Course Offerings Descriptions Fall Term 2020


Introduction to Environmental Studies

ENV 110 - Humston, Robert, Fisher, Chelsea R.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Required
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

An interdisciplinary introduction to environmental studies with an emphasis on how societies organize themselves through their social, political and economic institutions to respond to environmental problems. The course begins with a discussion of the development of environmental thought, focusing on the relationship between humans and the environment. Participants then discuss alternative criteria for environmental decision making, including sustainability, equity, ecological integrity, economic efficiency, and environmental justice. The course concludes with an examination of contemporary environmental issues, including global warming, invasive species, energy and the environment, tropical deforestation, and the relationship between the environment and economic development in developing countries.

Environmental Service Learning

ENV 111 - Hodge, Kimberly S. (Kim)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Required
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Practical application of student knowledge of environmental issues based on supervised volunteer work in the greater Rockbridge community. Students will participate in a service-learning environment. Topics will include environmental education, campus sustainability, conservation and sustainable agriculture in the surrounding region. The course culminates with a paper integrating students' knowledge with practical application throughout the term.

Environmental Humanities

ENV 203 - Fisher, Chelsea R.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities (substitution)
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Humanities (substitution)
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

An introduction to the examination of human-environment relationships arising from the humanities, this course draws broadly upon the fields of philosophy, history, cultural anthropology, eco-criticism, art and art history, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Students receive a broad introduction to humanist perspectives on environmental challenges and solutions and preparation for examining specific fields in greater depth later in their studies.

Seminar in Environmental Ethics

ENV 365 - Cooper, Gregory J. (Greg)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities/Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Humanities (Phil/Eth) Environmental Economics (Ethics) Water Resources (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

This course examines selected topics in environmental ethics. Topics may vary from year to year, and include the proper meanings and goals of environmentalism; the goals and methods of conservation biology; major environmental issues in current political debates; and balancing the ethical concerns of environmental justice and our responsibilities to future generations.Fall 2020, ENV 365-01: Seminar in Environmental Ethics (3).  We tend to justify our environmental decisions in terms of a narrow set of fundamental values. These values include humanistic values such as sustainability, environmental justice and economic growth and more ecologically oriented values such as biodiversity, ecosystem resilience, and ecological integrity. Unfortunately, these values are often understood at a very superficial level that undermines the justifications that appeal to them. Our ability to navigate the necessary trade-offs among these values is also impaired. This course addresses these issues by pursuing a deeper understanding of these fundamental values. (HU)

Pre-Capstone Research Seminar

ENV 396 - Humston, Robert / Fisher, Chelsea R.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Strongly Encouraged for Seniors
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Strongly Encouraged for Seniors
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Strongly Encouraged for Seniors
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Strongly Encouraged for Seniors

In this seminar, students develop a proposal for the research that they will conduct in the subsequent Winter-term class, ENV 397. Both quantitative and qualitative research projects are encouraged and all research projects must have an interdisciplinary component. Students develop their research questions, prepare progress reports, annotated bibliographies, discussions of data, methods, and the significance of their proposed research. The final product is a complete research proposal which serves as a blueprint for the capstone research project. Students are also responsible for reviewing the work of classmates.

Sustainability Accounting

ACCT 303 - Hess, Megan F.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Social Sciences
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences

This course examines best practices and key debates in sustainability accounting and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting. Sustainable business practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the needs of the future. Increasingly, accountants are playing an important role in measuring, reporting, and auditing corporate impacts on society and the environment so that corporations can be held accountable and more sustainable business practices can be implemented.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Simurda, Maryanne C., Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill), Humston, Robert, Toporikova, Natalia

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Required
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Prereq for BIOL 201: Prereq for many BIOL course options in Conservation Biology and prereq for several BIOL course options in Water Resources and Climate Change
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Statistics for Biology and Medicine

BIOL 201 - Toporikova, Natalia

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Statistics - all tracks except ENV Econ
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

This course examines the principles of statistics and experimental design for biological and medical research. The focus is on the practical and conceptual aspects of statistics, rather than mathematical derivations. Students completing this class will be able to read and understand research papers, to design realistic experiments, and to carry out their own statistical analyses using computer packages.

Animal Behavior

BIOL 243 - Marsh, David M.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: N/A
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Conservation Biology (3 add'l)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior, including exploration of the evolutionary basis of behavior and examination of how animals choose mates, defend territories, find food, and avoid predators. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments with a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, birds, and humans. Laboratory course.

Ecology

BIOL 245 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Systems or Electives: Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Conservation Biology (Adv. Ecol. Fnd.)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Natural Sciences

An introduction to the study of interactions between organisms and their environments. Topics are arranged hierarchically: a) evolution and elementary population genetics; b) population dynamics and regulation; c) interspecific competition, predation, parasitism and symbiosis; d) community structure, energy and material flux in ecosystems. Laboratory is field oriented and investigative. Laboratory course.

Business Ethics

BUS 345 - Reiter, Sandra L. (Sandy)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: N/A
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics (Ethics)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

An examination of the moral and ethical issues associated with management policy and executive decisions. The course examines the basic approaches to moral reasoning, macro-moral issues concerning the justice of economic systems, and micro-moral issues, such as the following: conflict of interest, whistle blowing, discrimination in employment, product safety, environment, and advertising.

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Casey, James F. (Jim), Handy, Christopher M. (Chris), Yewell, Katherine G. (Katie), Kaiser, Carl P., Grajzl, Peter

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics (required)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Zhang, Tianbo (Alice)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics (required)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Advanced Quantitative Skills
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics (required) Advanced Quantitive Skills all other tracks
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Development Economics

ECON 280 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: N/A
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics (3 add'l)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.

Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology with Field Emphasis

GEOL 100 - Connors, Christopher D. (Chris), Knapp, Elizabeth P., Rahl, Jeffrey M.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Geology Fundamentals
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Prereq for many GEOL course options in Water Resources and Climate Change
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

No credit for students who have completed GEOL 101 or 102.    Involves moderate hiking and other physical activities outside in all types of weather. Additional fee required. The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment. Laboratory course with lab fee.  Fall 2020, GEOL 100A-01: FS: Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology with Field Emphasis (4). For Fall 2020, please note that field activities for this section only will focus on sites within walking distance of campus.  (SL) Rahl.

Sustainable Earth: Introductory Environmental Geology

GEOL 102 - Greer, Mary L. (Lisa)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Geology Fundamentals
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Serves as prereq for upper level GEOL courses just like GEOL 100 and 101
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Additional fee required. The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on environmental science and sustainability. Depending on the instructor, various topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; climate change; the nature of the Earth's interior; the origin of landforms; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; energy resources; the concept of deep time; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment. Laboratory course.

Geomorphology

GEOL 247 - Lyon, Eva C.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Water Resources (Science)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Investigation of landforms from maps, aerial photographs, digital data, and the analysis of the surficial processes by which they are formed. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of landscape form and process, and a required weekend field trip. Laboratory course.

Applied Statistics

INTR 202 - Churchill, Brandyn F., Lee, Inyeop

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Statistics - all tracks except Env. Econ.
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or ECON 202. An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.  

Seminar in Environmental Ethics

PHIL 365 - Cooper, Gregory J. (Greg)

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities/Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Humanities (Phil/Eth) Environmental Economics (Ethics) Water Resources (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

This course examines selected topics in environmental ethics. Topics may vary from year to year, and include the proper meanings and goals of environmentalism; the goals and methods of conservation biology; major environmental issues in current political debates; and balancing the ethical concerns of environmental justice and our responsibilities to future generations. This course may be taken only one for degree credit.Fall 2020, PHIL 365-01: Seminar in Environmental Ethics: Exploration of Fundamental Values (3).  We tend to justify our environmental decisions in terms of a narrow set of fundamental values. These values include humanistic values such as sustainability, environmental justice and economic growth and more ecologically oriented values such as biodiversity, ecosystem resilience, and ecological integrity. Unfortunately, these values are often understood at a very superficial level that undermines the justifications that appeal to them. Our ability to navigate the necessary trade-offs among these values is also impaired. This course addresses these issues by pursuing a deeper understanding of these fundamental values. (HU)

American National Government

POL 100 - Harris, Rebecca C.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Social Science: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Rush, Mark E., LeBlanc, Robin M., Lee, Inyeop

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Social Science: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to American Indian Religions

REL 285 - Markowitz, Harvey J.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities / Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Humanties
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Humanities (Rel/Soc/Anthropology or 2 add'l) Water Resources (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

This class introduces students to some of the dominant themes, values, beliefs, and practices found among the religions of North America's Indian peoples. The first part of the course explores the importance of sacred power, landscape, and community in traditional Indian spiritualities and rituals. It then examines some of the changes that have occurred in these traditions as a result of western expansion and dominance from the 18th through early 20th centuries. Lastly, the course considers some of the issues and problems confronting contemporary American Indian religions.

Introduction to American Indian Religions

SOAN 285 - Markowitz, Harvey J.

  • OLD Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities / Free Elective
  • OLD Minor Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Humanities (Rel/Soc/Anthropology or 2 add'l) Water Resources (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

This class introduces students to some of the dominant themes, values, beliefs, and practices found among the religions of North America's Indian peoples. The first part of the course explores the importance of sacred power, landscape, and community in traditional Indian spiritualities and rituals. It then examines some of the changes that have occurred in these traditions as a result of western expansion and dominance from the 18th through early 20th centuries. Lastly, the course considers some of the issues and problems confronting contemporary American Indian religions.