Degree Requirements

2022 - 2023 Catalog

We have the following degrees:

Earth and Environmental Geoscience major leading to BA degree

A major in Earth and Environmental Geoscience leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree is recommended for students interested in careers outside of science, including business, law, or policy, and requires 36 credits as follows:

  1. One course chosen from GEOL 100, 101, or 102.
  2. In total, at least 21 credits in Earth and Environmental Geoscience at the 200 or 300 level. Of those, at least 3 credits at the 300 level are required.
  3. Additional credits chosen from Earth and Environmental Geoscience; Engineering; Mathematics; BIOL 105 or higher; CHEM 110; CHEM 165 or higher; CSCI 111 or higher; INTR 202; PHYS 111 or higher.
  4. All Geology courses above must be distributed as follows. (Courses may be used to meet more than one requirement in this category.)
    1. Field skills: at least one course chosen from GEOL 230, 231, 275
    2. Solid earth: at least one course chosen from GEOL 211, 250, 275, 360
    3. Hydrosphere/biosphere/atmosphere: at least one course chosen from GEOL 141, 205, 311
    4. Surface processes: at least one course chosen from GEOL 240, 247, 330
    5. At least two lab courses chosen from GEOL 211, 240, 247, 250, 311, 330, 335
  1. One course chosen from:
  2.  

    • GEOL 100 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology with Field Emphasis
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      Prerequisitefirst-year or sophomore class standing

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


    • GEOL 101 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


    • GEOL 102 - Sustainable Earth: Introductory Environmental Geology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on environmental science and sustainability. There is special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Depending on the instructor, various topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; climate change; the nature of the Earth's interior; the origin of landforms; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; energy resources; the concept of deep time; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


  3. In total, at least 21 credits in Earth and Environmental Geoscience at the 200 or 300 level. Of those, at least 3 credits from Geology at the 300 level are required.
  4. Additional courses chosen from:
    • Geology
    • Engineering
    • Mathematics
    • BIOL 105 or higher
    • CHEM 110; CHEM 165 or higher
    • CSCI 111 or higher
    • INTR 202
    • PHYS 111 or higher
  5. All Earth and Environmental Geoscience courses above must be distributed as follows:
  6. (Courses may be used to meet more than one requirement in this category.)

    • Field skills:

      at least one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 230 - Field Methods in the Appalachians
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102; and Geology major

        An introduction to the study of geology in the field with special attention to the methods used by geologists to make, record, and interpret field observations. The course includes study of and field trips in the central Appalachian region.


      • GEOL 231 - Environmental Field Methods
        Credits4
        Prerequisiteinstructor consent

        An introduction to the study of standard methods, equipment and tools used in environmental field investigations. Special attention is given to methods used by geologists to measure, record, and report field observations associated with groundwater, surface water, soil and air. Focus is given to the validity of data obtained using various investigative strategies as well as data handling and presentation. The course has an intensive field component using the local watershed as a model environmental system.


      • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys.


    • Solid earth:

      at least one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 211 - Earth Materials
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course introducing Earth materials, including minerals and rocks, with an emphasis on a hands-on approach to identifying and interpreting minerals and their associations in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students learn the techniques and principles of hand sample identification, optical mineralogy and petrography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.


      • GEOL 250 - Structural Geology and Tectonics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101; and GEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Description and methods of analysis of large- and small-scale structural features of the Earth's crust. Topics also include the analysis of geometry, strain and stress as they relate to deformation in the earth. Rock mechanics, application of structural geology in environmental engineering and resource exploration, geometric and computational techniques used in structural analysis, interpretation of geologic maps, and the structural development of mountain systems are also covered.


      • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys.


      • GEOL 360 - Tectonics and Thermochronology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        An introduction to mountain belts and thermochronologic techniques used to quantify tectonic processes. Topics include: orogenic wedges, metamorphic core complexes, rifting, strike-slip systems, orogenic plateaus, the relationship between tectonics and climate, and the use of bedrock and detrital thermochronology to measure rates of faulting, erosion, and exhumation. Concepts are discussed in the context of natural examples, including the Appalachians, the European Alps, the Himalaya, the Andes, and the Basin and Range Province of the southwestern United States.


    • Hydrosphere/biosphere/atmosphere:

      at least one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 141 - Global Climate Change
        FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
        Credits3

        A study of Earth's complex climate system and the impact of human activities on future climates. Through readings, discussions, data analyses and modeling exercises, the past and future changes in temperature, ocean circulation, rainfall, storminess, biogeochemistry, glacial ice extent and sea level are explored.


      • GEOL 205 - History and Evolution of the Earth
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        An introductory examination of the origin and physical evolution of the Earth as inferred from the rock record. Areas of particular emphasis include: (1) the origin of the solar system and differentiation of the planets; (2) the evolution of the terrestrial atmosphere and hydrosphere; (3) explanations for the development of life; (4) organic evolution and interpretations of mass extinctions; (5) the changing configuration of continental blocks and ocean basins by continental drift, seafloor spreading, and plate tectonics; and (6) the growth of continental blocks and their mountain systems.


      • GEOL 311 - Earth and Environmental Geochemistry
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course emphasizing the principles and tools of the chemical composition of Earth materials to interpret petrogenesis. The course focuses on processes occurring below and at the Earth's surface. Topics include: crystal chemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, trace element and isotope geochemistry, oxidation and reduction, and water-rock interactions. The laboratory includes both a local field and laboratory component and focuses on using analytical techniques to evaluate chemical composition including electron microscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.


    • Surface processes:

      at least one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 240 - Hydrology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Systems and processes of water movement on and below the Earth's surface. Encompasses the theoretical and applied aspects of soil moisture, runoff, flooding, groundwater movement, and water-well use. Numerical evaluation of flow properties from field and lab data describing water movement in soils, aquifers, and streams.


      • GEOL 247 - Geomorphology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Investigation of earth-surface landforms and processes from maps, aerial photographs, and digital data. Includes numerical analysis and modeling of surface process systems and the deep history of our palimpsest Appalachian landscape. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of soil, unconsolidated materials, landform shapes, and erosional processes.


      • GEOL 330 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Properties, origins, and dynamics of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Correlation, organization, and historical interpretation of the sedimentary rock record. Field and laboratory analyses of sedimentary rocks.


    • At least two lab courses chosen from:
      • GEOL 211 - Earth Materials
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course introducing Earth materials, including minerals and rocks, with an emphasis on a hands-on approach to identifying and interpreting minerals and their associations in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students learn the techniques and principles of hand sample identification, optical mineralogy and petrography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.


      • GEOL 240 - Hydrology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Systems and processes of water movement on and below the Earth's surface. Encompasses the theoretical and applied aspects of soil moisture, runoff, flooding, groundwater movement, and water-well use. Numerical evaluation of flow properties from field and lab data describing water movement in soils, aquifers, and streams.


      • GEOL 247 - Geomorphology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Investigation of earth-surface landforms and processes from maps, aerial photographs, and digital data. Includes numerical analysis and modeling of surface process systems and the deep history of our palimpsest Appalachian landscape. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of soil, unconsolidated materials, landform shapes, and erosional processes.


      • GEOL 250 - Structural Geology and Tectonics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101; and GEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Description and methods of analysis of large- and small-scale structural features of the Earth's crust. Topics also include the analysis of geometry, strain and stress as they relate to deformation in the earth. Rock mechanics, application of structural geology in environmental engineering and resource exploration, geometric and computational techniques used in structural analysis, interpretation of geologic maps, and the structural development of mountain systems are also covered.


      • GEOL 311 - Earth and Environmental Geochemistry
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course emphasizing the principles and tools of the chemical composition of Earth materials to interpret petrogenesis. The course focuses on processes occurring below and at the Earth's surface. Topics include: crystal chemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, trace element and isotope geochemistry, oxidation and reduction, and water-rock interactions. The laboratory includes both a local field and laboratory component and focuses on using analytical techniques to evaluate chemical composition including electron microscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.


      • GEOL 330 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Properties, origins, and dynamics of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Correlation, organization, and historical interpretation of the sedimentary rock record. Field and laboratory analyses of sedimentary rocks.


      • GEOL 335 - Petroleum Geology and Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102; and Geology major

        A survey of the theory and practice of petroleum geology and geophysics. Topics covered include the nature and origin of petroleum, a study of where oil and gas accumulate from the perspective of basin analysis, and the basic principles of reflection seismology and petrophysics. The key petroleum system elements of source, charge, seal, reservoir and trap are studied within the context of how a geologist or geophysicist goes about exploring for and developing petroleum accumulations. Emphasis is placed on the Geology use of industry software and data to analyze geologic features, deposits, and basins that are relevant to petroleum exploration and production.


Earth and Environmental Geoscience major leading to BS degree

A major in Earth and Environmental Geoscience leading to a Bachelor of Science degree is recommended for students pursuing graduate school or employment in geology and consists of at least 53 credits as follows.

  1. One course chosen from GEOL 100, 101, or 102
  2. CHEM 110, MATH 101, PHYS 111
  3. At least 8 additional credits chosen from BIOL 111/113; BIOL 210 or higher; CHEM 165; CHEM 211 or higher; PHYS 112; PHYS 202 or higher
  4. One course chosen from CSCI 121, GEOL 260, INTR 202, or MATH 102 or higher
  5. At least 24 credits in Earth and Environmental Geoscience at the 200 or 300 level and at least 7 credits at the 300 level, distributed as follows. (Courses may be used to meet more than one requirement in this category.)
    1. Field skills: one course chosen from GEOL 230, 231, 275
    2. Solid earth: one course chosen from GEOL 211, 250, 275, 360
    3. Hydrosphere/biosphere/atmosphere: one course chosen from GEOL 141, 205, 311
    4. Surface processes: one course chosen from GEOL 240, 247, 330
    5. Two lab courses chosen from GEOL 211, 240, 247, 250
    6. One lab course chosen from GEOL 311, 330, 335
  6. Additional credits chosen from Earth and Environmental Geoscience; Engineering; Mathematics; BIOL 111/113; BIOL 140: BIOL 210 or higher; CHEM 106; CHEM 156; CHEM 165 or higher; CSCI 112 or higher; PHYS 150 or higher
  7. A comprehensive examination in Earth and Environmental Geoscience.
  1. One course chosen from:
  2.  

    • GEOL 100 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology with Field Emphasis
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      Prerequisitefirst-year or sophomore class standing

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


    • GEOL 101 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


    • GEOL 102 - Sustainable Earth: Introductory Environmental Geology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on environmental science and sustainability. There is special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Depending on the instructor, various topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; climate change; the nature of the Earth's interior; the origin of landforms; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; energy resources; the concept of deep time; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


  3. Additional required courses:
  4.  

    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Sections meet either 3 or 4 days a week, with material in the latter presented at a more casual pace.


    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


  5. At least 8 additional credits chosen from:
  6.  

    • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits3

      An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism.


    • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits1

      A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


    • BIOL 210 - Human Parasitology

      or higher

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and BIOL 113

      A survey of the phenomenon of animal parasitism, including discussion of the chief distinguishing structures, life cycles, and functions of major pathogenic parasites infecting humans and other animals.


    • CHEM 211 - Analytical Chemistry

      or higher

      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCHEM 110 and at least sophomore class standing

      Emphasis on inorganic systems exhibiting aqueous solution equilibria. Topics covered include acid/base reactions, redox reactions, complexation, precipitation reactions, and solution equilibrium. Laboratory work emphasizes basic wet-chemical as well as more sophisticated instrumental techniques of chemical quantitative analysis with appropriate statistical methods of data handling.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


    • PHYS 202 - Relativity

      or higher

      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112

      An examination of the special theory of relativity. Emphasis is placed on kinematic effects of the theory, conservation of momentum, conservation of energy, and electromagnetic implications of the theory. A brief introduction to general relativity is entertained.


  7. One course chosen from:
  8.  

    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits4

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • GEOL 260 - GIS and Remote Sensing
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGeology major or Environmental Studies major or minor; and GEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

      A laboratory course introducing the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing in geological/environmental analyses and decision making. Students use state-of-the-art software with a wide variety of spatial geologic, environmental, economic and topographic data derived from satellites; remote databases and published maps to evaluate geologic conditions; local landscape processes; environmental conditions; and hypothetical land-use cases.


    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics
      Credits3

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II

      or higher

      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 101 with a grade of C or greater

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


  9. At least 24 credits in Earth and Environmental Geoscience at the 200 or 300 level and at least 7 credits at the 300 level, distributed as follows.
  10. (Courses may be used to meet more than one requirement in this category.)

    • Field skills:

       one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 230 - Field Methods in the Appalachians
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102; and Geology major

        An introduction to the study of geology in the field with special attention to the methods used by geologists to make, record, and interpret field observations. The course includes study of and field trips in the central Appalachian region.


      • GEOL 231 - Environmental Field Methods
        Credits4
        Prerequisiteinstructor consent

        An introduction to the study of standard methods, equipment and tools used in environmental field investigations. Special attention is given to methods used by geologists to measure, record, and report field observations associated with groundwater, surface water, soil and air. Focus is given to the validity of data obtained using various investigative strategies as well as data handling and presentation. The course has an intensive field component using the local watershed as a model environmental system.


      • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys.


    • Solid earth:

      one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 211 - Earth Materials
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course introducing Earth materials, including minerals and rocks, with an emphasis on a hands-on approach to identifying and interpreting minerals and their associations in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students learn the techniques and principles of hand sample identification, optical mineralogy and petrography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.


      • GEOL 250 - Structural Geology and Tectonics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101; and GEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Description and methods of analysis of large- and small-scale structural features of the Earth's crust. Topics also include the analysis of geometry, strain and stress as they relate to deformation in the earth. Rock mechanics, application of structural geology in environmental engineering and resource exploration, geometric and computational techniques used in structural analysis, interpretation of geologic maps, and the structural development of mountain systems are also covered.


      • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys.


      • GEOL 360 - Tectonics and Thermochronology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        An introduction to mountain belts and thermochronologic techniques used to quantify tectonic processes. Topics include: orogenic wedges, metamorphic core complexes, rifting, strike-slip systems, orogenic plateaus, the relationship between tectonics and climate, and the use of bedrock and detrital thermochronology to measure rates of faulting, erosion, and exhumation. Concepts are discussed in the context of natural examples, including the Appalachians, the European Alps, the Himalaya, the Andes, and the Basin and Range Province of the southwestern United States.


    • Hydrosphere/biosphere/atmosphere:

      one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 141 - Global Climate Change
        FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
        Credits3

        A study of Earth's complex climate system and the impact of human activities on future climates. Through readings, discussions, data analyses and modeling exercises, the past and future changes in temperature, ocean circulation, rainfall, storminess, biogeochemistry, glacial ice extent and sea level are explored.


      • GEOL 205 - History and Evolution of the Earth
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        An introductory examination of the origin and physical evolution of the Earth as inferred from the rock record. Areas of particular emphasis include: (1) the origin of the solar system and differentiation of the planets; (2) the evolution of the terrestrial atmosphere and hydrosphere; (3) explanations for the development of life; (4) organic evolution and interpretations of mass extinctions; (5) the changing configuration of continental blocks and ocean basins by continental drift, seafloor spreading, and plate tectonics; and (6) the growth of continental blocks and their mountain systems.


      • GEOL 311 - Earth and Environmental Geochemistry
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course emphasizing the principles and tools of the chemical composition of Earth materials to interpret petrogenesis. The course focuses on processes occurring below and at the Earth's surface. Topics include: crystal chemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, trace element and isotope geochemistry, oxidation and reduction, and water-rock interactions. The laboratory includes both a local field and laboratory component and focuses on using analytical techniques to evaluate chemical composition including electron microscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.


    • Surface processes:

      one course chosen from:

      • GEOL 240 - Hydrology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Systems and processes of water movement on and below the Earth's surface. Encompasses the theoretical and applied aspects of soil moisture, runoff, flooding, groundwater movement, and water-well use. Numerical evaluation of flow properties from field and lab data describing water movement in soils, aquifers, and streams.


      • GEOL 247 - Geomorphology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Investigation of earth-surface landforms and processes from maps, aerial photographs, and digital data. Includes numerical analysis and modeling of surface process systems and the deep history of our palimpsest Appalachian landscape. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of soil, unconsolidated materials, landform shapes, and erosional processes.


      • GEOL 330 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Properties, origins, and dynamics of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Correlation, organization, and historical interpretation of the sedimentary rock record. Field and laboratory analyses of sedimentary rocks.


    • Two lab courses chosen from:

       

      • GEOL 211 - Earth Materials
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course introducing Earth materials, including minerals and rocks, with an emphasis on a hands-on approach to identifying and interpreting minerals and their associations in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students learn the techniques and principles of hand sample identification, optical mineralogy and petrography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.


      • GEOL 240 - Hydrology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Systems and processes of water movement on and below the Earth's surface. Encompasses the theoretical and applied aspects of soil moisture, runoff, flooding, groundwater movement, and water-well use. Numerical evaluation of flow properties from field and lab data describing water movement in soils, aquifers, and streams.


      • GEOL 247 - Geomorphology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Investigation of earth-surface landforms and processes from maps, aerial photographs, and digital data. Includes numerical analysis and modeling of surface process systems and the deep history of our palimpsest Appalachian landscape. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of soil, unconsolidated materials, landform shapes, and erosional processes.


      • GEOL 250 - Structural Geology and Tectonics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101; and GEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Description and methods of analysis of large- and small-scale structural features of the Earth's crust. Topics also include the analysis of geometry, strain and stress as they relate to deformation in the earth. Rock mechanics, application of structural geology in environmental engineering and resource exploration, geometric and computational techniques used in structural analysis, interpretation of geologic maps, and the structural development of mountain systems are also covered.


    • One lab course chosen from:

       

      • GEOL 311 - Earth and Environmental Geochemistry
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        A laboratory course emphasizing the principles and tools of the chemical composition of Earth materials to interpret petrogenesis. The course focuses on processes occurring below and at the Earth's surface. Topics include: crystal chemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, trace element and isotope geochemistry, oxidation and reduction, and water-rock interactions. The laboratory includes both a local field and laboratory component and focuses on using analytical techniques to evaluate chemical composition including electron microscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.


      • GEOL 330 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102

        Properties, origins, and dynamics of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Correlation, organization, and historical interpretation of the sedimentary rock record. Field and laboratory analyses of sedimentary rocks.


      • GEOL 335 - Petroleum Geology and Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101, or GEOL 102; and Geology major

        A survey of the theory and practice of petroleum geology and geophysics. Topics covered include the nature and origin of petroleum, a study of where oil and gas accumulate from the perspective of basin analysis, and the basic principles of reflection seismology and petrophysics. The key petroleum system elements of source, charge, seal, reservoir and trap are studied within the context of how a geologist or geophysicist goes about exploring for and developing petroleum accumulations. Emphasis is placed on the Geology use of industry software and data to analyze geologic features, deposits, and basins that are relevant to petroleum exploration and production.


  11. Additional credits chosen from:
    • Engineering

    • Geology

    • Mathematics

    • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits3

      An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism.


    • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits1

      A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


    • BIOL 210 - Human Parasitology

      or higher

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and BIOL 113

      A survey of the phenomenon of animal parasitism, including discussion of the chief distinguishing structures, life cycles, and functions of major pathogenic parasites infecting humans and other animals.


    • CHEM 106 - Disorder and Chaos
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns.


    • CHEM 156 - Science in Art
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteinstructor consent

      This course develops students' fundamental understanding of certain physical, chemical, biological, and geological concepts and utilizes that vocabulary and knowledge to discuss 17th-century Dutch art. The emphasis is on key aspects of optics, light, and chemical bonding needed to understand how a painting works and how art conservators analyze paintings in terms of conservation and authenticity, using techniques such as X-ray radiography, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, infrared microscopy, infrared reflectography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, UV photography, and laser ablation methods. When possible, the course develops modern notions of science with those of the 17th century in order to see how 17th-century science influenced 17th-century art.


    • CSCI 112 - Fundamentals of Programming II

      or higher

      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCSCI 111

      A continuation of CSCI 111. Emphasis is on the use and implementation of data structures, introductory algorithm analysis, and object-oriented design and programming with Python.


    • PHYS 150 - The Immense Journey: Harmonices Mundi

      or higher

      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      The classical astronomy of the solar system is traced by a study of Greek astronomy and the revolutionary ideas of Kepler and Newton. The apparent and real motions of the earth, moon, and planets are studied in detail, as well as special phenomena such as eclipses, tides, and objects such as comets and asteroids. Emphasis is on comprehension and application of principles rather than memorization of facts. The laboratory stresses the observational aspects of astronomy. Elementary geometry, algebra, and trigonometry are used in the course.


  12. A comprehensive examination in Earth and Environmental Geoscience.

Integrated Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in integrated engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 65 credits including the following. This major may not be combined with the major in engineering nor with a major in the respective department associated with the science track that a student selects for the IE major.

  1. PHYS 111, 112; MATH 101, 102, 221, 332; ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378, 379
  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from ENGN 301+351 or 311+361
  3. One course chosen from: ENGN 208, 240, 260, 267, 295, 301+351, 311+361, 312, 330, 395
  4. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • BIOL 111+113 and three BIOL courses 200 level or above
    • CHEM 110, 241, 242, and 261
    • CSCI 111, 112, and two CSCI courses 200 level or above
    • GEOL 100, 101, or 102 and three GEOL courses 200 level or above
  1. Required courses
  2.  

    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Sections meet either 3 or 4 days a week, with material in the latter presented at a more casual pace.


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 101 with a grade of C or greater

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 102 with a grade of C or greater, MATH 201, or MATH 222

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with a grade of C or greater

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits4

      This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.


    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, and momentum.


    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits

      (PHYS 207)

      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 207. A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits.


    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering

      (PHYS 225)

      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and MATH 221

      Same as PHYS 225. Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 378 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 178, ENGN 204, ENGN 207, and ENGN 225; and ENGN 301 or ENGN 311; and ENGN 208, ENGN 240, ENGN 260, ENGN 267, ENGN 295, ENGN 301, ENGN 311, ENGN 312, ENGN 330, or ENGN 395. All courses with a grade of C or greater

      First term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The fall term is dedicated to the design and planning phases. This includes project topic selection; comprehensive study of necessary background material; and identification of design objectives, conceptual models, and materials and equipment needed.


    • ENGN 379 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteENGN 378 with a grade of C or greater

      Second term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The winter term is dedicated to implementation -- building, testing, analyzing, and revising the design, culminating with a public presentation and proof-of-concept demonstration.


  3. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from:
  4. .

    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • or

    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      +

      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


  5. One course from:
    • ENGN 208 - Electronics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 207 or PHYS 207 with a grade of C or greater in either

      Same as PHYS 208. An introduction to digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of electronics systems. The first half of the course focuses on foundational concepts including: transistor/semiconductor technology, digital logic gates, RAM and Flash memory, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog converters, digital communication protocols (SPI and I2C), wireless devices, and microcontroller operation. The second half of the course is project-based: student teams develop an electronics system that solves a real world problem.


    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and PHYS 112 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 240. A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.


    • ENGN 260 - Materials Science and Engineering
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 with a grade of C or greater

      Same as PHYS 260. An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112

      Same as BIOL 267. Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


    • ENGN 295 - Intermediate Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3-4

      Intermediate work in bioengineering, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics or materials science.


    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 203 with a grade of C or greater

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • with

    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis.


    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGN 225 and MATH 332; and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230. All with a grade of C or greater

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • with

    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy.


    • ENGN 312 - Heat Transfer
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332; and ENGN 311 with a grade of C or greater

      Principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include transient and steady state analysis, boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger analysis. Application of these principles to selected problems in engineering.


    • ENGN 330 - Mechanical Vibrations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and either ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 with a grade of C or greater

      Analysis of lumped parameter and continuous systems (free and forced, damped and undamped, single- and multi-degree-of-freedom); transient response to shock pulses; simple linear systems; exact and approximate solution techniques; and solution to continuous systems using partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 395 - Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3

      Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science, or additional upper-level engineering topics. Topics selected based on student interest.


  6. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • Biology
      • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits3

        An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism.


      • with

      • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits1

        A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


      • and

        three BIOL courses 200 level or above

    • Chemistry
      • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits4

        This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory.


      • CHEM 241 - Organic Chemistry I
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110 with a grade of C+ or greater

        A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods.


      • CHEM 242 - Organic Chemistry II
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCHEM 241

        A continuation of CHEM 241.


      • CHEM 261 - Physical Chemistry: Quantum & Computational Chemistry
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110, MATH 102, and at least junior class standing

        An introduction to quantum mechanics as it applies to atomic and molecular systems. The emphasis is placed on spectroscopic methods and the modern picture of chemical bonding and molecular structure and computational methods.


    • Computer Science
      • CSCI 111 - Fundamentals of Programming I
        FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
        Credits4

        A disciplined approach to programming with Python. Emphasis is on problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and object-oriented concepts. Lectures and formal laboratories.


      • CSCI 112 - Fundamentals of Programming II
        FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCSCI 111

        A continuation of CSCI 111. Emphasis is on the use and implementation of data structures, introductory algorithm analysis, and object-oriented design and programming with Python.


      • and

        two CSCI courses 200 level or above

    • Earth and Environmental Geoscience
      • GEOL 100 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology with Field Emphasis
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits4
        Prerequisitefirst-year or sophomore class standing

        The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


      • or

      • GEOL 101 - Dynamic Earth: Introductory Geology
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits4

        The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet. Topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; the origin of landforms; and the concept of deep time. Additional topics, with emphasis varying by instructor, include: climate change; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; energy resources; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


      • or

      • GEOL 102 - Sustainable Earth: Introductory Environmental Geology
        FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
        Credits4

        The study of Earth systems, our physical environment, and the processes shaping our planet with special emphasis on environmental science and sustainability. There is special emphasis on field study of the region near Lexington. Depending on the instructor, various topics include: plate tectonics; the materials and structure of the Earth's crust; climate change; the nature of the Earth's interior; the origin of landforms; weathering and erosion; water quality and movement; natural hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes; energy resources; the concept of deep time; geospatial and quantitative data analysis; and the relationship between humans and the environment.


      • and

        three GEOL courses 200 level or above

Mathematics major leading to BS degree

A major in mathematics leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of at least 51 credits as follows:

  1. MATH 201, 221, 222, 311, 321, 343
  2. One course chosen from MATH 391, 392, and 393
  3. PHYS 111 and 112
  4. CSCI 111 or 121
  5. 12 additional credits selected from mathematics courses numbered above 300
  6. Six additional credits selected from courses in biology, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental geoscience, engineering, mathematics (numbered 200 and above), and physics, except courses excluded from degree programs in those subjects.

Additional courses required as prerequisites for completion of the above include MATH 101 and 102 or their equivalents.

  1. Required courses:
  2.  

    • MATH 201 - Bridges to Advanced Mathematics
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      Prerequisite6 credits of MATH courses, MATH 221, or MATH 222

      The course explores various important mathematical constructions and ideas, with a particular emphasis on mathematical inquiry and reasoning. Topics include: sets, functions, equivalence relations, modular arithmetic, and basic properties of the integers, real numbers, and complex numbers.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 102 with a grade of C or greater, MATH 201, or MATH 222

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 222 - Linear Algebra
      FDRSC Science, Math, CS Distribution
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 102 with a grade of C or greater, MATH 201, or MATH 221

      Linear algebra is the backbone of much of mathematics. Students in this course learn to identify and explain the basic principles, terminology, and theories used in linear algebra, and apply quantitative and/or qualitative reasoning skills to solve problems posed in linear algebra, primarily through applications of to both mathematics and the sciences, and also by writing proofs In mathematics.


    • MATH 311 - Real Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and either MATH 201 or MATH 301

      A systematic study of concepts basic to calculus, such as topology of the real numbers, limits, differentiation, integration, sequences and series. Additional topics vary by instructor.


    • MATH 321 - Abstract Algebra
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 222 and either MATH 201 or MATH 301

      An introduction to basic algebraic structures common throughout mathematics. These include rings, fields, groups, homomorphisms and quotient structures. Additional topics vary by instructor.


    • MATH 343 - Geometry
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221, MATH 222, and either MATH 201 or MATH 301

      This course is an introduction to geometric techniques through study of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries and their transformations. Additional topics vary by instructor.


  3. One course chosen from:
    • MATH 391 - Topics in Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 311

      Topics vary but can include complex analysis, topology, differential equations, differential topology, numerical analysis, functional analysis, measure theory, fractal geometry, Lebesgue integration and Fourier analysis, harmonic analysis, and analytic number theory.


    • MATH 392 - Topics in Abstract Algebra
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 321

      Topics vary but can include field and Galois theory, geometric and combinatorial group theory, representation theory, number theory, algebraic number theory, commutative algebra, algebraic geometry, arithmetic geometry, advanced linear algebra, algebraic coding theory and cryptography, algebraic topology, homological algebra, and graph theory.


    • MATH 393 - Topics in Geometry and Topology
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 342 or MATH 343

      Topics vary but can include knot theory, topology and geometry of surfaces, differential geometry, Riemann surfaces, 3-manifolds, tilings, geometric probability, geometry of spacetime, finite geometry, computational geometry, differential topology, and projective geometry.


  4. Take:
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4

      An introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, solids, fluids, and wave motion.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL Lab Science Distribution
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS 111

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and optics.


  5. Take one of the following courses:
    • CSCI 111 - Fundamentals of Programming I
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits4

      A disciplined approach to programming with Python. Emphasis is on problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and object-oriented concepts. Lectures and formal laboratories.


    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM Math and Computer Science Foundation
      Credits4

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


  6. 12 additional credits selected from mathematics courses numbered above 300
  7. Six additional credits selected from courses in
  8. biology, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental geoscience, engineering, mathematics (numbered 200 and above), and physics, except courses excluded from degree programs in those subjects.