Course Offerings

Winter 2023

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Digital Culture and Information

DCI 101 - Abdoney, Mary

What does it mean to be a citizen of a digital world? How do you think critically about the ways that technology shapes our society? How do you learn new digital skills when platforms are constantly changing? How do you find and use information effectively without being overwhelmed or mislead? Through hands-on activities and project-based learning, this course serves as an introduction to the study of digital culture and information. Students will develop the critical capacity and technological fluency necessary to understand, analyze, critique, and create in a world dominated by digital media, software algorithms, and information overload.

Topics in Digital Culture and Information: Geospatial Analytics

DCI 295A - Tombarge, John W.

Engaged citizenship in a global and diverse society requires individuals to understand the social and economic situations wherein people live. This class will provide students with the tools to do just that by introducing methods of geospatial analysis for research and strategic communications. Maps offer an effective way to convey information, and, with geospatial analysis in their research toolset, students will be able to create maps that allow their readers to visualize the relevant data. In this class, students will form research questions, find appropriate data, and apply geospatial analytic tools to study social issues and reach informed conclusions. Students need no specific technical experience as the class will introduce a suite of Geographic Information Systems software and geospatial tools.

Topics in Digital Culture and Information: Digital Bookish Culture

DCI 295B - Kiser, Paula S.

Students in this course will explore the impact of digital culture on reading, peoples’ relationships with books, and the presentation of book culture on digital platforms and social media. The course will address issues such as analog and digital reading formats, community building around books, and the role of various demographics in bookish culture. Through weekly readings, discussions, and writing assignments, students will develop and/or improve their analytical skills to explore the information literacy concepts of contextual authority, scholarship as conversation, and information creation as a process. Students will create a book themed, interview-based podcast episode as part of their final project and will create a physical commonplace book throughout the term.

Creating Digital Scholarship Seminar

DCI 393 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

This seminar provides students with the skills, theoretical background, and methodological support to transform a work of traditional scholarship within an academic discipline into a public-facing work of digital scholarship. Students decide on a digital project in consultation with classmates and the instructor. Students survey and analyze examples of digital scholarship to determine what form each student's project should take.

Fall 2022

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Digital Culture and Information

DCI 101 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

What does it mean to be a citizen of a digital world? How do you think critically about the ways that technology shapes our society? How do you learn new digital skills when platforms are constantly changing? How do you find and use information effectively without being overwhelmed or mislead? Through hands-on activities and project-based learning, this course serves as an introduction to the study of digital culture and information. Students will develop the critical capacity and technological fluency necessary to understand, analyze, critique, and create in a world dominated by digital media, software algorithms, and information overload.

Web Programming for Non-Programmers

DCI 110 - Barry, Jeffrey S.

Computer science and IT graduates are no longer the only people expected to have some knowledge of how to program. Humanities and social science majors can greatly increase their job prospects by understanding the fundamentals of writing computer code, not only through the ability itself but also being better able to communicate with programming professionals and comprehending the software development and design process as a whole. The most centralized and simple platform for learning is the Web. This course starts with a brief introduction to/review of HTML and CSS and then focuses on using JavaScript to write basic code and implement preexisting libraries to analyze and visualize data. Students become familiar with building a complete Web page that showcases all three languages.

FS: First Year Seminar: Every Map Tells a Story

DCI 180A - Tombarge, John W.

Place-based technologies permeate our lives, from the location services on our smartphones to the spatial-decision support systems that guide applications in areas such as disaster management, health care and public health, digital humanities, resource and water management, urban and regional planning, sustainability, and business analytics. This class will investigate the power of maps and spatial data to document and illustrate local and global issues. Learn how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to explore the world around you and share ideas. Apply GIS principles and tools to create your own maps and tell your own stories.

Spring 2022

We do not offer any courses this term.