Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies Minor Requirements

2021 - 2022 Catalog

Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies minor

A minor in cultural heritage and museum studies requires completion of at least 21 credits from seven courses. In meeting the requirements of this minor, a student may not use more than nine credits (three courses) that are also used to meet the requirements of another major or minor.

  1. Take ARTH 146
  2. Take one course chosen from ARTH 101, 102, 140, 141, 170 and, when appropriate, ARTH 195
  3. Take one course chosen from HIST 230 or 200-level ARTH courses
  4. Take ARTH 398 or 453
  5. Take three additional courses: ARTH 125, 243, 245, 257, 274, 276, 288, 347, 356, 383, 398, 453; CHEM 156; CLAS 200, 338; SOAN 210, 211, 224, 286, and, when appropriate, SOAN 291
  1. Required course
  2. Take:

    • ARTH 146 - Introduction to Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies: Problems of Ownership and Curation
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyKerin

      Cultural heritage objects are powerful artifacts to own, display, and even destroy. But why? This introductory course explores the ways art and cultural heritage objects have been stolen, laundered, purchased, curated, and destroyed in order to express political, religious, and cultural messages. Case studies and current events are studied equally to shed light on practices of looting and iconoclasm. Some of the questions we consider: What is the relationship between art and war? Under what conditions should museums return artifacts to the country/ethnic group from which the artifacts originated? What role do auction houses play in laundering art objects? What nationalist agendas are at work when cultural heritage objects are claimed by modem nation states or terrorist groups?


  3. Take one course chosen from:
    • ARTH 101 - Survey of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyBent

      Chronological survey of Western art from the Paleolithic Age through the Middle Ages in Italy and Northern Europe. Examination of cultural and stylistic influences in the art and architecture of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Consideration of distinct interests of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Medieval Europe. Focus on major monuments and influential images produced up to circa 1400.


    • ARTH 102 - Survey of Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyKing, Lepage

      Chronological survey of Western art from the Renaissance through the present. Topics include the Renaissance, from its cultural and stylistic origins through the Mannerist movement; the Baroque and Rococo; the Neoclassical reaction; Romanticism and Naturalism; the Barbizon School and Realism; Impressionism and its aftermath; Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and the Postmodern reaction to Modernism.


    • ARTH 140 - Asian Art
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyKerin

      A survey of artistic traditions from South (including the Himalayan region), East, and Southeast Asia from roughly the 1st to the 18th centuries CE. The course focuses on a wide range of media - including architecture, sculpture, painting, textiles, and book arts - that serve a spectrum of religious and secular functions. The broad temporal, geographic, and topical scope of this course is meant to provide students with a basic understanding of not only the greatest artistic achievements and movements in Asia, but also the historical and political contexts that gave rise to these extraordinary pieces of art.


    • ARTH 170 - Arts of Mesoamerica and the Andes
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyLepage

      This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities requirement for the LACS minor. Survey of the art and architecture of Mesoamerica and the Andes before the arrival of the Europeans, with a focus on indigenous civilizations including the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and Inca. Art is contextualized in terms of religious, social, political, and economic developments in each region under discussion. The class includes a trip to the Virginia Museum of fine Arts in Richmond or the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.


    • and, when appropriate

    • ARTH 195 - Special Topics in Art History
      FDRHA
      Credits3 credits in fall or winter, 4 in spring

      Selected topics in art history with written and oral  reports. May be repeated if topics are different.


  4. Take one course chosen from:
    • HIST 230 - Discovering W&L's Origins Using Historical Archaeology
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyGaylord

      Not open to students who have taken SOAN 181 with the same description. This course introduces students to the practice of historical archaeology using W&L's Liberty Hall campus and ongoing excavations there as a case study. With archaeological excavation and documentary research as our primary sources of data. we use the methods of these two disciplines to analyze our data using tools from the digital humanities to present our findings. Critically, we explore the range of questions and answers that these data and methods of analysis make possible. Hands-on experience with data collection and analysis is the focus of this course, with students working together in groups deciding how to interpret their findings to a public audience about the university's early history. The final project varies by term but might include a short video documentary. a museum display, or a web page.


    • or

      200-level ARTH courses

  5. Take one course chosen from:
    • ARTH 398 - Seminar in Museum Studies
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteARTH 102 or ARTH 140, or instructor's consent; and sophomore, junior or senior standing. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
      FacultyHobbs

      An exploration of the history, philosophy and practical aspects of museums. Topics of discussion include governance and administration, collections, exhibitions and education. The course alternates weekly readings and class discussion with field trips to regional museums. Requires short papers and a major project.


    • ARTH 453 - Internship in Arts Management
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyArcher

      Supervised experience in an art gallery, art dealership, museum, or auction house approved by the Art and Art History Department. Requires written exercises and readings, in addition to curatorial projects devised in advance by the instructor and student. May be carried out during the summer.


  6. Take three additional courses chosen from:
    • ARTH 125 - The Business of Contemporary Art
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      FacultyKing, Staff

      This course combines finance, tax policy, marketing, economics, and art history to provide a 'nuts-and-bolts' view of how the contemporary art world operates. Appropriate for business students with an interest in contemporary art as well as museum studies and art history majors who wish to gain an understanding of business concepts in the art world, the course serves as preparation for students who may anticipate acquiring art for personal or business investment/use, serving on a museum board, pursuing employment in the art world, or advising high wealth clients on business matters related to art. Each topic begins with an overview of general principles before reviewing applications to the art world. For example, discussion of charitable giving covers the general tax rules of charitable deductions before discussing the specific rules related to art and museums. Additional course fee; see details link at http://go.wlu.edu/CourseOfferings.


    • ARTH 243 - Imaging Tibet
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      FacultyKerin

      An examination of images and imaging practices of the early 1900s to the present in order to define and analyze the ways in which both Western and Asian (particularly Tibetan and Chinese) artists have imagined Tibet and its people.


    • ARTH 245 - Ancient Cultures, New Markets: Modern and Contemporary Asian Art
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyKerin

      Meets simultaneously with ARTH 394B-01. Students may not register or receive credit for both. This course examines the art movements of the last one hundred years from India, China, Tibet, and Japan primarily through the lenses of the larger sociopolitical movements that informed much of Asia's cultural discourses: Colonialism, Post-Colonialism, Socialism, Communism, and Feminism. We also address debates concerning "non-Western" 20th-century art as peripheral to the main canons of Modern and Contemporary art. By the end of the course, students have created a complex picture of Asian art/artists, and have engaged broader concepts of transnationalism, as well as examined the roles of galleries, museums, and auction houses in establishing market value and biases in acquisition practices.


    • ARTH 257 - Dutch Arts, Patrons, and Markets
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyLepage

      During the 17th century, the practices of making and buying art boomed as never before in the Dutch Republic. With the creation of the first large-scale open art market, prosperous Dutch merchants, artisans, and civil servants bought paintings and prints in unprecedented numbers. Dutch 17th-century art saw the rise of new subjects, as landscapes, still lifes, and scenes of daily life replaced formerly dominant religious images and scenes from classical mythology. Portraiture also flourished in this prosperous atmosphere.


    • ARTH 274 - Art and Revolution: Mexican Muralism
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyLepage

      This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities requirement for the LACS minor. A survey of public monumental art produced by Mexican artists Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros in Mexico and the United States from 1910 to the 1970s. Lectures focus on art that promotes social ideals and the role that art played in building a new national consciousness in Mexico. Students also examine the impact of muralism throughout Latin America and the United States.


    • ARTH 276 - Chicana/o Art and Muralism: From the Street to the (Staniar) Gallery
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteOpen to all students
      FacultyLepage

      This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities requirement for the LACS minor. This class examines the process by which Chicana/o artists have garnered public attention and respect, taking their artworks from the peripheries of the art world to museum and gallery spaces. Using the Great Wall of Los Angeles as a connecting thread, this class considers the broad theme of identity creation and transformation as expressed by Chicana/o artists from the 1970s to the present.


    • ARTH 288 - Chinese Export Porcelain and the China Trade, 1500 to 1900
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyFuchs

      This course covers the development and history of Chinese export porcelain made for the European and American markets and its role as a commodity in the China Trade. Students examine Chinese export porcelain from several different perspectives, including art history, material culture, and economic history.


    • ARTH 347 - Forget Me Not: Visual Culture of Historic and Religious Memorials
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNo prerequisites. Appropriate for students of all class years
      FacultyKerin

      This class analyzes the visual material of memorial sites that shape social identity. Whether simple or elaborate in their construction, these creations allow people the space to connect with and/or honor a person or event from the historic or even mythological past. This global and thematic examination of memorials considers three primary foci: the built environment of a memorial; the performative role of visitors; and the function of memory at these sites.


    • ARTH 356 - Science in Art: Technical Examination of 17th-Century Dutch Paintings
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCHEM 156 in the preceding winter term
      FacultyUffelman

      Spring Term Abroad course. A survey of 17th-century Dutch history, art history, politics, religion, economics, etc., which links the scientific analysis of art to the art and culture of the time. The course begins on campus and then history, etc., will occur for a few days in Lexington and then proceed to Center for European Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands. Students visit numerous museums, hear guest lectures from faculty at Universiteit Maastricht, and observe at conservation laboratories at some of the major Dutch art museums. Students are graded by their performance on two research projects involving presentations and journals. Though students are not required to learn a world language to participate in the program, they are expected to learn key phrases in Dutch as a matter of courtesy to citizens of the host country.


    • ARTH 383 - Digital Florence
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      FacultyBent

      This course invites students to participate in and contribute to the Digital Humanities project "Florence As It Was: The Digital Reconstruction of a Medieval City". We consider how the built environment of Florence influenced--and was in turn influenced by--the culture, society, art, and history of the city. Students learn to translate historical, scholarly analysis into visually accessible formats, and collaborate on the "Florence As It Was" project, contributing to the digital mapping, data visualization, and virtual-reality reconstruction of medieval Florence.


    • ARTH 398 - Seminar in Museum Studies
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteARTH 102 or ARTH 140, or instructor's consent; and sophomore, junior or senior standing. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
      FacultyHobbs

      An exploration of the history, philosophy and practical aspects of museums. Topics of discussion include governance and administration, collections, exhibitions and education. The course alternates weekly readings and class discussion with field trips to regional museums. Requires short papers and a major project.


    • ARTH 453 - Internship in Arts Management
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyArcher

      Supervised experience in an art gallery, art dealership, museum, or auction house approved by the Art and Art History Department. Requires written exercises and readings, in addition to curatorial projects devised in advance by the instructor and student. May be carried out during the summer.


    • CHEM 156 - Science in Art
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyUffelman

      This course develops students' fundamental understanding of certain physical, chemical, biological, and geological concepts and utilizes that vocabulary and knowledge to discuss 17th-century Dutch art. The emphasis is on key aspects of optics, light, and chemical bonding needed to understand how a painting "works" and how art conservators analyze paintings in terms of conservation and authenticity, using techniques such as X-ray radiography, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, infrared microscopy, infrared reflectography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, UV photography, and laser ablation methods. When possible, the course develops modern notions of science with those of the 17th century in order to see how 17th-century science influenced 17th-century art.


    • CLAS 200 - Greek Art & Archaeology

      (ARTH 200)

      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyLaughy

      An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.


    • CLAS 338 - Pompeii
      FDRSS4
      Credits3 in fall-winter; 4 in spring
      FacultyBenefiel

      The site of ancient Pompeii presents a thriving Roman town of the first century AD, virtually frozen in time by the devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In this course, we examine Pompeii's archaeological remains-public buildings, domestic architecture, painting, artifacts, inscriptions, and graffiti-in order to reconstruct the life of the town. We also consider religion, games and entertainment, politics, and the structure of Roman society.


    • SOAN 210 - Field Methods in Archaeology
      FDRSL
      Credits4
      FacultyGaylord

      Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological field methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students study the cultural and natural processes that lead to the patterns we see in the archaeological record. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop a research design and to implement it with actual field excavation. We visit several field excavation sites in order to experience, first hand, the range of archaeological field methods and research interests currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students use the archaeological data to test hypotheses about the sites under consideration and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.


    • SOAN 211 - Laboratory Methods in Archaeology
      FDRSL
      Credits4
      FacultyGaylord

      Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological lab methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students process and catalogue archaeological finds ensuring they maintain the archaeological provenience of these materials. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop and test hypotheses about the site under consideration by analyzing the artifacts they themselves have processed. We visit several archaeology labs in order to experience, first hand, the range of projects and methods currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students then use the archaeological data to test their hypotheses and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.


    • SOAN 286 - Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History
      FDRSS4
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101 or instructor consent
      FacultyGuse, Markowitz

      This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.


    • and when appropriate

    • SOAN 291 - Special Topics in Anthropology
      Credits3-4

      A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.