About the Minor

2022 - 2023 Catalog

Poverty and Human Capability Studies minor

A minor in poverty and human capability studies requires completion of seven courses as follows. In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student must use at least nine credits not also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor.

  1. POV 101 or 103
  2. POV 450 or 453
  3. At least 10 credits chosen from among the following or, when approved in advance, directed individual study or other courses that focus on poverty and human capability. The Shepherd Program website lists certain "related courses" that provide students substantial opportunity to address poverty and human capability (e.g., through a major project on a poverty-related topic). In order to meet this requirement, these "related courses" must be approved in advance by the director of the Shepherd Program and the course instructor.

    CBL 100
    CBSC 235
    ECON 229, 234, 235, 236, 237, 251, 280, 286 (SOAN 286)
    EDUC 369
    ENGL 260
    FILM 237S, 251
    HIST 254
    JOUR 240
    PHIL 242
    POL 215, 388
    POV 102, 191, 192, 193, 197 (maximum one credit), 202, 232, 241, 243 (PHIL 243), 245 (PHIL 245), 253 (SOAN 253), 257 (SOAN 257), 258 (SOAN 258), 280, 295 (LAW 221), 296, 401, 402, 403, 421, 422
    SOAN 222, 228, 263, 264, 266, 268 (POL 268), 278, 279, 286 (ECON 286), 288, 290, and, when approved in advance as appropriate, SOAN 276
  4. A capstone study that culminates in a major research paper on a topic proposed by the student that focuses on poverty and human capability. This course will typically be POV 423. It may be an independent study, senior thesis, honors thesis, or WGSS 396, when the research projects fit the criteria above and are co-advised by Shepherd Program faculty. These substitute courses must be approved in advance by the director of the Shepherd Program and by the participating instructors.
  1. Take one course from:
  2.  

    • POV 101 - Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisitehas not completed POV 103

      An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political and policy, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty but also considers poverty as a global problem.


    • or

    • POV 103 - Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction and Fieldwork
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisitehas not completed either POV 101 or POV 102

      An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects, and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political and policy, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty in the United States but also considers poverty as a global problem. This spring term version of the course integrates service fieldwork into the introductory course taught in the fall and winter and offers the same credit as POV 101 and 102 combined.


  3. Take one course from:
  4. POV 450 or 453

    • POV 450 - Shepherd Summer Internship
      Credits0
      PrerequisitePOV 101, POV 103, POL 215, or SOAN 268

      Supervised work with agencies in business and economic development, community organizing, education, environmental advocacy, health care, law, religious ministry, and social services that engage impoverished persons and communities. Eight weeks of full-time work is preceded by an orientation to prepare the interns to reflect critically on what they have learned. W&L students work with students from other participating colleges.


    • or

    • POV 453 - Shepherd Summer Internship
      Credits3

      Supervised work with agencies in business and economic development, community organizing, education, environmental advocacy, health care, law, religious ministry, and social services that engage impoverished persons and communities. Eight weeks of full-time work is preceded by an orientation to prepare the interns and followed by a closing conference for interns to reflect critically on what they have learned. W&L students work with students from other participating colleges. Students keep journals reflecting on their work. Financial support is available; in rare instances the Shepherd Program director may approve other internship programs to meet this requirement, but approval must be in advance with special conditions and stipulations.


  5. At least 10 credits chosen from among the following:
    • CBL 100 - Introduction to Community-Based Learning
      Credits3

      In this course, students learn the basics of community-engaged learning through working on projects and taking part in community service opportunities in Lexington and Rockbridge County. We discuss why community-based learning is a high-impact and civic-minded practice. Students acquire the needed dispositions, new ways of thinking, and skills necessary to succeed in a real-world collaboration with community stakeholders who have diverse backgrounds and stories. 


    • CBSC 235 - Effects of Poverty on Families and Children

      (PSYC 235)

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCBSC or PSYC 113 or POV 101

      This course explores the problem of child and family poverty, the issues it raises for psychologists and social policy makers, and the implications that poverty and social policy have for children's development. This class explores how children's perceptions of the world, or their place in it, are affected by economically stressed families.


    • ECON 229 - Urban Economics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      A study of the economics of cities. Students discuss why cities exist, what determines city growth, and how firms make city location decisions. We then shift our focus to within-city location decisions, and we discuss land-use patterns, housing, and neighborhoods. Our discussion of housing and neighborhoods focus on a number of issues related to urban poverty, including the effects of segregation and housing policies on the poor.


    • ECON 234 - Urban Education: Poverty, Ethnicity and Policy
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      Same as EDUC 369. Students explore the determinants of education achievement and attainment in urban education through three weeks of fieldwork in schools in the Richmond area (Monday through Thursday each week) and seminar meetings in Lexington. Students observe and work to understand critical components of teaching and learning in the urban classroom. The readings and experience challenge students to consider factors including early childhood development, the role of the family, school finance, teachers, and curriculum. The students then evaluate the current policy proposals for school reform in the United States such as teacher merit pay, charter schools, and student accountability. In addition, students develop and present their own policy proposal for improving public schools. Housing is provided through alumni in Richmond.


    • ECON 235 - The Economics of Social Issues
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      This seminar is based on readings that set out hypotheses developed by economists and other social scientists regarding the causes and consequences of a wide range of social problems. Evidence examining the validity of these hypotheses is scrutinized and evaluated. The course is writing intensive and interdisciplinary since readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, poverty, education, health, crime, race, ethnicity, immigration, and fiscal matters.


    • ECON 236 - Economics of Education
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      Investigation of the role of education on outcomes for both nations and individuals. Understanding of the factors in the education production function. Emphasis on the challenges of pre-K-12 education in the United States; secondary coverage of postsecondary education. Analysis of the effect of existing policies and potential reforms on the achievement and opportunities available to poor and minority students.


    • ECON 237 - Health Economics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      An overview of the determinants of health using standard microeconomic models to analyze individual behavior, markets, institutions, and policies that influence health and health care. The primary focus of the course is the United States but also includes comparisons to health systems in other developed countries and very limited coverage of developing countries. Particular emphasis is given to challenges faced by disadvantaged groups. The course includes an optional service-learning component with placements involving health issues and/or health care services in Rockbridge County.


    • ECON 251 - Women in the Economy
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      Students explore how economic theory and analysis can be applied to examine the multiple roles that women play in our society. In particular, we examine linkages and changes in women's human capital, marriage, fertility, family structure, and occupation and labor supply decisions in the post-World War II era. We also investigate the magnitude and causes of the gender wage gap. We assess how much of the gender wage gap can be explained by education and occupational choice, and how much appears to be due to discrimination. We also learn about {and try to explain} the differences in labor-market outcomes for women with and without children. Finally, we access the causes and consequences of teenage pregnancy and single motherhood.


    • ECON 280 - Development Economics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and ECON 102

      A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.


    • ECON 286 - Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History

      (SOAN 286)

      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      Same as SOAN 286. This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi ) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.


    • EDUC 369 - Urban Education and Poverty
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteEDUC 200, EDUC 210, ECON 236, POV 101, or any Education course numbered between 300 and 399

      Same as ECON 234. In this course, students explore pedagogy, curriculum, and social issues related to urban education by working in schools in the Richmond area for three weeks. Students read about and discuss the broader social and economic forces, particularly poverty, that have shaped urban schools and the ramifications of those forces for school design. The Richmond schools provide the opportunity to observe critical components of teaching and learning in the urban classroom. Housing is provided with alumni during the week. Students return to Lexington for Friday seminars and for the fourth week of the term for seminars and discussion.


    • ENGL 260 - Literary Approaches to Poverty
      FDRHL Literature Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisitecompletion of FDR:FW requirement

      Examines literary responses to the experience of poverty, imaginative representations of human life in straitened circumstances, and arguments about the causes and consequences of poverty that appear in literature. Critical consideration of dominant paradigms (the country and the city," "the deserving poor," "the two nations," "from rags to riches," "the fallen woman," "the abyss") augments reading based in cultural contexts. Historical focus will vary according to professor's areas of interest and expertise."


    • FILM 237S - Field Documentary
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent

      Experiential Learning. Taught by W&L faculty at the University of Cape Coast as part of the W&L in Ghana program. This course teaches students how to research, conceptualize and develop a non-fiction story idea into a film. Students receive instruction on effective research strategies, idea development, production planning, and proposal writing and pitching. They learn the theoretical, aesthetic, and technical principles of non-linear editing for documentary. Principally, students are taught how to: digitize and organize source material, create basic effects and titles, develop sequences, and organize and edit their raw materials into a polished final product. In addition to making films, we screen various documentaries, analyze the techniques, and put them to use in our own creation and editing.


    • FILM 251 - Ethnographic Study of Modern-Day Slavery in Ghana: Creating Short Documentary Film
      FDRHA Fine Arts Distribution
      Credits4
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      An examination of culture and social-justice issues in Ghana, particularly focusing on issues of modern- day slavery. Together, we study Ghanaian culture, visiting cultural sites and learning about how the country is faring with modern-day slavery. We collect true stories through ethnographic study, interviewing and filming to create short documentaries for presentation on campus at the end of the spring term. We examine the development of modern-day slavery in Ghana, visiting organizations and government programs that are working on the issue as well as listening to the stories of those who have been rescued from slavery.


    • HIST 254 - History of the U.S. Welfare State
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3

      A survey of the history of the U.S. welfare state from the 19th century through today. Topics include Social Security, welfare, the War on Poverty and Great Society, the Reagan-Era War on Welfare. Students analyze contemporary public-policy questions in their historical dimensions, and use historical knowledge to better understand contemporary political and policy debates.


    • JOUR 240 - Poverty in the Media
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteat least sophomore class standing

      An in-depth examination of portrayals of poverty, chiefly in the United States, from the late 19th century to the present through an intensive review of distinguished print journalism, nonfiction books, documentary film, and movies. By consulting social science literature as well, students gain a deeper understanding of the various conceptual paradigms through which poverty has been understood and explained.


    • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as WGSS 242. An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.


    • POL 215 - International Development
      FDRSS2 Social Science - Group 2 Distribution
      Credits3

      A study of international development and human capability, with a focus on Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The course analyzes theories to explain development successes and failures, with a focus on the structures, institutions, and actors that shape human societies and social change. Key questions include measuring economic growth and poverty, discussing the roles of states and markets in development, and examining the role of industrialized countries in reducing global poverty. The course explores links between politics and other social sciences and humanities.


    • POL 388 - Architecture of Urban Community
      FDRSS2 Social Science - Group 2 Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteany POL course numbered between 100 and 199

      This seminar investigates the literal and social architecture of democratic community in cities around the globe, examining how the physical spaces and political and economic power structures of urban life support or constrain the civic relationships of residents of varying backgrounds and unequal socioeconomic positions, shaping citizens' opportunities for collective empowerment and self-determination. Course addresses issues of poverty, exclusion, and environmental limits.


    • POV 102 - Introduction to Community-Based Poverty Studies
      Credits1
      PrerequisitePOV 101

      Sustained critical reflection on pivotal issues in poverty studies based on supervised volunteer work, journals, and weekly discussions and papers related to the readings in 101.


    • POV 191 - Blue Ridge Mile Clinic
      Credits1
      PrerequisitePOV 101

      This community-based learning course provides students with the preparation, instruction, reflection, and collaboration necessary to become respectful and effective student leaders in the Blue Ridge Mile Clinic, a collaboration with Virginia's Drive to Work Program and the local courts. Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of the systemic and unique individual challenges facing some of our local community members in the process of re-instating or obtaining a driver's license following an encounter with the court system.


    • POV 192 - Blue Ridge Mile Training
      Credits1

      This course provides students with the preparation and instruction necessary to become respectful and effective student leaders in the Blue Ridge Mile Clinic, a collaboration with Virginia's Drive to Work Program and the local courts. Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of the systemic and unique individual challenges facing some of our local community members in the process of re-instaing or obtaining a driver's license following an encounter with the court system. 


    • POV 193 - Blue Ridge Mile Clinic
      Credits1
      PrerequisitePOV 191 or POV 192

      This community-based learning course provides students with the opportunity to become respectful and effective student leaders in the Blue Ridge Mile Clinic, a collaboration with Virginia's Drive to Work Program and the local courts. Participants will meet with low-income and/or previously-incarcerated clients in a clinic setting, educate those clients about the steps required to obtain a driver's license or reinstate a driver's license that has been revoked following an encounter with the court system, and offer encouragement and assistance through the often-cumbersome and confusing process. Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of the systemic and unique challenges the clients may face in navigating the legal system and of the impact that having, or losing, a driver's license can have on myriad aspects of a person's life.


    • POV 197 - Bonner Program

      (no more than one credit)

      Credits1
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      This course is offered to members of the Bonner Program at Washington and Lee and provides structured learning activities related to students' local internships and related leadership training. Students commit to 8-10 hours of service per week through this internship model.


    • POV 202 - Respect, Community and the Civic Life
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      This course facilitates improved student understanding of the important intersections of community engagement, respect, and deepening conceptions of the civic life, and focuses on intentional synthesis of students' community engagement and community-based learning experiences (including POV 102, POV 453, and other discipline-based and co-curricular opportunities). Students consider what it means to live in community with others and explore topics of respect and responsibility on individual, institutional, and global scales in ways that unite their own experiences and questions with continued examination of the problems associated with poverty and marginality. A variety of perspectives are provided on what it means to live into the mission of Washington and Lee and the Shepherd Program as thoughtful, engaged citizens prepared to understand and address the causes and consequences of poverty in ways that respect the dignity of all. Students in this course engage in significant reflective work around their own community engagement experiences. As such, it is the expectation that all students enrolled engage in the Rockbridge Area through coursework, continuing community engagement, or other community-based learning opportunity.


    • POV 232 - Race, Class, and Education Policy
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePOV 101 or EDUC 200

      The course is an interdisciplinary examination of education policy questions that are of particular importance to understanding and addressing barriers to equitable opportunity for historically disadvantaged groups. The course focuses primarily on barriers for those in the United States who experience poverty as well as the distinct experiences of Black, Latino/a, and Native American peoples. Drawing on perspectives from experts in disciplines such as economics, sociology, education, and demography, the course examines issues in K-12 and post-secondary education. Through discussion, written assignments, and oral presentations, the course will promote further development of your ability to analyze and critique apply policy analysis to public policy debates.


    • POV 241 - Poverty, Ethics, and Religion
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as PHIL 241. This course introduces students to some of the most influential and compelling ethical arguments (both secular and religious) about our moral obligations regarding poverty. The course also examines the benefits and challenges of doing comparative religious and philosophical ethical analysis of a pressing moral and social problem. In particular, students will consider the arguments for and against including religiously inflected arguments in public deliberation about anti-poverty policy.


    • POV 243 - Martin Luther King Jr.: Poverty, Justice, and Love

      (PHIL 243)

      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as PHIL 243. This course offers students the opportunity to examine the ethics and theology that informed the public arguments about poverty made by one of the 20th century's most important social justice theorists and activists, Martin Luther King Jr., as well as the competing views of his contemporaries, critics, forebears, and heirs. The course asks the following questions, among others: How do justice and love relate to one another and to poverty reduction? What role should religion play in public discussions and policies about poverty and justice? Are the dignity and the beloved community King championed the proper goal of anti-poverty efforts?


    • POV 245 - Poverty, Dignity, and Human Rights

      (PHIL 245)

      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as PHIL 245. Is severe poverty a human rights violation? This course examines that question and others by means of an investigation of the main philosophical and religious debates about human rights. More broadly, the course provides students with the opportunity to examine our duties (individually and collectively) to those said to suffer from any human rights abuse. Questions considered include: Are human rights universal or culturally specific? What (if anything) grounds human rights? Are religious justifications of rights permissible in a pluralistic world? Is dignity a useful concept for defending and/or discerning human rights? Do we only have liberty rights (to be free of mistreatment) or do we also have welfare rights (to claim certain positive treatment from others)? What are the practical (moral, political. and legal) implications of identifying severe poverty as a human rights violation?


    • POV 253 - Narrating Our Stories: Culture, Society, and Identity

      (SOAN 253)

      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as SOAN 253. Use insights from sociology, anthropology, and the humanities, students uncover how cultural metaphors, socioeconomic inequalities, and global realities inform and shape our identities and experiences. By reading different story-telling formats, we work towards recognizing how the ways we tell our stories impact our ability to see new outcomes and reshape cultural scenarios for ourselves, our families, and our communities. We utilize the Inside-Out Model for class instruction and assignments.


    • POV 257 - Anthropology of Public Policy

      (SOAN 257)

      Credits3

      Same as SOAN 257. Traditionally, political scientists, economists, and even sociologists have mainly studied policy. In this course, we explore how anthropologists are uniquely positioned to read, understand, and interpret different policies and their effects through anthropological training. By using a variety of methods, anthropologists provide essential contributions to the field of public policy. We analyze how anthropologists have provided a unique perspective on problems caused particular policies, the success of some policies, the meanings policies hold for various types of actors, and the ways people engage with policies. Additionally, we learn how policies create social spaces and actors, manage populations, and transform political systems. Some of the policies we will discuss involve welfare, the family, the environment, humanitarianism, and immigration. We conclude by discussing ethical dilemmas related to the anthropology of policy. Upon completing this course, students will understand how anthropology contributes to the critique, analysis, and implementation of various types of policies.


    • POV 258 - Ethnographies of Global Poverty

      (SOAN 258)

      FDRSS2 Social Science - Group 2 Distribution
      Credits3

      Same as SOAN 258. When we research poverty, we tend to look first to large international organizations, such as the World Bank and United Nations, but given their emphases on data, statistics, and economic theory, we are left with an understanding of poverty without a human face. One rarely comes across discussions of global poverty derived from the everyday lives of people living in poverty. In this course, we learn about poverty through ethnographic accounts written by anthropologists. These accounts demonstrate that people living in poverty have names, ambitions, and histories, and their everyday lives are interconnected with our own in more ways than we imagine.


    • POV 280 - Poverty Law
      Credits3

      Historical and contemporary policy debates about poverty in the United States. Topics include the constitutional treatment of poverty, as well as the legal and policy treatment of questions of access to specific social goods, such as housing, health care, education, and legal services. Coverage of those topics include a look at the federalism dimensions of the legal approach to poverty in the United States. We also examine the intersection of the criminal justice system and poverty and touch on international perspectives on poverty.


    • POV 295 - Child Abuse and Neglect Seminar

      (LAW 221)

      Credits2

      This seminar examines the response of the legal system to issues of child abuse and neglect. Attempts by courts and legislators to define abuse and neglect are reviewed and critiqued. The seminar also explores the legal framework which governs state intervention to protect children from abuse and neglect. Attention is paid to both state and federal law, including the federal constitutional issues which arise in many child abuse and neglect proceedings. Issues relating to the professional responsibilities of lawyers involved in abuse and neglect proceedings are examined.


    • POV 296 - Special Topics in Poverty Studies
      FDRHU Humanities Distribution
      Credits3-4

      An intensive, in-depth examination of particular thinkers, approaches, policies or debates in the field of poverty and human capability studies.


    • SOAN 222 - Data Science Tools for Social Policy
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteOne of the following: SOAN 218, SOAN 219, INTR 202, ECON 202, DCI 202, BIOL 201, CBSC 250, or MATH 310; or instructor consent

      Students learn about how we think about and estimate causal effects, and practice important contemporary techniques with real data, culminating in reports analyzing the effects of a policy intervention of their choice.  All work will be done in R.  No previous experience with R is required, but some basic previous exposure to linear regression will be helpful.


    • SOAN 228 - Race and Ethnic Relations
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      An examination of why and how society creates and maintains racial and ethnic boundaries in the US. We discuss some of the crucial questions, which include: What conditions constitute a privileged group and an oppressed group? Why and how do racial/ethnic minority groups, the poor, and women experience discrimination, oppression, and exclusion in social life? Is there any racial discrimination against privileged racial/ethnic groups? How can ordinary people, policymakers, and social scientists contribute to improving race and ethnic relations among different social groups in the US?


    • SOAN 263 - Poverty and Marginality in the Americas
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      In recent decades, some global transformations have increased inequality and marginality in various regions of the world. Neoliberalism has generated both opportunities and challenges to human development In different countries. This course focuses on how the undermining of safety nets, the decline of models of economic growth centered on state intervention, and the internationalization of labor markets have affected societies in Latin America and the United States. Students analyze the structural causes of marginality and how the experience of poverty varies for people in both regions. We rely on anthropological and sociological studies to address key questions. How do disadvantaged individuals and families in the Americas deal with the challenges brought about by deindustrialization, violence, and environmental degradation? How do their communities struggle to sustain public life? What are the processes causing many people to migrate from one region to the other?


    • SOAN 264 - States, Data, and Population Policies in the Americas
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSOAN 101, SOAN 102, POV 101, or LACS 101

      While concentrating on the societies of the Americas, students focus on two of the main domains within which states seek to understand and influence populations: policies governing the collection of information about their residents, such as the census, and those governing migration. The course is made up of two interwoven parts, a traditional seminar portion that examines such policies from the perspective of historical sociology and a data-lab portion in which we perform exploratory visualization of historical and contemporary census and migration data from the region, using the "tidyverse" suite of R packages. We reflect critically on our own work, making use of perspectives afforded by the historical sociology portion of the course.


    • SOAN 266 - Neighborhoods, Culture, and Poverty
      FDRSS3 Social Science - Group 3 Distribution
      Credits3

      This course examines social-scientific research on the determinants of poverty, crime, and ill health by focusing on neighborhoods as the sites where many of the mechanisms impacting these outcomes operate. In addition to engaging with key readings and participating in seminar discussions, students conduct their own exploratory analyses of neighborhood level processes using a variety of spatial data analysis tools in R.


    • SOAN 268 - Migration, Identity, and Conflict

      (POL 268)

      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSOAN 102, POV 101, or POL 105

      Same as POL 268. This course focuses on the complex relationship between migration, political institutions, group identities, and inter-group conflict. The course is a hybrid of a seminar and research lab in which students (a) read some of the key social-scientific literature on these subjects, and (b) conduct team-based research making use of existing survey data about the integration of migrant populations into various polities.


    • SOAN 278 - Health and Inequality: An Introduction to Medical Sociology
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      This course introduces sociological perspectives of health and illness. Students examine topics such as social organization of medicine; the social construction of illness; class, race and gender inequalities in health; and health care reform. Some of the questions we address: How is the medical profession changing? What are the pros and cons of market-driven medicine? Does class have an enduring impact on health outcomes? Is it true that we are what our friends' eat? Can unconscious racial bias affect the quality of care for people of different ethnicities? What pitfalls have affected the way evidence-based medicine has been carried out?


    • SOAN 279 - Conceptions of Race and Health: Black & White=Gray
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      This seminar tackles the question of what is "race" and how does it affect health? In the United States, "race" is a concept frequently taken for granted. But what does "race" signify? Does race denote something inherently biological, cultural, or structural about one's ancestry, background, or lifestyle? Is race truly a stable "ascribed" characteristic that has predictive implications for peoples' everyday well-being? By specifically concentrating on the case study of health disparities for African-Americans in the United States, we explore the concept of "race", and how societal conceptions of race affect health policy, people's health outcomes, their access to healthcare, and their relationship to the medical establishment.


    • SOAN 286 - Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History

      (ECON 286)

      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or ECON 101

      Same as ECON 286. This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi ) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.


    • SOAN 288 - Childhood
      FDRSS4 Social Science - Group 4 Distribution
      Credits3

      This course explores the experience of childhood cross culturally, investigating how different societies conceptualize what it means to be a child. Our readings progress through representations of the lifecycle, starting with a discussion of conception, and moving through issues pertaining to the fetus, infants, children, and adolescents. We discuss socialization, discipline, emotion, education, gender, and sexuality, with special attention given to the effects of war, poverty, social inequality, and disease on children and youth.


    • SOAN 290 - Special Topics in Sociology
      Credits3-4

      A discussion of a series of topics of sociological concern.


    • and, when approved in advance as appropriate,

    • SOAN 276 - Art & Science of Survey Research
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSOAN 102

      This course is designed as a group research project in questionnaire construction and survey data analysis. Students prepare a list of hypotheses, select indicators, construct a questionnaire, collect and analyze data, and write research reports. When appropriate, the course may include service-learning components (community-based research projects).


    • or approved independent-study courses that focus on poverty and human capability; or other course offerings ("related courses" on the Shepherd website) that provide students substantial opportunity to address poverty and human capability (e.g., through a major project on a poverty-related topic). These "related courses" must be approved in advance by the director of the Shepherd Program and the course instructor.

    • POV 401 - Independent Study in Poverty and Human Capability Studies
      Credits1
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Students engage in a course of independent study in a topic relevant to poverty and human capability studies under the guidance of a Shepherd core or affiliate faculty member and with the permission of the Director of the Shepherd Program.


    • POV 402 - Independent Study in Poverty and Human Capability Studies
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required

      Students engage in a course of independent study in a topic relevant to poverty and human capability studies under the guidance of a Shepherd core or affiliate faculty member and with the permission of the Director of the Shepherd Program. The two-credit option requires two hours per week for 12 weeks or equivalent.


    • POV 403 - Independent Study in Poverty and Human Capability Studies
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Students engage in a course of independent study in a topic relevant to poverty and human capability studies under the guidance of a Shepherd core or affiliate faculty member and with the permission of the Director of the Shepherd Program. The three-credit option requires three hours per week for 12 weeks or equivalent.


    • POV 421 - Independent Research in Poverty and Human Capability Studies
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required

      Students engage in a course of independent research in a topic relevant to poverty and human capability studies under the guidance of a Shepherd core or affiliate faculty member and with the permission of the Director of the Shepherd Program. The one-credit option requires one hour per week for 12 weeks or equivalent.


    • POV 422 - Independent Research in Poverty and Human Capability Studies
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required

      Students engage in a course of independent research in a topic relevant to poverty and human capability studies under the guidance of a Shepherd core or affiliate faculty member and with the permission of the Director of the Shepherd Program. The two-credit option requires two hours per week for 12 weeks or equivalent.


  6. A capstone study that culminates in a major research paper on a topic proposed by the student that focuses on poverty and human capability
  7.  

    • POV 423 - Poverty and Human Capability: A Research Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePOV 101, POV 103, or POV 453; and at least junior class standing

      An inquiry into principal factors or agents responsible for the causes, effects, and remedies of poverty. This examination is conducted through reading appropriate in-depth studies from various disciplines and perspectives, and it culminates with an independent research project into specific aspects of poverty drawing on students' internships and respective areas of study and looking forward to their professional work and civic engagement. This seminar serves as a capstone for undergraduate poverty studies and includes second- and third-year law students in Law 391.


    • It may be an independent study, senior thesis, honors thesis, or:

    • WGSS 396 - Advanced Seminar in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteWGSS 120 and at least junior class standing

      This course provides an opportunity for advanced students to explore in detail some aspect of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.


    • when the research projects fit the criteria above and are co-advised by Shepherd Program faculty. These substitute courses must be approved in advance by the director of the Shepherd Program and by the participating instructors.