Course Offerings

Fall 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Data in the Humanities

DCI 102 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

This course introduces students to the creation and visualization of data in humanities research. The course is predicated on the fact that the digital turn of the last several decades has drastically changed the nature of knowledge production and distribution. The community and set of practices that is digital humanities (DH) encourages fluency in media beyond the printed word such as text mining, digital curation, data visualization, and spatial analysis. Readings and discussions of theory complement hands-on application of digital methods and computational thinking. While the objects of our study come primarily from the humanities, the methods of analysis are widely applicable to the social and natural sciences. Three unit-long collaborative projects explore the creation, structure, and visualization of humanities data. This course meets in two-hour blocks to accommodate a lab component.

Communication Through the Web

DCI 108 - Mickel, Jason T.

Although the World Wide Web is nearly 30 years old, the medium is in its relative infancy. and we are still learning how to use it to communicate effectively. This course takes a liberal arts approach to Web design and development by clearly defining the message that is being sent; determining the audience to whom the message should reach; shaping the message for the medium; designing a website with suitable coherent structure, text, and multimedia content; planning to allow access to the site for those other than fully capable visitors; use of HTML and CSS; and soliciting feedback for making changes and improvements.

FS: First-Year Seminar

DCI 180 - Tombarge, John W.

A seminar for first-year students. Applicability to FDRs and other requirements varies.

Fall 2021, DCI 180-01: FS: First-Year Seminar: Every Map Tells a Story (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Place-based technologies permeate our lives, from the location services on our smartphones to the spatial-decision support systems that guide applications in areas such as disaster management, health care and public health, digital humanities, resource and water management, urban and regional planning, sustainability, and business analytics. This class will investigate the power of maps and spatial data to document and illustrate local and global issues. Learn how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to explore the world around you and share ideas. Apply GIS principles and tools to create your own maps and tell your own stories. Tombarge.

Conventions of Scholarship: Past, Present, and Future

DCI 191 - Abdoney, Mary

What is scholarship? Who controls it? Who is left out of scholarly conversations? In the first six weeks of this course, students will explore how various information stakeholders define scholarship, from academics to government bodies. We will primarily explore how academic inquiry differs from personal inquiry; what conventions people observe within the social sciences, humanities, fine arts, and STEM; and the problem of gatekeeping in academic scholarship, and how certain populations are marginalized. Students will learn how to identify quality scholarship, while remembering that quality is subjective and fluid. The second half of the course will leave behind the classroom in favor of an experiential learning lab in the University Library. Students will help their peers not only find information and scholarship to satisfy their own academic inquiry, but will also learn how libraries organize that material and make it discoverable. 

Digital Collections and Exhibits

DCI 201 - Kiser, Paula S.

Students explore W&L's history through primary sources in Special Collections and Archives to develop a public-facing online collection of materials and a narrative exhibit. This course teaches students how to plan and implemeAnt a digital collection and exhibit from the initial concept through the final project.

Spring 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Innovations in Publishing

DCI 175 - Barry, Jeffrey S.

An intensive introduction to the publishing industry with a focus on digital innovations. A hands-on approach in a series of four laboratory sessions provides students with the ability to tackle a variety of technical scenarios for publishing. Each class begins with news from the publishing industry and ends by examining job ads to understand the types of skills and experiences necessary for pursuing careers in this very broad field. This course focuses primarily on the publishing of video games. 

21st-Century Show and Tell: Multimedia Design for Instruction

DCI 270 - Mickel, Jason T.

E-learning provides a method to convey instruction for concepts and skills that require minimal to moderate explanation and nuance. It can serve as a primer for information that a wide audience needs to know prior to diving deeper into a topic or as a refresher for knowledge that can be accessed anytime and anywhere an Internet connection is available. Students learn core instructional-design theories and to use instructional technology to develop a learning module in the context of an academic library. They design the course from scratch following industry-standard principles using tools that aid in wire-framing, scriptwriting, asset collection, and module construction.

Winter 2021

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Communication Through the Web

DCI 108 - Mickel, Jason T.

Although the World Wide Web is nearly 30 years old, the medium is in its relative infancy. and we are still learning how to use it to communicate effectively. This course takes a liberal arts approach to Web design and development by clearly defining the message that is being sent; determining the audience to whom the message should reach; shaping the message for the medium; designing a website with suitable coherent structure, text, and multimedia content; planning to allow access to the site for those other than fully capable visitors; use of HTML and CSS; and soliciting feedback for making changes and improvements.

Digital Culture and Information Studio

DCI 190 - Mickel, Jason T.

This course examines the research questions that guide digital humanities methodology, reviews exemplary scholarly projects on the topic at hand, and offers significant hands-on experience exploring relevant tools. May be repeated for up to three degree credits if the topics are different.

Introduction to Data Science

DCI 202 - Khalifa, Moataz

Not open to students with credit for ECON 202 or INTR 202. Foundation in introductory statistics and data science which enables students to understand and participate in introductory data-science projects. The course starts with an introduction to the concepts of data science and its use in today's society. Students are exposed to a survey of the basics of statistics and probability theory; tackle the basics of regression analysis, learn a multitude of data manipulation and visualization techniques; and are introduced to programming in R.

Creating Digital Scholarship Seminar

DCI 393 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

This seminar provides students with the skills, theoretical background, and methodological support to transform a work of traditional scholarship within an academic discipline into a public-facing work of digital scholarship. Students decide on a digital project in consultation with classmates and the instructor. Students survey and analyze examples of digital scholarship to determine what form each student's project should take.

Directed Individual Study

DCI 403 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

A course designed for students who wish to undertake a digital scholarship project of their own conception and execution. In consultation with a director, students plan an independent course of study which culminates in the production of a work of public-facing digital scholarship. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

DCI 403 - McCormick, Stephen P.

A course designed for students who wish to undertake a digital scholarship project of their own conception and execution. In consultation with a director, students plan an independent course of study which culminates in the production of a work of public-facing digital scholarship. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.