Course Offerings

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Negrete, Mario E.

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Smith, Chantal D.

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Grajzl, Peter

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

FS: First-Year Seminar

ECON 180 - Casey, James F. (Jim) / Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2021, ECON 180-01: FS: First-Year Seminar: The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work and Society (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing only.  This fall, millions of students will head off to start college, eager to understand more about themselves and the world they will work and live in. The technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution - voice and facial recognition, machine learning, and algorithms to guide predictions, all of which fall under the umbrella of artificial intelligence, and industrial robotics - are emerging as defining features of contemporary social and economic life.  This course explores the determinants and socioeconomic impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution through an economic lens, while also embracing and utilizing insights from other disciplines.  The full range of fundamental economic ideas and concepts found in a conventional course on the principles of micro and macroeconomics will be introduced, mastered, and drawn upon to facilitate our exploration.  Indeed, this course meets the requirement for economics courses that have Economics 100 as a pre-requisite.  Students will develop their analysis, writing, and presentation skills through readings, short compositions, essay exams, class discussion, and small group activities. (SS1) Goldsmith and Casey.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice Tianbo)

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Anderson, Michael A.

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time. Recommended for economics majors not later than their junior year.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Davies, Martin H.

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Economics of Education

ECON 236 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Investigation of the role of education on outcomes for both nations and individuals. Understanding of the factors in the education production function. Emphasis on the challenges of pre-K-12 education in the United States; secondary coverage of postsecondary education. Analysis of the effect of existing policies and potential reforms on the achievement and opportunities available to poor and minority students.

Economics of War and Peace

ECON 241 - Silwal, Shikha B.

In this course. we will look at the economic conditions and behaviors during periods of conflict. As such. the focus of the course is to develop a theoretical understanding of how human interaction can be modeled to study both peace and violent outcomes. To do so, we will view individuals' decision to be engaged in conflict as a rational choice. This viewpoint allows us to use economic principles to study individual behavior, design policies to alter those behaviors, and assess economic losses due to conflict. The topics covered in this class range from civil wars and genocide to international terrorism.

Development Economics

ECON 280 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295A - Alvarez, Camilo

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 295A-01: Special Topics in Economics: Economy of Latin America (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Why were many Latin American countries, which started with levels of development similar to those of the U.S. and Canada, not able to keep up?  This course reviews the historic and contemporary economic issues and development in the Latin America and Caribbean region. We will start with the policies, both domestic and foreign, undertaken during the colonial and post-Independence periods and see what effects they still have today. Next, we examine the post-WWII period, exploring subjects like the import substitution of the 1970s, the debt crises of the 1980s, and the structural reforms of the 1990s. Finally, we will look at the current state of the region, emphasizing the new macroeconomic challenges and contemporary domestic social problems. Topics discussed include income inequality and poverty, inflation, macroeconomic populism, dollarization, and the more recent debt crises and restructurings. Alvarez.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295A - Alvarez, Camilo

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 295A-02: Special Topics in Economics: Economy of Latin America (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Why were many Latin American countries, which started with levels of development similar to those of the U.S. and Canada, not able to keep up?  This course reviews the historic and contemporary economic issues and development in the Latin America and Caribbean region. We will start with the policies, both domestic and foreign, undertaken during the colonial and post-Independence periods and see what effects they still have today. Next, we examine the post-WWII period, exploring subjects like the import substitution of the 1970s, the debt crises of the 1980s, and the structural reforms of the 1990s. Finally, we will look at the current state of the region, emphasizing the new macroeconomic challenges and contemporary domestic social problems. Topics discussed include income inequality and poverty, inflation, macroeconomic populism, dollarization, and the more recent debt crises and restructurings. Alvarez.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 295B-01: Special Topics in Economics: Behavioral and Experimental Economics (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101.  The aim of the course will be to understand the notions of human behavior in everyday lives and its impact on markets. We will be taking the help of psychological insights to decipher why we overthink a bad outcome while undermining the possibility of a good outcome, what role does bias play when we place our bets in a casino or how do we create expectations in our minds regarding tomorrow's prices. We will be discussing policy prescriptions and analyzing case studies on how small changes in the environment can change human behavior so drastically. We will discuss the fundamentals of conducting laboratory and online experiments, which are valuable skill sets. Upadhyay.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 295B-02: Special Topics in Economics: Behavioral and Experimental Economics (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101.  The aim of the course will be to understand the notions of human behavior in everyday lives and its impact on markets. We will be taking the help of psychological insights to decipher why we overthink a bad outcome while undermining the possibility of a good outcome, what role does bias play when we place our bets in a casino or how do we create expectations in our minds regarding tomorrow's prices. We will be discussing policy prescriptions and analyzing case studies on how small changes in the environment can change human behavior so drastically. We will discuss the fundamentals of conducting laboratory and online experiments, which are valuable skill sets. Upadhyay.

Game Theory

ECON 302 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This course abandons the assumptions of perfect competition. Buyers and sellers may be few; information may be privately held; property rights may poorly enforced; externalities abound and uncertainty is the rule. Game theory is a general framework for analyzing the messy world of strategic interactions. Standard solution concepts such as Nash Equilibrium, subgame perfection, and Bayesian equilibrium are introduced in the context of a broad array of microeconomic topics. These include auctions, bargaining, oligopoly, labor market signaling, public finance and insurance. Class time combines lectures, problem-solving workshops, and classroom experiments.

Advanced Microeconomic and Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 310 - Davies, Martin H.

An introduction to the scope and tools of modern economic theory, including student applications of these theories. Equal time is spent examining topics, with the focus in microeconomics on examining sources of market failure (externalities, public goods, asymmetric information) and decision-making under uncertainty, and the focus in macroeconomics on constructing models of the demand-side and supply-side of the macroeconomy and on policy-setting in both the closed and open economy settings.

Advanced U.S. Economic History

ECON 344 - Shester, Katharine L.

This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy. The goals are to review some major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data. Major themes vary, but usually include: agriculture/environment; fertility; health; race; World War II; and urbanization. Students will read, discuss, and present empirical economic research papers, replicate results from select papers, and write original empirical research papers. 

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395A - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 395A-01: Special Topics in Economics: Environmental Valuation (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course focuses on advanced knowledge of environmental valuation techniques and how it can be used to inform policy decisions. Both theoretical models and empirical work are discussed. Work includes critiquing literature in the area of environmental valuation and empirical assignments. Kahn.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395B - Upadhyay, Sakshi

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2021, ECON 395B-01: Special Topics in Economics: Experimental Economics: Understanding Human Behavior (3).  Prerequisites: ECON 210 and ECON 203 or instructor consent as co-requisite. This course focuses on understanding human behavior in response to stimuli.  For example, why does the appearance of Tiger Woods in a Nike commercial instill customer faith?  Why are consumers confused by the long aisle of breakfast cereals at Walmart?  Theoretical and experimental studies of human behavior rely heavily on Economics and Psychology and have answered many such interesting questions.  Firms have noticed this research, and have responded with novel marketing decisions.  Other actors have also noticed.  For example, the research has influenced government advertisements aimed at increasing vaccination rates, lowering public smoking, saving electricity, etc.  Students become familiar with state-of-the-art research methodology in experimental economics, where they learn to conduct their own research projects by participating and designing experiments. Students also learn how to describe and interpret well-known results in experimental economics, alongside analyzing and critiquing experimental designs. Upadhyay .

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Shester, Katharine L.

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Bassiouny, Aliaa I.

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Honors Thesis Workshop

ECON 440 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Group workshop and seminar for students pursuing an honors thesis in Economics. Includes directed readings and research as well as presentations of Individual work. Must be taken in the senior year.

Spring 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Health: A Social Science Exploration

ECON 376 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Much of the work done by consulting companies, banks, insurance companies, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, etc., is based on applied statistical and econometric analysis. This course helps prepare students for careers in these environments using a hands-on approach and emphasizing the use of data and student-directed research in the specific context of health-related issues. Example of these issues include obesity, vaccinations, pre- and post-natal care, contraceptive use, or child mortality; possible determinants include poverty, education, or distance to the nearest health clinic or hospital. An interdisciplinary perspective is highlighted, as is the use and importance of quantitative analysis for public policy.

Winter 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Kaiser, Carl P.

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Yewell, Katherine G. (Katie)

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Shester, Katharine L.

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice Tianbo)

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

FS: First-Year Seminar

ECON 180 - Casey, James F. (Jim) / Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Winter 2021, ECON 180-01: FS: The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Future of Work and Society (4).  This fall, millions of students will head off to start college, eager to understand more about themselves and the world they will work and live in. The technologies of the 4th Industrial revolution - voice and facial recognition, machine learning, and algorithms to guide predictions, all of which fall under the umbrella of artificial intelligence, and industrial robotics - are emerging as defining features of the economic and social world they will encounter as students and in the labor force. The purpose of this course is to explore - the determinants and socioeconomic impact of - the fourth industrial revolution through an economic lens while also drawing on insights from other disciplines. Prompted by Samuelson - utilizing the full range of fundamental economic ideas and concepts found in a conventional course on the principles of micro and macroeconomics will be introduced, mastered, and drawn upon to facilitate our exploration of the 4th Industrial revolution. Although Samuelson was a visionary, he failed to recognize {articulate?} the benefits of simultaneously incorporating insights from other disciplines while learning the core forms of reasoning and analysis at the heart of conventional economics. This course will integrate relevant ideas from other disciplines with those of economics to provide students with a deeper - and richer - understanding of how the fourth industrial revolution is and will continue to shape and impact contemporary society. Goldsmith and Casey.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Grajzl, Peter

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time. Recommended for economics majors not later than their junior year.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Davies, Martin H.

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Money and Banking

ECON 215 - Hooks, Linda M.

A study of the fundamental principles of money, credit, and banking in the United States. Emphasis is on modern conditions and problems, with particular attention to the validity of monetary and banking theory in the present domestic and international situation.

Urban Economics

ECON 229 - Shester, Katharine L.

A study of the economics of cities. Students discuss why cities exist, what determines city growth, and how firms make city location decisions. We then shift our focus to within-city location decisions, and we discuss land-use patterns, housing, and neighborhoods. Our discussion of housing and neighborhoods focus on a number of issues related to urban poverty, including the effects of segregation and housing policies on the poor.

Health Economics

ECON 237 - Yewell, Katherine G. (Katie)

An overview of the determinants of health using standard microeconomic models to analyze individual behavior, markets, institutions, and policies that influence health and health care. The primary focus of the course is the United States but also includes comparisons to health systems in other developed countries and very limited coverage of developing countries. Particular emphasis is given to challenges faced by disadvantaged groups. The course includes an optional service-learning component with placements involving health issues and/or health care services in Rockbridge County.

Public Finance and Public Policy

ECON 250 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Public choices and the public economy. An inquiry into how the references of individuals and groups are translated into public sector economic activity. The nature of public activity and public choice institutions. The question of social balance. The effects of government expenditures and taxes on the economic behavior of individuals and firms.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

ECON 255 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.

Comparative Institutional Economics

ECON 281 - Grajzl, Peter

Institutions such as laws, the political system, and cultural norms embed all social activity. They structure economic, political, and social interaction and as such play a central role in facilitating (or hindering) economic development. This course's objective is to explore from a broad perspective how institutions affect economic performance, what the determinants of institutions are, and how institutions evolve. We study examples from the existing capitalist economies, the developing and transition countries, as well as the more distant history. Because the study of institutions is necessarily an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course combines the approach of economics with the insights from law, political science, history, and sociology.

Advanced Labor Economics

ECON 330 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

This course is an empirically advanced introduction to fundamental topics in the economic study of labor markets. We focus on labor supply, labor market equilibrium, investments in education, the distribution of labor income, and the effects of discrimination. Each part of the course provides a theoretical treatment of the respective topic followed by coverage of one or more academic research papers on that topic. Compared to most undergraduate labor economics courses, this course adopts a narrower topical focus in order to study, in depth, some primary research from the discipline. Students further develop their own quantitative research skills by writing two empirical papers.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395A - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Davies, Martin H.

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Anderson, Michael A. / Davies, Martin H. / Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Directed Individual Research

ECON 423 - Grajzl, Peter

Independent research culminating in an honors thesis. See the departmental website for requirements for honors in the major. Must be taken in the senior year.

Honors Thesis Workshop

ECON 440 - Davies, Martin H.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Group workshop and seminar for students pursuing an honors thesis in Economics. Includes directed readings and research as well as presentations of Individual work. Must be taken in the senior year.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

This course is required of honors candidates in economics.  An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Anderson, Michael A.

This course is required of honors candidates in economics.  An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Naven, Matthew (Matt)

This course is required of honors candidates in economics.  An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

This course is required of honors candidates in economics.  An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Grajzl, Peter

This course is required of honors candidates in economics.  An Honors Program is offered for qualified students; see the department head or the department web site for more information.