alter those behaviors, and assess economic losses due to conflict. The topics covered in this class range from civil wars and genocide to international terrorism.

Public Finance and Public Policy

ECON 250 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Public choices and the public economy. An inquiry into how the references of individuals and groups are translated into public sector economic activity. The nature of public activity and public choice institutions. The question of social balance. The effects of government expenditures and taxes on the economic behavior of individuals and firms.

International Trade

ECON 270 - Anderson, Michael A.

Specialization of production, the gains from trade, and their distribution, nationally and internationally. Theory of tariffs. Commercial policy from the mercantilist era to the present. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Transnational economic integration: the European Community and other regional blocs.

Development Economics

ECON 280 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.

Comparative Institutional Economics

ECON 281 - Grajzl, Peter

Institutions such as laws, the political system, and cultural norms embed all social activity. They structure economic, political, and social interaction and as such play a central role in facilitating (or hindering) economic development. This course's objective is to explore from a broad perspective how institutions affect economic performance, what the determinants of institutions are, and how institutions evolve. We study examples from the existing capitalist economies, the developing and transition countries, as well as the more distant history. Because the study of institutions is necessarily an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course combines the approach of economics with the insights from law, political science, history, and sociology.

Special Topics in Economics: Behavioral and Experimental Economics

ECON 295B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

The aim of the course will be to understand the notions of human behavior in everyday lives and its impact on markets. We will be taking the help of psychological insights to decipher why we overthink a bad outcome while undermining the possibility of a good outcome, what role does bias play when we place our bets in a casino or how do we create expectations in our minds regarding tomorrow's prices. We will be discussing policy prescriptions and analyzing case studies on how small changes in the environment can change human behavior so drastically. We will discuss the fundamentals of conducting laboratory and online experiments, which are valuable skill sets.

Game Theory

ECON 302 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This course abandons the assumptions of perfect competition. Buyers and sellers may be few; information may be privately held; property rights may poorly enforced; externalities abound and uncertainty is the rule. Game theory is a general framework for analyzing the messy world of strategic interactions. Standard solution concepts such as Nash Equilibrium, subgame perfection, and Bayesian equilibrium are introduced in the context of a broad array of microeconomic topics. These include auctions, bargaining, oligopoly, labor market signaling, public finance and insurance. Class time combines lectures, problem-solving workshops, and classroom experiments.

Advanced U.S. Economic History

ECON 344 - Shester, Katharine L.

This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy. The goals are to review some major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data. Major themes vary, but usually include: agriculture/environment; fertility; health; race; World War II; and urbanization. Students will read, discuss, and present empirical economic research papers, replicate results from select papers, and write original empirical research papers.

Special Topics in Economics: Experimental Economics: Understanding Human Behavior

ECON 395B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

This course focuses on understanding human behavior in response to stimuli.  For example, why does the appearance of Tiger Woods in a Nike commercial instill customer faith?  Why are consumers confused by the long aisle of breakfast cereals at Walmart?  Theoretical and experimental studies of human behavior rely heavily on Economics and Psychology and have answered many such interesting questions.  Firms have noticed this research, and have responded with novel marketing decisions.  Other actors have also noticed.  For example, the research has influenced government advertisements aimed at increasing vaccination rates, lowering public smoking, saving electricity, etc.  Students become familiar with state-of-the-art research methodology in experimental economics, where they learn to conduct their own research projects by participating and designing experiments. Students also learn how to describe and interpret well-known results in experimental economics, alongside analyzing and critiquing experimental designs.

Special Topics in Economics: Financial Economics

ECON 395C - Alvarez, Camilo

The course is structured around understanding the economics behind financial markets and assets prices, and how individual investors react to those. We start with an overview of the different roles of the financial industry and their importance. Then we think about portfolio choice and how to value risky assets. As we aggregate into markets, we discuss the usefulness and faults of models like CAPM, and the Efficient Market Hypothesis.  Finally, we  use the binomial model to learn about option pricing the fundamental theorems of finance.

Special Topics in Economics: Environmental Valuation

ECON 395D - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

This course focuses on advanced knowledge of environmental valuation techniques and how it can be used to inform policy decisions. Both theoretical models and empirical work are discussed. Work includes critiquing literature in the area of environmental valuation and empirical assignments. 

Directed Independent Study: Environmental Economics

ECON 402A - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice Tianbo)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of economics not presented in other courses, or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Shester, Katharine L.

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - / Upadhyay, Sakshi

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major.

Honors Thesis Workshop

ECON 440 - Shester, Katharine L.

Group workshop and seminar for students pursuing an honors thesis in Economics. Includes directed readings and research as well as presentations of Individual work.

Spring 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

EXPLORE CHILDHOOD SCANDINAVIA

ECON 239 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim) / Sigler, Haley W.

TOPIC:INTRO SUSTAIN DEVELOPMNT

ECON 295C - Casey, James F. (Jim)

HEALTH:SOCIAL SCI EXPLORATION

ECON 376 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

TOPIC: ADV MTHDS CAUS INFER

ECON 395A - Shester, Katharine L.