Course Offerings

Spring 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Muslims in the Movies

HIST 172 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

An examination of the history of visual representation of Islam and Muslims in classical and modern cinema. We approach movies produced by both Muslims and non-Muslims over the last century as historical sources: visual monuments that have captured the specific cultural and political context in which they were produced. We examine a selection of these movies through the lens of critical theory and the study of religion in order to pay attention to how questions surrounding identity and representation, race and gender, Orientalism and perceptions of difference have historically influenced and continue to influence cinematic images of Islam.

The Art of Command during the American Civil War

HIST 244 - Myers, Barton A.

This seminar examines the role of military decision-making, the factors that shape it and determine its successes and failures, by focusing on four Civil War battles: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Wilderness. Extensive reading and writing. Battlefield tours.

Morning in America? Society, Culture and Politics in The Age of Reagan

HIST 264 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of the United States during the Reagan presidency. While the bulk of the course focuses on the 1980s, it also provides an overview of the 1960s and 1970s as well as the legacy of the decade for contemporary America. Rather than studying a single theme across a long period of time, this class provides students with a variety of thematic approaches within a more confined time-period. Accordingly, while the focus is on national politics, we explore the impact of the decade on economic, social, cultural, diplomatic, and political history.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - Dennie, Nneka D. / Kamara, Mohamed

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2022, HIST 269A-01: Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History: Slavery and Colonialism in the African Diaspora (4).
The histories, politics, and cultures of various regions have given shape to the global African diaspora, at times producing continuities and at others, points of departure. Two constants, however, are the prevalence of colonialism and slavery, particularly in Africa and the Caribbean. This class will examine the impacts that colonialism and slavery have had on colonized peoples, as well as the linkages between African and Caribbean history, by traveling to Barbados and Martinique—a former British colony and a former French colony. Particular points for consideration include colonial systems of governance, such as direct rule and indirect rule, as well as the contemporary legacies of colonialism and slavery, including movements for reparations. (HU, EXP, GL) Dennie and Kamara.

Winter 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European History, 325-1492

HIST 100 - Vise, Melissa E.

An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.

European History, 1789 to the Present

HIST 102 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The French Revolution and Napoleon, the era of nationalism, the rise of socialism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and European Union.

Japan: Origins to Atomic Aftermath

HIST 104 - Bello, David A.

This course traces the span of Japan's historical development from its origins through the Cold War, with a special, but not exclusive, emphasis on an environmental perspective. The first half of the course covers the emergence of indigenous Japanese society and its adaptation to cultural and political influences from mainland East Asia, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Chinese concepts of empire. The second half covers Japan's successful transition from a declining Tokugawa Shogunate to a modern imperial nation to a reluctant U.S. Cold War ally from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Sammons, Franklin

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

African History Since 1800

HIST 176 - Ballah, Henryatta L.

Examination of the history and historiography of Africa from the abolition of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present. Topics include precolonial states and societies, European colonial intrusions and African responses, development of modern political and social movements, decolonization, and the history of independent African nation-states during the Cold War and into the 21st century.

France Since the Revolution

HIST 209 - Horowitz, Sarah

Historical study of France from the Revolution through the present, tracing France's revolutionary tradition and the continuing "Franco-French" war it spawned, and the construction of and challenges to French national identity. Topics include the successive revolutions of the 19th century, the acquisition and loss of two empires, and the transformations in French society brought by wars, industrialization, and immigration.

Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1991

HIST 221 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The revolutions of 1917, the emergence of the Soviet system, the Stalinist period, Stalin's successors, and the eventual collapse of the USSR.

International Relations, 1919-2000: The End of European Hegemony

HIST 224 - Patch, William L. (Bill)

Topics include the Versailles peace settlement of 1919, the spread of the British Empire to the Middle East and birth of Palestinian nationalism, the impact of the Great Depression and totalitarianism on international relations, the outbreak of the Second World War, the Holocaust and foundation of the State of Israel, the Nuremberg Trials, decolonization in Africa and Asia, the origins of the Cold War, and the foundation of the European Economic Community. What have Europeans learned about conflict resolution from their experience of two world wars and numerous colonial wars?

Topics in European History

HIST 229A - Patch, William L. (Bill)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

 

The Evolution of American Warfare

HIST 243 - Myers, Barton A.

This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the course limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. All three of these themes relate to the central goal of this course, which is to gain a better understanding of how America's military developed in conjunction with and sometimes in conflict with American democracy.

Saints and Sinners in the Puritan Atlantic

HIST 250 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

This class explores the history of Puritans—a term that was itself derisive— on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as the legacy of Puritanism in Britain and America. Topics covered include the development of Puritanism after the English Reformation, the settlement of Massachusetts, the trial of Anne Hutchinson, relationships with Native Americans, the English Civil War and rule of Oliver Cromwell, and the infamous Salem Witch Trials. Throughout, we will pay special attention to the relationship between religion and politics, the role of gender in Puritan life and theology, the nature of transatlantic ideas and communication, and popular practice versus orthodoxy. 

England in the Age of Shakespeare

HIST 255 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

This class uses the dates of Shakespeare's life (1564-1616) as our chronological frame to explore the history of England during the profoundly important reigns of Elizabeth I and James VI and I. Together we examine the era of personal monarchy and the growing resistance of parliament, the encounters with "others" beyond England's shores, the relationship between gender and power, the spread of religious convictions and contradictions, colonialism and the beginnings of the British Empire, and the great literary and artistic figures of the day. We also investigate what life was like for the average men and women who lived and died during England's "golden age." 

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - Dennie, Nneka D.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, HIST 269A-01: Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History: History of the Civil Rights Movement (3).
This course will examine the trajectory of the Civil Rights Movement by focusing on particular events, strategies, organizations, and political actors. After identifying the conditions that contributed to the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement, the course will trace the movement from the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board case to the rise of Black Power during the 1970s. The course will conclude by examining the relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. (HU) Dennie.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269B - Dennie, Nneka D.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, HIST 269B-01: Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History: Thugs, Jezebels, and Contemporary Politics (3).
In the months prior to the 2016 presidential election, race relations in the United States were propelled into the American public consciousness with great force, although race has continually exerted an omnipresent influence on contemporary politics. Beginning with Clarence Thomas's 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings, this course will survey how discourse on Black femininity, masculinity, sexuality, and class has impacted American politics from 1991 to the present. Topics for consideration include welfare reform, reproductive justice, mass incarceration, voter suppression, and white nationalism. Readings will also consider how Black activists and Black public figures such as lawyers, journalists, and politicians have responded to and resisted racism and sexism in contemporary politics. (HU) Dennie.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269C - Sammons, Franklin

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, HIST 269C-01: Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History: The Indigenous South (3).
This course is about Indigenous southerners and the region they have long inhabited. It is a chronically broad course that will focus primarily on the history of Indigenous people and nations in the Southeast from the pre-contact period to the present. Comprised of diverse peoples, speaking different languages, and with a range of customs and beliefs, the people of the Native South nevertheless share common cultural traditions, social systems, and histories. In this class will examine the Mississippian mound building civilizations; Native southerners encounters with Europeans; the American Revolution, Civil War, and Jim Crow as seen and experienced in the Native Southeast; and contemporary struggles for Native sovereignty in Virginia. Students will learn about the experiences of Indigenous southerners throughout southern history and in the present; be introduced to the methodologies used by ethnohistorians and in the discipline of Native American and Indigenous Studies that are used to recover Indigenous perspectives and history; develop a final project that explores Indigenous history and erasure in and around Rockbridge County. (HU) Sammons.

Islam in America: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

HIST 271 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

From the discourse on the War on Terror, to debates about Muslim women's dress, Islam in America has attracted the attention of journalists, activists, government officials, and scholars of religion. This course takes a critical-historical approach to the topic by examining key themes in the history of Islam in America: the lives of enslaved African Muslims in the Antebellum period and the Founding Fathers' visions of Islam; the immigrant experience of Arab Muslims at the turn of the 20th century; the role of Muslim organizations in the Civil Rights movement; and, the changing representations of American Muslims after the Gulf War and post-9/11. In interrogating the history of Islam in America, we specifically pay attention to the ways in which religion, gender, class, race, and citizenship continue to inform representations of Muslims in the U.S.

Seminar: The Yin and Yang of Gender in Late Imperial China (10th-19th centuries)

HIST 285 - Bello, David A.

Relations between men and women are the basis of any human society, but the exact nature and interpretation of these relations differ from time to time and from place to place. The concepts of Yin (female) and Yang (male) were integral to the theory and practice of Chinese gender relations during the late imperial period, influencing marriage, medicine and law. This course examines the historical significance of late-imperial gender relations across these, and other, categories from both traditional and modern perspectives.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, HIST 295A-01: Topics: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic (3). This course investigates the Roman Republic from its foundation after the overthrow of the last Roman king to its transformation into the Roman empire.  Topics covered will include the Conflict of the Orders, Rome's early expansion, the Punic Wars, the reforms of the Gracchi brothers, and the careers of powerful generals seeking to dominate the state like Marius, Sulla, and Julius Caesar.  Students will read and analyze some of the most important historical sources from the era, including Livy, Polybius, Plutarch, Sallust, Caesar, and Cicero. (HU) Halsted.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2022, HIST 295A-02: Topics: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic? (3). This course investigates the Roman Republic from its foundation after the overthrow of the last Roman king to its transformation into the Roman empire.  Topics covered will include the Conflict of the Orders, Rome's early expansion, the Punic Wars, the reforms of the Gracchi brothers, and the careers of powerful generals seeking to dominate the state like Marius, Sulla, and Julius Caesar.  Students will read and analyze some of the most important historical sources from the era, including Livy, Polybius, Plutarch, Sallust, Caesar, and Cicero. (HU) Halsted.

Seminar on Nazism and the Third Reich

HIST 312 - Patch, William L. (Bill)

Common readings introduce students to some of the most lively debates among scholars about the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by the Nazis in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported this regime's policies of war and racial persecution. Students develop a research topic related to one of these debates for analysis in a substantial research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.

Seminar on The United States, 1840-1860

HIST 344 - Myers, Barton A.

An intensive examination of the sectional conflict: the Mexican War, Manifest Destiny, slavery and the territories, the abolition movement, the failure of compromise, and secession. Emphasis on the study of primary sources and class discussion of assigned reading.

Terrorism in Contemporary Africa

HIST 377 - Ballah, Henryatta L.

In the heightened age of globalization, Africa is becoming more integral to the U.S. war on terror. The 1998 bombings of U.S. Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, the 2013 deadly terrorist mall attack in Kenya and recent attacks in Nigeria by Boko Haram have brought Africa into the mainstream discussion on global terrorism. In this course, we will examine the period from 1940, when discourse about terrorism in Africa began to appear in western media to the present. Utilizing primary and secondary sources, we will address questions such as, what factors give rise to terrorism in Africa?

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Ballah, Henryatta L.

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Horowitz, Sarah

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Patch, William L. (Bill)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms

HIST 103 - Bello, David A.

China's history embodies the full range of experience -as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperial aggression, dissident member of the cold war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Myers, Barton A.

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Sammons, Franklin

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

History of Africa to 1800

HIST 175 - Ballah, Henryatta L.

Examination of the history and historiography of Africa from the origins of humankind to the abolition of the trans- Atlantic slave trade. Topics include human evolution in Africa, development of agriculture and pastoralism, ancient civilizations of the Nile, African participation in the spread of Christianity and Islam, empires of West Africa, Swahili city-states, and African participation in the economic and biological exchanges that transformed the Atlantic world.

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180 - Sammons, Franklin

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2021, HIST 180-01: FS: First-Year Seminar: The History of American Capitalism: From Colonization to Crypto (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. What is capitalism, how did it develop in the United States, and how have historians studied it? These are the principal questions that will guide this course on the history of American capitalism from the colonial period to the present. To understand capitalism in its historical context, we will examine its relationship to the social, cultural, technological, environmental, and political changes that have defined American history: settler colonialism, slavery, industrialization, ecological transformation, consumerism, and more. Throughout, we will consider enduring questions about the relationships between economic growth and inequality, dynamism and instability, opportunity and exploitation. Each week you will read historical scholarship and examine primary sources not only to better understand American capitalism, but to develop your ability to sort and evaluate evidence, to make arguments, and to interpret the past. (HU) Sammons.

 

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2021, HIST 195A-01: Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores: Romans and Barbarians (3).  This course investigates the world of Late Antiquity (200-800 AD) by looking at the relationship between "Romans" and "barbarians."  Exploring the transformation between the late Roman empire and the Early Middle Ages, we will interrogate questions of identity and ethnicity to reframe the political, institutional, and cultural changes in this critical period in European history.  Students will examine famous events like the Crisis of the Third Century, the conversion of the Roman empire to Christianity, the "fall of Rome," the foundation of Islam, and the establishment of the Frankish empire. (HU) Halsted.

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195A - Halsted, Christopher S. (Chris)

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2021, HIST 195A-02: Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores: Romans and Barbarians (3).  This course investigates the world of Late Antiquity (200-800 AD) by looking at the relationship between "Romans" and "barbarians."  Exploring the transformation between the late Roman empire and the Early Middle Ages, we will interrogate questions of identity and ethnicity to reframe the political, institutional, and cultural changes in this critical period in European history.  Students will examine famous events like the Crisis of the Third Century, the conversion of the Roman empire to Christianity, the "fall of Rome," the foundation of Islam, and the establishment of the Frankish empire. (HU) Halsted.

Gender & Sexuality in Modern Europe

HIST 206 - Horowitz, Sarah

This course investigates the history of Europe from the late 18th century to the present day through the lens of women's lives, gender roles, and changing notions of sexuality. We examine how historical events and movements (industrialization, the world wars, etc.) had an impact on women, we look at how ideas about gender shaped historical phenomena, such as imperialism and totalitarianism. We also consider the rise of new ideas about sexuality and the challenge of feminism.

History of the British Isles to 1688: Power, Plague, and Prayer

HIST 217 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

The history of the British Isles to 1688 tells the story of how an island remote from the classical world came to dominate much of the modern one. This course ventures from Britain during Roman occupation and Anglo-Saxon migration, to the expansion of the Church and tales of chivalry during the Middle Ages, then finally to exploration and conflict during the Tudor and Stuart dynasties. Topics include the development of Christianity, Viking invasions, the Scottish wars of independence, the evolution of parliament, the Black Death, the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation, the beginnings of Empire, and the 17th-century revolutions. 

The Reformation in Britain: Blood, Sex, and Sermons

HIST 225 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

The Reformation of the 16th century shattered the once unitary religious cultures of England and Scotland. Although important continuities remained, the introduction of Protestantism wrought dramatic effects in both countries, including intense conflict over nature of salvation, the burning of martyrs, the hunting of witches, religious migrations, a reorientation of foreign policy, changes in baptismal and burial practices, and more. Students explore these changes and the lives and legacies of some of history's most fascinating figures, from Henry VIII and Thomas Cromwell in England to Mary Queen of Scots and John Knox in Scotland, while also constantly asking how ordinary English and Scottish men and women experienced the Reformation and its aftermath.

Discovering W&L's Origins Using Historical Archaeology

HIST 230 - Gaylord, Donald A.

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 181 with the same description. This course introduces students to the practice of historical archaeology using W&L's Liberty Hall campus and ongoing excavations there as a case study. With archaeological excavation and documentary research as our primary sources of data. we use the methods of these two disciplines to analyze our data using tools from the digital humanities to present our findings. Critically, we explore the range of questions and answers that these data and methods of analysis make possible. Hands-on experience with data collection and analysis is the focus of this course, with students working together in groups deciding how to interpret their findings to a public audience about the university's early history. The final project varies by term but might include a short video documentary. a museum display, or a web page.

The American Civil War

HIST 245 - Myers, Barton A.

The sectional crisis. The election of 1860 and the secession of the southern states. Military strategy and tactics. Weapons, battles, leaders. Life of the common soldier. The politics of war. The economics of growth and destruction. Emancipation. Life behind the lines. Victory and defeat.

 

The History of the African-American People since 1877

HIST 260 - Dennie, Nneka D.

An intensive study of the African-American experience from 1877 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of black intellectual and cultural traditions, development of urban communities, emergence of the black middle class, black nationalism, the civil rights era, and the persistence of racism in American society.

Building a Suburban Nation: Race, Class, and Politics in Postwar America

HIST 268 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

Together, the overdevelopment of the suburbs and the underdevelopment of urban centers have profoundly shaped American culture, politics and society in the post-WWII period. This course examines the origins and consequences of suburbanization after 1945. Topics include the growth of the national state, the origins and consequences of suburbanization, the making of the white middle class, the War on Poverty, welfare and taxpayers "rights" movements, "black power," and how popular culture has engaged with questions about race and class. In the process of understanding the historical roots of contemporary racial and class advantage and disadvantage, this course will shed new light on contemporary public policy dilemmas.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - Dennie, Nneka D.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2021, HIST 269A-01: Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History: Introduction to Black Women's History (3). 
What happens when American history is narrated by Black women and through Black women's experiences? How might we understand US history if we locate Black women at the center rather than the peripheries? These questions provide the guiding framework for this course. This course will trace African American women's history from slavery to the present. Particular attention will be devoted to Black women's labor, activism, intellectual thought, and cultural productions. We will also consider how race, gender, class, and sexuality have functioned in Black women's lives. (HU) Dennie.

African Women in Comparative Perspective

HIST 275 - Ballah, Henryatta L.

In this course, we will widen our appreciation of African Women's experiences, including history, legal and socio-economic status, religious and political roles, productive and reproductive roles, and the impact of colonialism and post-independence development and representation issues. The course will move across time and space to examine the aforementioned in pre-colonial, colonial and 'post'-colonial Africa. We will begin with the question: What common beliefs/images about African women did/do Euro-Americans share?

Picturing Muhammad? Perceptions of the Prophet from the Hijra to Hip-Hop

HIST 282 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

To Muslims, Muhammad is a prophetic figure whose model life is to be emulated; to non-Muslims, a controversial figure that has stirred the imagination for centuries. Through an analysis of the earliest non-Muslim sources on Muhammad, to insider Muslim narratives of the prophet's miraculous life, to polemical medieval Christian stories about him, to Deepak Chopra and Muhammad in hip-hop, this course explores the various historical, literary, and media representations of Muhammad. We will pay special attention to recent controversies on visual depictions of Muhammad, as well as contemporary ritual practices surrounding the embodiment of Islam's most important prophet.

Seminar: The French Revolution

HIST 309 - Horowitz, Sarah

The French Revolution is one of the most fascinating and momentous events in European history. At once "the best of times" and "the worst of times," the Revolution was both the origin of modern democracy and a period of tremendous political violence - indeed, some say it is the origins of totalitarianism. In this seminar, we study the following questions: What are the origins of the Revolution? How did a revolution that began with proclamations of human rights turn into one of mass bloodshed in just a few short years? How did a desire for democracy lead to political violence? What was the nature of the Terror, and how can we understand it? We also examine how various schools of history have interpreted the Revolution, as well as the legacy of the Revolution.

Seminar: Cold War Politics and Culture

HIST 350 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

This seminar offers a topical survey of the popular culture, social changes, and domestic politics of the Cold War United States. Themes covered in this course include the dawn of the atomic age, the social and cultural anxieties produced by the Cold War, the privatization of suburban family life, the problems of historical memory, the boundaries of political dissent, and the relationship between international and domestic politics. This course pays special attention to how popular culture responded to, interpreted, and shaped key episodes in the recent national past.

Seminar: Managing Mongols, Manchus, and Muslims: China's Frontier History (16th-20th Centuries)

HIST 386 - Bello, David A.

The unprecedented expansionism of China's last dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911), produced an ethnically and geographically diverse empire whose legacy is the current map and multiethnic society of today's People's Republic of China. The Qing Empire's establishment, extension and consolidation were inextricably bound up with the ethnic identity of its Manchu progenitors. The Manchu attempt to unify diversity resulted in a unique imperial project linking East, Inner and Southeast Asia. This course explores the multiethnic nature and limits of this unification, as well as its 20th-century transformations.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Horowitz, Sarah

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.

 

Senior Thesis

HIST 473 - Patch, William L. (Bill)

This course serves as an alternative for HIST 493. Please consult the department head for more details.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Horowitz, Sarah

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Patch, William L. (Bill)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .