Physics and Engineering Degree Requirements

2023 - 2024 Catalog

We have the following degrees:

Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 63 credits:

  1. PHYS 111, 112; MATH 101, 102, 221, 332; ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378, 379
  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from ENGN 301+351 or ENGN 311+361
  3. Three additional courses chosen from ENGN 208, 240, 260, 267, 295, 301+351, 311+361, 312, 330, 395
  4. One four-credit laboratory course not used above chosen from
    • CHEM 110 or CSCI 121, or
    • 200 level or above from a list of approved courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, ENGN, GEOL, PHYS
  1. Required courses
  2.  

    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Sections meet either 3 or 4 days a week, with material in the latter presented at a more casual pace.


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 101 with a grade of C or greater or MATH 102 placement

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 102 with a grade of C or greater, MATH 222, or MATH 225

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with a grade of C or greater

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits4

      This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.


    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, and momentum.


    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits

      (PHYS 207)

      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 207. A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits.


    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering

      (PHYS 225)

      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and MATH 221

      Same as PHYS 225. Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 378 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 178, ENGN 204, ENGN 207, and ENGN 225; and ENGN 301 or ENGN 311; and ENGN 208, ENGN 240, ENGN 260, ENGN 267, ENGN 295, ENGN 301, ENGN 311, ENGN 312, ENGN 330, or ENGN 395. All courses with a grade of C or greater

      First term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The fall term is dedicated to the design and planning phases. This includes project topic selection; comprehensive study of necessary background material; and identification of design objectives, conceptual models, and materials and equipment needed.


    • ENGN 379 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 378 with a grade of C or greater

      Second term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The winter term is dedicated to implementation -- building, testing, analyzing, and revising the design, culminating with a public presentation and proof-of-concept demonstration.


  3. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from:
    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • or

    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


  4. Three additional courses chosen from:
    • ENGN 208 - Electronics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 207 or PHYS 207 with a grade of C or greater in either

      Same as PHYS 208. An introduction to digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of electronics systems. The first half of the course focuses on foundational concepts including: transistor/semiconductor technology, digital logic gates, RAM and Flash memory, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog converters, digital communication protocols (SPI and I2C), wireless devices, and microcontroller operation. The second half of the course is project-based: student teams develop an electronics system that solves a real world problem.


    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and PHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 240. A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.


    • ENGN 260 - Materials Science and Engineering
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 260. An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112

      Same as BIOL 267. Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


    • ENGN 295 - Intermediate Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3-4

      Intermediate work in bioengineering, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics or materials science.


    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • with

    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • with

    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


    • ENGN 312 - Heat Transfer
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332; and ENGN 311 with a grade of C or greater

      Principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include transient and steady state analysis, boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger analysis. Application of these principles to selected problems in engineering.


    • ENGN 330 - Mechanical Vibrations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 with a grade of C or greater

      Analysis of lumped parameter and continuous systems (free and forced, damped and undamped, single- and multi-degree-of-freedom); transient response to shock pulses; simple linear systems; exact and approximate solution techniques; and solution to continuous systems using partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 395 - Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3

      Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science, or additional upper-level engineering topics. Topics selected based on student interest.


  5. One four-credit laboratory course not used above chosen from:
    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory.


    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits4

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • or

      200 level or above from a list of approved courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, ENGN, GEOL, PHYS

Integrated Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in integrated engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 65 credits including the following. This major may not be combined with the major in engineering nor with a major in the respective department associated with the science track that a student selects for the IE major.

  1. PHYS 111, 112; MATH 101, 102, 221, 332; ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378, 379
  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from ENGN 301+351 or 311+361
  3. One course chosen from: ENGN 208, 240, 260, 267, 295, 301+351, 311+361, 312, 330, 395
  4. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • BIOL 111+113 and three BIOL courses 200 level or above
    • CHEM 110, 241, 242, and 261
    • CSCI 111, 112, and two CSCI courses 200 level or above
    • GEOL 100, 101, or 102 and three GEOL courses 200 level or above
  1. Required courses
  2.  

    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Sections meet either 3 or 4 days a week, with material in the latter presented at a more casual pace.


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 101 with a grade of C or greater or MATH 102 placement

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 102 with a grade of C or greater, MATH 222, or MATH 225

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with a grade of C or greater

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits4

      This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.


    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, and momentum.


    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits

      (PHYS 207)

      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 207. A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits.


    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering

      (PHYS 225)

      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and MATH 221

      Same as PHYS 225. Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 378 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 178, ENGN 204, ENGN 207, and ENGN 225; and ENGN 301 or ENGN 311; and ENGN 208, ENGN 240, ENGN 260, ENGN 267, ENGN 295, ENGN 301, ENGN 311, ENGN 312, ENGN 330, or ENGN 395. All courses with a grade of C or greater

      First term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The fall term is dedicated to the design and planning phases. This includes project topic selection; comprehensive study of necessary background material; and identification of design objectives, conceptual models, and materials and equipment needed.


    • ENGN 379 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 378 with a grade of C or greater

      Second term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The winter term is dedicated to implementation -- building, testing, analyzing, and revising the design, culminating with a public presentation and proof-of-concept demonstration.


  3. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from:
  4. .

    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • or

    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


  5. One course from:
    • ENGN 208 - Electronics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 207 or PHYS 207 with a grade of C or greater in either

      Same as PHYS 208. An introduction to digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of electronics systems. The first half of the course focuses on foundational concepts including: transistor/semiconductor technology, digital logic gates, RAM and Flash memory, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog converters, digital communication protocols (SPI and I2C), wireless devices, and microcontroller operation. The second half of the course is project-based: student teams develop an electronics system that solves a real world problem.


    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and PHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 240. A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.


    • ENGN 260 - Materials Science and Engineering
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 260. An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112

      Same as BIOL 267. Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


    • ENGN 295 - Intermediate Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3-4

      Intermediate work in bioengineering, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics or materials science.


    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • with

    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater
      CorequisiteENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • with

    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


    • ENGN 312 - Heat Transfer
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332; and ENGN 311 with a grade of C or greater

      Principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include transient and steady state analysis, boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger analysis. Application of these principles to selected problems in engineering.


    • ENGN 330 - Mechanical Vibrations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 with a grade of C or greater

      Analysis of lumped parameter and continuous systems (free and forced, damped and undamped, single- and multi-degree-of-freedom); transient response to shock pulses; simple linear systems; exact and approximate solution techniques; and solution to continuous systems using partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 395 - Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3

      Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science, or additional upper-level engineering topics. Topics selected based on student interest.


  6. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • Biology
      • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110 and first year standing. Upper division students must request an eligibility override
        CorequisiteBIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory

        An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism.


      • with

      • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits1
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110 and first year standing. Upper division students must request an eligibility override
        CorequisiteBIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology

        A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


      • and

        three BIOL courses 200 level or above

    • Chemistry
      • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits4

        This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory.


      • CHEM 241 - Organic Chemistry I
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110 with a grade of C+ or greater

        A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods.


      • CHEM 242 - Organic Chemistry II
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCHEM 241

        A continuation of CHEM 241.


      • CHEM 261 - Physical Chemistry: Quantum & Computational Chemistry
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110, MATH 102, and at least junior class standing

        An introduction to quantum mechanics as it applies to atomic and molecular systems. The emphasis is placed on spectroscopic methods and the modern picture of chemical bonding and molecular structure and computational methods.


    • Computer Science
      • CSCI 111 - Fundamentals of Programming I
        FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
        Credits4

        A disciplined approach to programming with Python. Emphasis is on problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and object-oriented concepts. Lectures and formal laboratories.


      • CSCI 112 - Fundamentals of Programming II
        FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCSCI 111

        A continuation of CSCI 111. Emphasis is on the use and implementation of data structures, introductory algorithm analysis, and object-oriented design and programming with Python.


      • and

        two CSCI courses 200 level or above

    • Earth and Environmental Geoscience

Physics major leading to BS degree

A major in physics leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 50 credits including the following.

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 207 (ENGN 207), 210, 225 (ENGN 225), 230, 265, 275, 285, 340, 345; and MATH 332
  2. One additional PHYS course at the 200- or 300-level
  3. One course chosen from PHYS 399, 473, 493 or three credits of research from PHYS 421, PHYS 422 or PHYS 423 followed by a 15-page research paper to be completed before graduation or from PHYS 451, PHYS 452 or PHYS 453 followed by a 15-page research paper to be completed before graduation. **
  4. Three additional credits chosen from the following:
    BIOL 280, 282, 283, 385
    CHEM 110, CHEM numbered 200 and above;
    CSCI 121, 211, 250;
    ENGN numbered 200 and above
    GEOL 211, 275, 311;
    MATH 303, 309, 310, 333, 345, 353
    PHYS numbered 200 and above

Additional courses possibly required as prerequisites for completion of the above include MATH 101, 102, and 221.

**The 15-page research paper requirement associated with PHYS 42x and 45x courses will be programmed as a non-course requirement referred to as the "Physics Research Paper".

  1. Required courses:
  2.  

    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


    • PHYS 207 - Electrical Circuits

      (ENGN 207)

      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as ENGN 207. A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits.


    • PHYS 210 - Modern Physics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112

      An introduction to the special theory of relativity and the physics of the atom. Topics in relativity include the Lorentz transformations, relativistic velocity addition, and relativistic momentum and energy. Topics in atomic physics include the wave description of matter, introductory quantum mechanics, the hydrogen atom, and the historical experiments that led to the modern theory.


    • PHYS 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering

      (ENGN 225)

      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and MATH 221

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • PHYS 230 - Newtonian Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 and MATH 221

      A thorough study of Newton's laws of motion, rigid body motion, and accelerated reference frames.


    • PHYS 265 - Modeling and Simulation of Physical Systems
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and MATH 102

      An introduction to the innovative field of modeling and analysis of complex physical systems from such diverse fields as physics, chemistry, ecology, epidemiology, and a wide range of interdisciplinary, emerging fields such as econophysics and sociophysics. Topics vary according to faculty expertise and student interest. The goal is to seek the underlying physics laws that govern such seemingly diverse systems and to provide contemporary mathematical and computational tools for studying and simulating their dynamics. Includes traditional lectures as well as workshops and computational labs, group presentations, and seminars given by invited speakers.


    • PHYS 275 - Electricity and Magnetism
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 225 or ENGN 225

      An introduction to the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields. The basic equations of electromagnetism (Maxwell's equations) are developed through a study of electrostatics, steady-state magnetism, and electromagnetic induction.


    • PHYS 285 - Optics
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 225 or ENGN 225

      A study of the properties of electromagnetic waves with special emphasis on visible light. Wave descriptions are developed for scattering, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Topics in geometrical optics are also studied, including lenses and aberration theory.


    • PHYS 340 - Quantum Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 210 and either PHYS 225 or ENGN 225

      A study of the postulates and formalism of quantum theory emphasizing the Schroedinger approach. The probabilistic theory is applied to one-dimensional bound and scattering states and the three-dimensional central force problem. Investigation of spin and angular momentum, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, indistinguishable particles, and perturbation theory. Mathematical formalism includes operators, commutators, Hilbert space, and Dirac notation.


    • PHYS 345 - Statistical Physics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 210 and either PHYS 225 or ENGN 225

      A study of the statistical methods used in various branches of physics. The Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distribution functions are derived and applied to problems in thermodynamics and the physics of solids.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with a grade of C or greater

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


  3. One additional PHYS course at the 200- or 300-level.
  4. One course chosen from PHYS-399, PHYS-473, PHYS-496, or three credits of research:
    • PHYS 399 - Capstone
      Credits3
      Prerequisite8 PHYS courses numbered 200 or greater and senior class standing

      The capstone course offers students the opportunity to synthesize and apply conceptual understanding and practical knowledge gained from previous coursework to conduct a feasible research project over a single term in a mentored learning environment


    • PHYS 473 - Senior Thesis
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Culminates in the writing of a thesis on original scholarship undertaken with the guidance of a faculty adviser. May also involve additional research in physics, individual or group conferences with the faculty adviser, literature review, interim reports, and dissemination activities.


    • PHYS 493 - Honors Thesis
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Honors Thesis.


    • PHYS 421 - Directed Individual Research
      Credits1
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Directed research in physics.


    • PHYS 422 - Directed Individual Research
      Credits2
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Directed research in physics.


    • PHYS 423 - Directed Individual Research
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      Directed research in physics.


  5. Three additional credits chosen from the following:
    • BIOL 280 - Neural Imaging
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 220

      This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, the course examines how some of the important molecular growth and differentiation cues (e.g., growth factors) can transmit signals important for axon growth and survival of developing and mature neurons. Topics may include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and regeneration. Students will conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools.


    • BIOL 282 - Modeling and Simulations in Public Health
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteMATH 101

      Where are infections spreading? How many people will be affected? What are some different ways to stop the spread of an epidemic? These are questions that all of us ask during an outbreak or emergency. In a process known as modeling, scientists analyze data using complex mathematical methods to provide answers to these and other questions during an emergency response. Models provide the foresight that can help decision-makers better prepare for the future. In this course you will learn how to develop a simple mathematical models using data. You will learn basic epidemiological concepts, computational data analysis tools and relevant mathematical techniques to integrate existing data into the model and generate relevant predictions. In an open-ended project, you and several of your classmates will develop a model and recommendation about potential public health threat. No prior programming experience required - you will learn to use Python, a popular open-source programming language and Jupyter Notebook data analysis environment, to interactively explore data.


    • BIOL 283 - Pregnancy: A KISS in Time?
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and BIOL 113

      Kisspeptin (KISS) is a neuropeptide that controls reproductive maturation and function. Its adequate secretion is essential for correct reproductive function and successful pregnancy. Recent experimental studies have shown that KISS may act as a central integrator for other reproductive hormones and neuropeptides. For example, KISS stimulates release of the hormone prolactin (PRL), which helps to maintain pregnancy and prepare the body for lactation. In this class ,students determine the role that KISS plays in successful pregnancy using computational modeling. Students experience the world of computational modeling in neuroendocrinology by working in teams to investigate and extend an existing model for hormonal interaction between KISS and PRL in pregnancy in rats. The model will be used to generate experimentally tested predictions.


    • BIOL 385 - Molecular Mechanics of Life
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 220

      How do we study complex networks of interactions between molecules in cells? How do we discover what roles different molecular machines play in the development and behavior of cells and animals? How can we identify the ways in which medical illness is caused by the misregulation of biological complexes because of a pathogenic infection or genetic disease? Our approach to answering these questions reflects the same interdisciplinary strategy being used at the forefront of current biomedical research. We consider the ways in which traditional approaches in biochemistry, genetics and cell biology can be merged with new systems-level approaches such as genomics and proteomics, to allow us to probe the underlying molecular mechanics of life. In the classroom, we examine different molecular networks, while readings include selections from the primary literature. The laboratory is based on an investigation of a novel research question, designed and addressed by student participants.


    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory.


    • CHEM numbered 200 and above

    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits4

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • CSCI 211 - Algorithm Design and Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112 and either MATH 121, MATH 201, or MATH 225

      Methods for designing efficient algorithms, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and greedy algorithms. Analysis of algorithms for correctness and estimating running time and space requirements. Topics include advanced data structures, graph theory, network flow, and computational intractability.


    • CSCI 250 - Introduction to Robotics
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112

      This course combines readings from the contemporary robotics literature with hands-on lab experience building robots (equipment provided) and programming them to do various tasks. The lab experience culminates with a peer-judged competition of robot projects proposed and built during the second half of the term.


    • ENGN numbered 200 and above

    • MATH 303 - Complex Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221

      Algebra of complex numbers, polar form, powers, and roots. Derivatives and geometry of elementary functions. Line integrals, the Cauchy Integral Theorem, the Cauchy Integral formula, Taylor and Laurent Series, residues, and poles. Applications.


    • MATH 309 - Probability
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with a grade of C or greater

      Probability, probability density and distribution functions, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous random variables, and moment generating functions.


    • MATH 310 - Mathematical Statistics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 309

      Sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.


    • MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332

      An introduction to the study of boundary value problems and partial differential equations. Topics include modeling heat and wave phenomena, Fourier series, separation of variables, and Bessel functions. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • MATH 345 - Calculus on Manifolds
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and MATH 222

      This course builds on material from both multivariable calculus and linear algebra. Topics covered include: manifolds, derivatives as linear transformations, tangent spaces, inverse and implicit function theorems, integration on manifolds, differential forms, and the generalized Stokes' Theorem.