Spring Term Courses

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Federal Tax Policy and Planning in Today's World

ACCT 256 - Bovay, John C. (Jack)

This course promotes thoughtful discussion and research of current topics in U.S. tax policy and planning. After an intensive introduction to basic federal tax concepts, each student writes a paper on a current federal tax topic.

Anatomy of a Fraud

ACCT 304 - Hess, Megan F.

This course examines the phenomena of financial statement fraud and discusses some of the key forensic accounting concepts and skills used to address this problem. Drawing on historical cases of financial statement fraud as well as the first-hand experience of the instructor, we search for the answers to questions such as: What causes executives to "cook the books"? What factors contribute to fraud? What can be done to prevent and detect it? How have regulations changed the landscape of corporate misconduct? What role do auditors, lawyers, employees, the media, and other stakeholders play?

Black Writers and the Allure of Paris

AFCA 286 - Hill, Michael D. / Hill, Lena M.

During two weeks on campus and two in Paris, students are immersed in the literary works of African American writers of the Harlem Renaissance through the mid-20th century, reading work by writers like Jessie Fauset, Gwendolyn Bennett, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and Chester Himes. In preparation for traveling to Paris, the site that represented new and promising possibilities for cultural exploration and artistic inspiration, we study how these literary texts examine the modern reality of racial identity. We also assess the significance of Paris as a site of cultural production and as a site of representation for early- to mid-20th century African American writers.

Science in Art: Technical Examination of 17th-Century Dutch Paintings

ARTH 356 - Uffelman, Erich S.

Spring Term Abroad course. A survey of 17th-century Dutch history, art history, politics, religion, economics, etc., which links the scientific analysis of art to the art and culture of the time. The course begins on campus and then history, etc., will occur for a few days in Lexington and then proceed to Center for European Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands. Students visit numerous museums, hear guest lectures from faculty at Universiteit Maastricht, and observe at conservation laboratories at some of the major Dutch art museums. Students are graded by their performance on two research projects involving presentations and journals. Though students are not required to learn a world language to participate in the program, they are expected to learn key phrases in Dutch as a matter of courtesy to citizens of the host country.

Seminar in Art History

ARTH 394 - Lazevnick, Ashley

Research in selected topics in art history with written and oral reports. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ARTH 394-01: Seminar in Art History: "Little Magazines": In the Archives and on the Web (3). Between 1880 and 1950, hundreds of small-press, non-commercial journals were published in cities around the world, their pages filled with a mixture of radical poetry, fiction, avant-garde art, manifestos, and criticism. These so-called "little magazines" were small in publication run but not in ambition. In fact, many scholars believe that little magazines were the single most important factor in fostering modernist and avant-garde thought during the period. Through an in-depth exploration of little magazines, this seminar brings together two types of scholarly research: archival and digital. We first explore these journals in-person and then examine their "digital" afterlives in the archives. What are the advantages and disadvantages of migrating historical material to a virtual platform? What new kinds of scholarship are made possible due to increased accessibility to digitized little magazines and how might access to such materials change our ideas about modernism? Students make trips to Special Collections at W&L and the University of Virginia, and maintain a personal website based on their research. (HA) Lazevnik.

Paris: History, Image, Myth

ARTS 223 - Bowden, Christa K. / Horowitz, Sarah

Students may not take this course and HIST 210. Participants in this course spend four weeks in Paris asking the following questions: how can photography capture Parisian life and Parisian spaces to document a sense of place? How can we use photography to observe the city's changing landscape as well as understand its rich past? Indeed, how has photography--the development of which is closely tied to Paris' history--altered the fabric of the city? Topics include the social and political transformations of the 19th century, the shifting geography of artistic Paris, and contemporary trends such as immigration and gentrification. Numerous museum and gallery visits will also play an important role in our time in Paris. This course is taught in close collaboration with HIST 210, creating an interdisciplinary context for students to explore the relationship of photography to the modern history and contemporary issues of Paris.

Environmental Biology: Endangered Plants of the Appalachians

BIOL 101 - Winder, Charles T.

Using case studies in plant endangerment as a focal point for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes and the impact of human activities on biodiversity, students gain fundamental insight into their relationship with the living world and the importance of preserving biological diversity through a combination of targeted readings, intensive discussions, and basic research in the field, Field activities take place in regional hotspots of plant endemism and give students experience in applied conservation research. Field sites and subject species vary from year to year.

CSI: W&L

BIOL 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Field Herpetology

BIOL 242 - Marsh, David M.

Field Herpetology is a research-based course on the ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Research projects vary from year-to-year and are designed to give students plenty of time on the field and exposure to a diverse assortment of amphibian and reptile species. Students should be prepared for hiking off-trail, wading in swamps, and catching live animals.

Topics in Biology

BIOL 297 - Bleicher, Sonny S.

Topics vary with instructor and term.

Spring 2020, BIOL 297-01: Topic: Urban Ecology (4). An integration of the complexity of interactions between living organisms and the rapidly changing, human-dominated, urban environment. Students study the implications of urbanization on water and nutrient cycles, invasive species, heat island effects, and how humans are altering the evolutionary trajectory of human commensal species. The course includes a week-long field component running an experiment on human-wildlife interactions. Bleicher.

Plant Functional Ecology

BIOL 332 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Information regarding the specific course topic and field trip schedule is made available in the fall. Through novel research projects in a variety of field settings (e.g., on-campus, Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains, The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem), this field-based laboratory course covers topics which investigate the vital roles that plants play in shaping Earth's ecosystems. Topics focus on the responses of native plants to environmental stresses, such as global climate change (elevated temperature and carbon dioxide and drought), herbivory, and invasive species. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments using a variety of species from intact plant communities. A review of the pertinent literature is used to develop and conduct a term research project. Laboratory course.

International Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability

BUS 191 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Do corporations have an obligation to manage their social impact in addition to maximizing sales, profits and stock price? What happens when these objectives are in conflict with each other? This course explores the relative roles of businesses, not-for-profits, government, and individual citizens in managing social and environmental impact. Student spend significant time exploring case studies and interacting with senior management of various companies. Recent examples include Carlsberg, Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group, Dunkin' Brands, Norden, Novo Nordisk, Pandora, Proctor & Gamble, Starbucks, and Unilever. The course culminates with two weeks in Copenhagen visiting numerous Danish companies and developing a group research project on a topic chosen by the students. The time abroad also includes cultural excursions to places such as Frederiksborg Castle and Tivoli, dinners with Danish families, a harbor/canal tour, and a closing dinner featuring New Nordic cuisine.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, BUS 301-01: Leading Teams (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. This course is taught at the Augusta Correctional Center in Craigsville, VA. Ten W&L students and ten inmates take the course together. Students learn from the professor and from one another as they explore the interpersonal processes and psychological factors that affect the way in which individuals interact and engage with one another. Students learn to understand conflict and how to effectively manage conflict in group settings. This course is mostly comprised of team activities and cases, which is intended to give students the tools, insight, and experience to better understand and manage teams. (EXP) Schatten

 

Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in a Business Environment

BUS 349 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

This course is designed to give students the abilities to negotiate successfully in a commercial environment and to create business solutions when a problem or dispute arises. Lectures, written materials, group projects, video, and role-play are utilized to explore the various theories of negotiation and types of dispute resolution, and to equip students with practical skills for forming and preserving business relationships and resolving business disputes as they occur.

Framing a Franchise: The Business of Entertainment

BUS 360 - Lind, Stephen J.

Entertainment franchises are big business that pervade our consumer culture. This course challenges students to evaluate the various practices used to "frame" such creative entertainment franchise properties. Students study a variety of global franchises, such as Peanuts, Star Wars, or Disney lines, analyzing key issues involved in creative product development. These issues include framing, fidelity, and audience management, as well practical processes like the role of development gatekeepers and product licensing structures. The course includes a one-week trip to Los Angeles to meet with entertainment industry executives at studio and key franchise locations.

Design Thinking

BUS 376 - Fox, Gavin L.

Open to both majors and non-majors. This course focuses on how to use design thinking to analyze problems and opportunities. The course is rooted in human-centered and ethical design considerations. The content draws heavily from creative writing, studio art, psychology, theater, and branding to help students engage in empathetic design solutions. The course follows the design thinking process developed by IDEO and follows through empathy, definition, ideation, prototyping, and testing.

Supervised Study Abroad

BUS 390 - Hess, Andrew M. (Drew)

These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.

Spring 2020, BUS 390-01: Supervised Study Abroad: Social Innovation in Scandinavia (4) . Experiential Learning. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. An introduction to the business, history, and culture behind the sustainability initiative in Scandinavia. It takes a theoretical and practical look at why and how social innovation has flourished in Scandinavia. The class lectures and case studies on design thinking, local history and culture, and social entrepreneurship are complemented with visits with area start-ups and entrepreneurs. While the DIS facility in Stockholm is the central location for the class, students also spend time traveling throughout Sweden and Denmark in order to meet with representatives from socially minded businesses and entrepreneurs, as well as from government agencies that are focused on the broad notion of sustainability. The course examines various approaches to tackling such pressing problems as climate change, immigration, and economic and gender equality. The first three weeks of the term are spent abroad, with the final week back on campus. A. Hess.

Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum

BUS 391 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor. May be taken twice for degree credit if the topics are significantly different.

The Psychology of Humor

CBSC 214 - Woodzicka, Julie A.

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding humor, covering traditional and contemporary theories of humor, along with social psychological, developmental, biological, and cognitive perspectives on humor. In addition, humor as a moderator of life stress is examined. Disparagement humor is a central topic, along with nonverbal markers of humor elicitation.

Seminar in Evolutionary Psychology

CBSC 215 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

The purpose of this course is to examine evolutionary theory as a means of explaining human behavior. The main premise is that behaviors such as cooperation, aggression, mate selection, and intelligence exist because individuals exhibiting these behaviors were more likely to produce healthy offspring that perpetuated those behaviors (i.e., natural selection). We evaluate the validity of this argument in a number of areas of human behavior and also discuss how culture has shaped our genes. Evolutionary psychology is not an area of psychology, like social psychology or cognitive psychology, but is instead a lens through which all human behavior can be explained. Though it is tempting to engage in "arm chair" application of evolutionary theory to behavior, this is a science course; all arguments must be backed up with data.

Current Advances in Psychological Science

CBSC 295 - Jenney, Christopher B.

Seminar topics and specific prerequisites vary with instructor and term. These seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the experimental research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, CBSC 295-01: Addiction: A Brain Disease of Chronic Relapse and Implications for Science, Society and Government (3) . No prerequisites. This course provides students with insight into the dynamic and ongoing relationship between laboratory research, clinical practice, and societal policy as it relates to substance use disorder (SUD). Classroom lectures, invited speakers, and field trips provide students with an up-to-date understanding of the physiological mechanisms mediating SUD based on preclinical and clinical data. To provide students with societal and government perspectives on SUD, we discuss policies in place to control illicit drug use and view first-hand the impact on society of untreated substance abuse. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of addiction at the research, clinical, societal, and governmental levels with the purpose of training students to critically observe clinical and societal needs and address them through experimental design. (SC) Jenney.

Current Advances in Psychological Science

CBSC 295 - Brindle, Ryan C.

Seminar topics and specific prerequisites vary with instructor and term. These seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the experimental research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, CBSC 295-02: Current Advances in Psychological Science: Sleep, Health and Society (3). An Underappreciated Health Emergency (3). No prerequisite.  Sleep (or the lack thereof) is increasingly becoming recognized as a major health concern at the societal level leading to poor physical and mental health. This course examines the basic functions of sleep and how deficiencies in sleep lead to poor health at the population level. Students participate in discussion groups, perform a self-study of sleep, and design a sleep improvement campaign. (SC) Brindle.

Spring-Term Topics in Cognitive and Behavioral Science

CBSC 296 - Mischel, Jennifer A. (Jenny)

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, PSYC 296-01: Navigating Cyberbullying: Discovering Ways to Create a Healthy School Climate (3). No prerequisite. College students have increasingly relied on cyber interactions to communicate. Access to these forums can be efficient and beneficial yet can also be a source of angst with the potential to cause long-lasting detrimental outcomes. We explore deeper understanding of what cyberbullying is, why it might occur, compelling websites and apps that address the behavior, and access to potentially effective coping strategies for college-aged students. Students participate in discussion groups, create and conduct a study to better understand the perspectives of other W&L students, analyze and synthesize data, and then use that information to design a website and support-group program for W&L. (SS3) Mischel.

 

The Pursuit of Happiness

CBSC 300 - Murdock, Karla

Students examine and discuss the meaning and significance of happiness, explore pathways and barriers to happiness from scientific, theoretical, and philosophical perspectives, and engage in a thoughtful and proactive process of self-examination with regard to personal ideals, goals, and mechanisms of happiness. Students become immersed in experiential learning opportunities to sample potential pathways to well-being and contribute to the greater good through community service.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Abry, Andrea C.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course. Additional course fee.

CSI: W&L

CHEM 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Spring-Term Special Topics in Chemistry

CHEM 299 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Studies of special topics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Possible topics include medicinal chemistry, materials chemistry, or atmospheric chemistry and the environment.

Spring 2020, CHEM 299-01: Topic: Mechanisms of Stem-Cell Growth and Differentiation (4). Prerequisite: CHEM 241. A practical guide to mammalian stem-cell biology. We explore the molecular underpinnings of stem-cell maintenance with a focus on cellular signaling pathways and stem-cell niche microenvironments, both in the embryo and the adult. We study the biochemistry of directed differentiation and lineage determination and discuss the function of stem cells in adult tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. Within a laboratory setting, students culture and maintain embryonic stem cells, perform pluripotency assays, and direct embryonic stem cells to differentiate into neural progenitors and cardiac muscle cells. Friend.

The Athenian Acropolis

CLAS 214 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

In this course. we study the art and architecture of the Acropolis, from the Neolithic period to today. with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods. Our study is based upon a detailed and chronology survey of the buildings. dedications, and religious practices conducted on the Acropolis. We conclude the course with a discussion of the Acropolis in the post-Classical period, and the meaning of the Acropolis for Greeks today.

The Roman Emperor

CLAS 343 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

An exploration of the figure of the Roman Emperor in art, architecture, monuments, and the urban fabric of the ancient world. Analysis and assessment use innovative digital scholarly resources that are currently available to students and scholars of the classical world. Each week, a different discipline within Classics (e.g., history and historiography, epigraphy, numismatics) is presented, followed by hands-on assignments working with the scholarly tools that can be used to query or conduct research in that field. Group projects focus on a particular time period and evaluate how the figure of the Roman emperor, his public relations, Roman society, and the expression of political power shifted over the centuries of empire.

Modeling and Simulation

CSCI 256 - Watson, Cody A.

Standard practices and applications of modeling and simulation. We explore ways to model complex systems that incorporate disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics. Students learn critical-thinking skills when reading, comprehending, and analyzing real-world systems that they then create models for. Readings are supplemented by projects which reflect scenarios where modeling and simulation would be useful. Students are evaluated on a series of coding projects, class discussion, weekly quizzes, and exams measuring the ability to identify opportunities for application and to simulate models and their environments. A final project focuses on an open-modeling opportunity in biology, chemistry, or physics

Advanced Topics in Robotics

CSCI 316 - Levy, Simon D.

A review of advanced topics in robotics, including well-established topics like Bayesian filtering and control theory and current trends like intelligent robots and neuromorphic control. Readings in these areas are reinforced by hands-on projects with robot hardware and simulators. Students present their final projects at the culminating annual Spring Term Festival. Each class meeting includes lecture, discussion, and project work done in teams of one to four students, with weekly quizzes on the readings.

New Dark Age

DCI 271 - Brooks, Mackenzie K.

Are we living in a "New Dark Age"? Artist and writer James Bridle argues that the abundance of information intended to enlighten the world has, in practice, darkened it. This course takes a big-picture look at the interconnected impact of technology on the world around us. Is it enough to learn to code or think computationally? Through research, hands-on assignments, and local trips, we seek to understand what has led to our present technological moment and where we can go from here. We cover topics such as climate change, e-waste, big data, algorithmic bias, and automation.

Cool Japan: A Visual Journey through Anime, Manga, Robots, Language, and Culture

EALL 175 - Naito, Yumiko

Taught in English, this course examines a variety of visual artifacts such as manga, anime, and unique social phenomena, observable in current Japan through reading materials and discussions, to understand Japanese culture and society. Students learn the visually beautiful writing system of Japanese and onomatopoeia, which is used extensively in Japanese manga. Through hands-on experiences, students gain a deeper understanding and multicultural perspective of the culture and society of Japan

East Asian Cinema

EALL 215 - Zhu, Yanhong

This course provides an introduction to and overview of contemporary East Asian cinema, including the Chinese-language cinemas of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and those of Japan and Korea. It focuses on the flourishing cinema of East Asia since the 1980s and provides a solid foundation in the successes and dominant tendencies of contemporary East Asian cinema and culture. Among the aims of the course are examining ways in which the contemporary East Asian cinemas and cultures are in dialogue with one another and looking at specific conditions and cultural forces at work in each unique case. The course also explores how the cinemas of East Asia reflect the changing cultural, economic, historical, political and social conditions of each country and how these cinemas and cultures are part of a larger redefinition of the idea of a national culture. Screenings and readings consist of exemplary works from each East Asian culture, organized around specific motifs, such as history, memory, identity, communication, love, and death.

Current Public Policy Debates

ECON 222 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris) / Shester, Katharine L.

The course is an applied public finance and policy course that focuses on current policy debates. While the topics are updated with each offering, students in this course examine options for replacing the Affordable Care Act, analyze whether the country should adopt a universal voucher program for K-12, discuss containing the cost of college, and explore options for securing the long-term financial stability of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. We use economic theory to frame the each of the policy questions. Students conduct additional research on each of the topics, debate topics, and author policy opinion papers.

Exploring Childhood in Scandinavia: Comparing Policies and Practices to the U.S.

ECON 239 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim) / Sigler, Haley W.

Study Abroad Course. An exploration of childhood in Scandinavia and the United States. Students spend one week in the U.S. and three weeks in Denmark, Sweden, and/or Finland. Students have experiences inside schools, daycare facilities, and preschools in both economically advantaged and disadvantaged areas and speak with administrators and policymakers. With additional readings focusing on education policy and broader family policy in each country, students engage in discussions and reflections on the relative strengths and weaknesses of policies in each country.

Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History

ECON 286 - Markowitz, Harvey J. / Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi ) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.

Supervised Study Abroad

ECON 288 - Davies, Martin H.

For advanced students, the course covers a topic of current interest for which foreign travel provides a unique opportunity for significantly greater understanding. Emphasis and location changes from year to year and is announced each year, well in advance of registration. Likely destinations are Europe, Latin America, Africa, or Asia. This course may not be repeated.

Spring 2020, ECON 288-01: The Modern Economy of the United Kingdom: Great Shocks In Great Britain (3). The objective of the course is to give the student insight into the progression of the UK economy over the past 40 years. We examine four major events and the economic links between them. These events are the Thatcher Revolution (the Great Transformation), the Great Moderation, the Great Recession and finally the possible Brexit (some might call this the Great Mistake!). We examine each period through the lens of economic theory and empirical evidence, looking at both national and global influences. Our overall goal is to gain insight into the political-economy of the United Kingdom over the entire period, 1979-2019. While the material in the course is specific to the UK, the approach to the material, and the tools used, are applicable to other economies. Davies.

Health: A Social Science Exploration

ECON 376 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Much of the work done by consulting companies, banks, insurance companies, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, etc., is based on applied statistical and econometric analysis. This course helps prepare students for careers in these environments using a hands-on approach and emphasizing the use of data and student-directed research in the specific context of health-related issues. Example of these issues include obesity, vaccinations, pre- and post-natal care, contraceptive use, or child mortality; possible determinants include poverty, education, or distance to the nearest health clinic or hospital. An interdisciplinary perspective is highlighted, as is the use and importance of quantitative analysis for public policy.

Fieldwork in Education

EDUC 210 - Moffa, Eric D.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This course provides students an opportunity to observe, assist, or tutor in a local educational setting. It is intended for those students who wish to explore education as a profession or who are interested in post-graduate programs and jobs in education and education policy. Students in the teacher-licensure program should enroll in the practicum courses that correspond to upper level education courses. May be repeated for up to 3 credits total.

Exploring Childhood in Scandinavia: Comparing Policies and Practices to the U.S.

EDUC 239 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim) / Sigler, Haley W.

Study Abroad Course. An exploration of childhood in Scandinavia and the United States. Students spend one week in the U.S. and three weeks in Denmark, Sweden, and/or Finland. Students have experiences inside schools, daycare facilities, and preschools in both economically advantaged and disadvantaged areas and speak with administrators and policymakers. With additional readings focusing on education policy and broader family policy in each country, students engage in discussions and reflections on the relative strengths and weaknesses of policies in each country.

Eco-Writing

ENGL 207 - Green, Leah N.

An expeditionary course in environmental creative writing. Readings include canonical writers such as Frost, Emerson, Auden, Rumi, and Muir, as well as contemporary writers such as W.S. Merwin, Mary Oliver, Janice Ray, Gary Snyder, Annie Dillard, Thich Nhat Hanh, Wendell Berry, and Robert Hass. We take weekly "expeditions" including creative writing hikes, a landscape painting exhibit, and a Buddhist monastery. "Expeditionary courses" sometimes involve moderate to challenging hiking. We research the science and social science of the ecosystems explored, as well as the language of those ecosystems. The course has two primary aspects: (1) reading and literary analysis of eco-literature (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) and (2) developing skill and craft in creating eco-writing through the act of writing in these genres and through participation in weekly "writing workshop."

 

Topics in Creative Writing

ENGL 210 - Harrington, Jane F.

A course in the practice of creative writing, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different.

Spring 2020, ENGL 210-01: Topic in Creative Writing: Writing for Children (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. Limited enrollment. Students identify and analyze juvenile literature that has endured over time; read and discuss academic essays about children's literature; become familiar with issues and trends in children's publishing via blogs, social media, and articles written by industry professionals; work from prompts to hone skills at writing for children; engage in a dialogue and writing workshop with a current children's author; and create a work of length for children through a recursive process that involves peer workshopping, instructor feedback, revisions, and analysis. (HA) Harrington.

The Music, Folklore, and Literature of Ireland

ENGL 238 - Dobbins, Christopher L. (Chris) / Conner, Marc C.

This course engages the music, folklore and literature of Ireland and the ways that the creation of these art forms is related to the places in which the art was created. We cover a wide variety of the history of Irish art and focus on the importance of place in the written, oral, and aural traditions of the island. Students study a range of musical compositions, styles, and traditions alongside the rich body of Irish folklore and folk customs that underlie these musical creations, as well as the rich literature that informs all of these artistic efforts. After the first week on campus, the remainder of the course takes place in Dingle in the West of Ireland and in Dublin.

Reading Lolita in Lexington

ENGL 285 - Brodie, Laura F.

This class uses Azar Nafisi's memoir, Reading Lolita in Tehran , as a centerpiece for learning about Islam, Iran, and the intersections between Western literature and the lives of contemporary Iranian women. We read The Great Gatsby , Lolita , and Pride and Prejudice , exploring how they resonated in the lives of Nafisi's students in Tehran. We also visit The Islamic Center of Washington and conduct journalistic research into attitudes about Iran and Islam.

Black Writers and the Allure of Paris

ENGL 286 - Hill, Michael D. / Hill, Lena M.

During two weeks on campus and two in Paris, students are immersed in the literary works of African American writers of the Harlem Renaissance through the mid-20th century, reading work by writers like Jessie Fauset, Gwendolyn Bennett, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and Chester Himes. In preparation for traveling to Paris, the site that represented new and promising possibilities for cultural exploration and artistic inspiration, we study how these literary texts examine the modern reality of racial identity. We also assess the significance of Paris as a site of cultural production and as a site of representation for early- to mid-20th century African American writers.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Smout, Kary

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ENGL 293-01: Topics in American Literature: Business in American Literature and Film (4). In his 1776 book The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith tells a powerful story of the free market as a way to organize our political and economic lives, a story that has governed much of the world ever since. This course studies that story (also called capitalism), considers alternate stories of human economic organization, such as those of American Indian tribes, and sees how these stories have been acted out in American business and society. We study novels, films, short stories, non-fiction essays, autobiographies, advertisements, websites, some big corporations, and some businesses in the Lexington area. Our goal is not to attack American business but to understand its characteristic strengths and weaknesses so we can make the best choices about how to live and work happily in a free-market society. (HL) Smout.

Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies

ENGL 295 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

Students in this course study a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the texts. Involves field trips, film screenings, service learning, and/or other special projects, as appropriate, in addition to 8-10 hours per week of class meetings. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ENGL 295-01: Spring Term Seminar in Literary Studies: Transforming Literature: Fan Fiction, Literary Mashups and Other Canon Fodder (4). This course considers ways that people take works of literature, classic or otherwise, and transform them into something new. We read literary works ranging from "The Yellow Wallpaper" to "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" to Sherlock Holmes stories, as well as cartoons, poems, videos and text conversations that remake, remix and transform those literary works. We think about what makes something literature, what makes something fan fiction, and what fan fiction can show us about classic works of literature. We also create our own literary transformations, analyze the role of the internet in fan culture, and experiment with transformative technologies. (HL) Bufkin.

Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies

ENGL 295 - Kharputly, Nadeen

Students in this course study a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the texts. Involves field trips, film screenings, service learning, and/or other special projects, as appropriate, in addition to 8-10 hours per week of class meetings. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ENGL 295-02: Spring Term Seminar in Literary Studies: Postcolonial and Decolonial Poetry (3). A study of postcolonial and decolonial themes and concerns, including decolonization, indigeneity, protest and resistance, identity and migration, through poetic form. Students develop an understanding of how postcolonial poets have adapted existing poetic forms or created new ones to reflect the struggle for land, nationhood, individual human rights, and independence in the latter half of the 20th century to the present day. (HL) Kharputly.

Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies

ENGL 295 - Millan, Diego A.

Students in this course study a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the texts. Involves field trips, film screenings, service learning, and/or other special projects, as appropriate, in addition to 8-10 hours per week of class meetings. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ENGL 295-03: Spring Term Seminar in Literary Studies: Funny Women (3). Is comedy gendered? How does what makes us laugh, and how we make others laugh, position us in the world? What does the intersection of comedy and performance have to show us about identity formation in relation to race, class, and gender? How have women, in particular, mobilized comedy to disrupt, to refuse, or to otherwise affect structures of power? In seeking answers to these questions and more, this seminar examines a history of funny women and the many cultural expectations that surround them. For instance, we consider other meanings of "funny"—as oddity or curiosity—to explore the many cultural associations that both police women's behavior and provide foundations for imagining resistance. Possible authors/genres include Fran Ross, Alison Bechdel, Tina Fey, Toni Cade Bambara, stand-up comedy, drama, memoir, graphic novel/comic strips. In addition to more traditional styles of writing (formal analysis, argument-driven essays), students have an opportunity to generate their own comedic/creative projects. (HL) Millan.

Literary Book Publishing

ENGL 304 - Staples, Beth A.

This course is an introduction to the publishing industry, its culture and commerce. We examine the history of the industry and how it operates today, with an emphasis on active learning and practice. This class consists, in part, of active discussions with industry professionals, studying the life of a single book: its author, its agent, its editor, its book designer, its publisher. It gives you an overview of how the publishing industry works through the eyes of the people who work in it. It also gives you a chance to put what you learn into practice. Using a book you're working on (or a theoretical book you may someday write), you compose a query letter, design a book jacket, and create marketing material in support of your project. The term culminates with a book auction where students form publishing teams and bid on the books they would most like to publish.

Fresh/Local/Wild: The Poetics of Food

ENGL 307 - Miranda, Deborah A.

This class visits fresh/local/wild food venues each week, where sensory explorations focus on all aspects of foraging, creating, adapting and eating food. Coursework includes guided writing exercises based on the landscape/geography of food both in the field and classroom, with in-depth readings that help us turn topics like food politics, food insecurity, sustainable agriculture and genetically modified foods into poetry. Individual handmade chapbooks of the term's poems serve as the final product. A service learning component is also included in the course through Campus Kitchen.

Whitman vs Dickinson

ENGL 356 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

In this seminar, students read two wild and wildly different U.S. poets alongside queer theory about temporality. Since we are discussing queerness in the past, present, and future, we will also consider 2lst-century reception of 19th-century literature and history, and students will participate in a Nineteenth-Century Poetry Slam.

Supervised Study in Great Britain

ENGL 386 - Pickett, Holly C. / Levy, Jemma A.

An advanced seminar in British literature carried on in Great Britain, with emphasis on independent research and intensive exposure to British culture. Changing topics, rotated yearly from instructor to instructor, and limited in scope to permit study in depth.

Introduction to Engineering Design

ENGN 250 - D'Alessandro, Kacie C.

This course introduces students to the principles of engineering design through first-hand experience with a design project that culminates in a design competition. In this project-based course, the students gain an understanding of computer-aided drafting, machining techniques, construction methods, design criteria, progress- and final-report writing, and group presentations.

Special Topics in Engineering

ENGN 395 - Erickson, Jonathan C. (Jon)

Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science. Topics selected based on student interest. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ENGN 395-01: Special Topics In Engineering: Applied Signal Processing (3). Prerequisite: ENGN/PHYS 225 or MATH 222. Integrates theory and practice of digital signal processing techniques emphasizing time-frequency analysis, digital filtering, and source separation. Applications include biomedical problems (e.g., heartbeat detection); civil/structural health monitoring (seismic damage detection); music (digital sound synthesis); and data compression (e.g., jpeg and mp3 audio and video). In the final week, students propose signal processing solutions to open-ended research problems. Erickson.

 

Campus Sustainability Consulting and LEED Expertise

ENV 220 - Trimmer, S Morris (Morris)

ENV 120 provides a large systems context for this course (ENV 220) but is not a prerequisite. Using the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating systems and working alongside sustainability consultants, students investigate the W&L campus grounds and facilities and develop detailed action plans for the university, in order to meet sustainability and climate goals and maximize credits toward a LEED Campus designation. The consulting teams present their findings to decision makers in order to assist W&L in achieving LEED Silver Certification or better for all new construction and major renovations.

Ethnographic Study of Modern-Day Slavery in Ghana: Creating Short Documentary Film

FILM 251 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

Spring Term Abroad. An examination of culture and social-justice issues in Ghana, particularly focusing on issues of modern- day slavery. Together, we study Ghanaian culture, visiting cultural sites and learning about how the country is faring with modern-day slavery. We collect true stories through ethnographic study, interviewing and filming to create short documentaries for presentation on campus at the end of the spring term. We examine the development of modern-day slavery in Ghana, visiting organizations and government programs that are working on the issue as well as listening to the stories of those who have been rescued from slavery.

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

After intensive collective reading and discussion of three Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.

Music in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

FILM 285 - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

How does music add power and meaning to a film? What are the connections between the flow of music and the flow of a dramatic narrative? How does music enhance visual images? The course will focus on the pre-existent classical compositions chosen by Stanley Kubrick for his movies 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980). The ability to read music is not a requirement for this course.

Spring Term Topics in French Civilization

FREN 285 - Lambeth, John A.

A study of significant aspects of culture and civilization through direct experience abroad in France and/or Francophone countries. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, FREN 285-01: Topic in French Civilization: Contemporary France Through Film (4). Experiential Learning. Prerequisite: FREN 162, FREN 164, or instructor consent. Taught entirely in the southern French city of Toulouse. Offers an alternative view of France from what many experience in Paris, with goals boosting students' confidence in spoken and written French; developing awareness of social issues in contemporary French society; and learning how to function independently abroad. During the four weeks abroad, students are introduced to the most important issues in modern French society, including immigration, university life, social justice, and art and culture. We use contemporary French cinema as a platform for discussion, debate, and advanced grammar review. Class sessions are conversation-intensive and include review of French grammar through cultural and conversational contexts. An integral part of the course is connecting the issues examined through film with the urban and social fabric of Toulouse. Students live with host families and go on four different excursions to other sites and cities in southern France, so they use their French to interact with local residents and to investigate cultural and social issues on site. They are also enrolled in an intensive language course taught by a French professor. Lambeth.

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Hinkle, Margaret A.

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2020, GEOL 105-01: Earth Lab: Dam It! An Environmental Exploration of Dams (4). An exploration of the impacts of dams from an environmental, hydrologic, geologic, and historical perspective. Dams are used for a variety of purposes--storing water provided by rivers to secure a water supply, mitigating flooding, producing electric power, operating mills. As we look to the future of our energy sector, interest in hydroelectric power is increasing. However, damming rivers can have substantial impacts on rivers, affecting ecosystems and environmental systems up- and down-stream of the dam. The hydrologic and geomorphological changes induced by dams are explored in detail as a basis for learning foundational concepts in geoscience. (SL) Hinkle.

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Lyon, Eva C.

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2020, GEOL 105-02: Earth Lab: The Geology of National Parks (4). A study of the processes that formed and are continuing to shape this continent through examples from some of our most scenic and special places: the national parks. With examples from throughout the national park system, we examine how different rock types form, the scale of geologic time, and earth-surface processes. Each park tells a story: some stories go back billions of years, but most of these stories are still being written, particularly as we consider the idea that we are "loving our parks to death". Thus, we also think about how the parks are likely to respond to changing climate and other human impacts. The course includes short overnight field trips during the first three weeks and a week-long trip out west during the final week of class. (SL) Lyon.

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Knapp, Elizabeth P.

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2020, GEOL 105-03: FS: Earth Lab: Geology of Hawai'i (4). First-Year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Instructor consent required. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. An introductory study of earth science and the geology of the Hawaiian Islands taught for two weeks in Hawai'i. Its purpose is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to observe a wide variety of geologic processes in action. This course entails close interaction with the faculty and intensive study amongst the students during the term. (SL) Knapp.

 

Field Methods in the Appalachians

GEOL 230 - Connors, Christopher D. (Chris)

An introduction to the study of geology in the field with special attention to the methods used by geologists to make, record, and interpret field observations. The course includes study of and field trips in the central Appalachian region.

Regional Geology

GEOL 373 - Rahl, Jeffrey M. / Kitch, Gabriella D.

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside fieldwork with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. Information about the course is available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements

 

Paris: History, Image, Myth

HIST 210 - Horowitz, Sarah / Bowden, Christa K.

Students may not take this course and ARTS 223. Participants in this course spend four weeks in Paris asking the following questions: how has history shaped Parisian life and Parisian spaces? How can we use photography to document the city's changing landscape as well as understand its rich past? Indeed, how has photography--the development of which is closely tied to Paris' history--altered the fabric of the city? Topics include the social and political transformations of the 19th century, the shifting geography of artistic Paris, and contemporary trends such as immigration and gentrification. This course is taught in close collaboration with ARTS 223, creating an interdisciplinary context for students to explore the relationship of photography to the modern history and contemporary issues of Paris.

 

Pillage, Peddling and Piety: Travel in the Middle Ages

HIST 226 - Vise, Melissa E.

Perhaps contrary to expectation, Medieval people traveled extensively for trade and profit, pilgrimage and piety, conquest and gain, and even for pleasure. These motives cut across the cultures of the medieval world to encompass Muslims, Christians, and Jews and led these people to places both proximate to and far distant from Europe. We explore the medieval world as a world that moved. To that end, in addition to some more traditional academic exercises, students create a group mapping project using a host of digital tools that can communicate movement, exchange, and interaction. Topics include pilgrimage, trade, economic systems, holy war, gender, race, and chivalry.

The Art of Command during the American Civil War

HIST 244 - Myers, Barton A.

This seminar examines the role of military decision-making, the factors that shape it and determine its successes and failures, by focusing on four Civil War battles: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Wilderness. Extensive reading and writing. Battlefield tours.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Huezo, Stephanie M.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, HIST 269-01: Topic: Space, Place, and Power in Latinx History (3). An examination of how space, place, and power have been produced, experienced, and politicized in Latinx History. We live and function in spaces and places that have been historically produced. As we experience these spaces and places, we imbue meaning to them. How do we understand space as the product and source of our day-to-day experiences? How does a sense of place affect our identity and sense of belonging? What does power have to do with all of this?  Readings and assignments help us understand how political, social, economic, and cultural practices have produced space and place within Latinx communities. By focusing specifically on Latinx social movements, students come to recognize how Latinx communities have been at the center of these discussions of space, place, and power and to examine how they have created, claimed, affirmed, and disrupted physical space throughout history. (HU) Huezo .

History of Kyrgyzstan from the Silk Road to the Present: Crossroads of Empire, Culture, and Religion

HIST 286 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

Experiential Learning. An analysis of the history of empire, culture, and religion in the Central Asia nation of Kyrgyzstan. Together with the course instructor, students travel to Bishkek, attend courses taught by faculty of the American University of Central Asia, and visit important sites and landmarks within the city. The program includes an excursion of several days to the northern and southern shores of Lake lssyk-Kul, where students experience rural, nomadic life, hike in the mountains, and stay in yurts. Students keep a daily log and write a research paper on a topic of their choice with the instructor's approval.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Politics and History: The Machiavellian Moment

HIST 307 - Peterson, David S.

Is it better to be loved or feared? How much of our destiny do we control? When are societies fit for self-rule? Can people be forced to be good? Niccolò Machiavelli, arguably the first and most controversial modern political theorist, raises issues of universal human and political concern. Yet he did so in a very specific context--the Florence of the Medici, Michelangelo, and Savonarola--at a time when Renaissance Italy stood at the summit of artistic brilliance and on the threshold of political collapse. We draw on Machiavelli's personal, political, historical, and literary writings, and readings in history and art, as a point of entry for exploring Machiavelli's republican vision of history and politics as he developed it in the Italian Renaissance and how it addresses such perennial issues as the corruption and regeneration of societies.

 

Seminar: 9/11 and Modern Terrorism

HIST 367 - Senechal, Roberta H.

Terrorism is a form of collective violence famously illustrated in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon near Washington on September 11, 2001. This course provides an intensive interdisciplinary examination of the origins of the 9/11 attacks and the terrorist organization that launched them. The course also addresses the impact of the attacks and the future prospects of mass violence against civilians, as well as the role of the media in covering (and dramatizing) terrorism. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), the logic of terrorist recruitment, and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction.

 

Research Preparation in the Sciences

INTR 200 - I'Anson, Helen

This course is composed of seminar and workshop modules on such topics as: critical reading of research papers; use of relevant primary literature in experimental design; integrative approaches to research questions; use of quantitative methods and modeling; data acquisition, record-keeping, and analysis; research ethics; introduction to specific lab techniques used in research; scientific writing and data presentation. In addition, students develop and present a research plan for their research project that is discussed and critiqued by the whole group. Laboratory course.

Study Abroad Reflections and Assessment

INTR 298 - Rush, Mark E. / Irby, Cynthia G. (Cindy)

Before the end of the last term in which a student is on approved study abroad, the student submits to the Director of International Education a reflective essay, to be designed and assigned for each term abroad by the faculty's Global Learning Advisory Committee. The committee reviews student reflections, assesses them with regard to Washington and Lee's learning outcomes for study abroad, and issues a brief report at the end of each academic year.

Spring Option

INTR 995 - Dittman, D Scott (Scott)

The Spring Option allows students to use the spring term of their sophomore, junior and/or senior years to engage in an internship, service program, employment, travel or educational program that will broaden and enhance their collegiate education. The faculty offer this opportunity to encourage students to seek creative outlets not provided in the normal academic setting. Spring option policies and requirements can be found under Academic Regulations .

INTR 998 - Dittman, D Scott (Scott) / Irby, Cynthia G. (Cindy) / Rush, Mark E.

Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Japanese

JAPN 100 - Ikeda Yuba, Janet

Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to introduce the Japanese language and culture to students with little or no previous language background. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.

Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Japanese

JAPN 115 - Ikeda Yuba, Janet

Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Japanese, to introduce the culture and society of Japan, and to prepare students for second-year Japanese study. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.

The Magazine: Past, Present, Future

JOUR 215 - Cumming, Douglas O.

Magazines are probably the most resilient mass medium we have, which is good news in the digital age. Even though the magazine business was hit hard in recent years, a look at its past and future is far more cheering. In this class, students learn how to investigate a magazine from the past as a way of understanding the magazine business from the inside. They also learn from current magazine editors, writers, and publishers, with a four-night trip to New York City (additional fee required). And students create teams to produce a tablet-ready magazine prototype.

Digital Media and Society

JOUR 270 - Artwick, Claudette G.

Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.

Topics in Journalism and Mass Communications

JOUR 295 - Abah, Adedayo O. (Dayo)

Study of a selected topic in journalism or mass communications. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

Spring 2020, JOUR 295-01: Say What? Landmark First Amendment Cases and their Implications for Speech in the 21st Century (3). This course helps students to understand the First Amendment in context and the different forms of expressions that have shaped its jurisprudence. The U.S. Supreme Court's interpretations of expression have implications for all aspects of American political life and often involve protection of minority, often unpopular, viewpoints from being overpowered by the majority, or by the government. Abah.

Topics in Journalism and Mass Communications

JOUR 295 - Bhalla, Nandini

Study of a selected topic in journalism or mass communications. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

Spring 2020, JOUR 295-02: Media Stereotypes: Women, Minorities, and Yoga (3). No prerequisite. A media-literacy course to help students better understand the mass media's representation of minorities, and especially women through different lenses including yoga practice. We examine whether and/or how this has changed over time, what forces have affected change (or not), and the current state of their representation. Students become improved critical consumers of the mass media, particularly as it relates to the representation of minorities and women, and to use critical thinking skills to understand (1) how media is stereotyping, (2) media's target audience, and (3) the impact of stereotyping. Bhalla.

Topics in Journalism and Mass Communications

JOUR 295 - Colon, Aly A.

Study of a selected topic in journalism or mass communications. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

Spring 2020, JOUR 295-03: Religion and Reporting (4). Open to non-majors. This class explores how the news media cover religion and whether this coverage helps or hinders understanding. Where do reporters turn for facts about religions? Do journalists reflect accurately and authentically religious lives? How do the news media depict people with extreme beliefs? Students examine these and other questions through readings, discussion, and interviews with experts and people of faith. Field trips allow personal exposure to places of worship. Colón.

In-depth Reporting

JOUR 356 - Locy, Toni R.

The principles and techniques of developing and creating enterprising, heavily researched journalistic work for the mass media. Students produce in-depth work that they showcase on a website. Extensive group work is required.

Media Management & Entrepreneurship

JOUR 377 - Swasy, Alecia

An examination of trends and challenges in media management, including a close examination of industry economics, changing reader and viewer habits, revenue and profit pressures, and labor and management issues unique to the news profession. For Spring 2020, the seminar's focus is on women in the media business, an exploration of how a diverse group of women are reshaping the media business through creation of niche news beats at legacy companies --such as the Washington Post's Tracy Jan covering the intersection of race and the economy--or building new hybrid business models like "American INNO" that mix news, branded content, and events to attract more millennial readers and customers.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Merritt, Adrienne N.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, LIT 295-01: After Namibia: Afro-German Poetics, Activism, and Hip Hop (4). Prerequisites: Completion of FDR FW writing requirement. An examination of the history of race and identity politics in German-speaking cultures, beginning with the German colonialist past in Namibia and the ways in which Afro- and Black Germans, as well as other marginalized persons seek to create a space for their racial identities within a culture that seeks to define race solely as a historical social construct. Our focus is the cultural production and activism of black and brown voices in Germany and how they mediate the concept of Germanness as whiteness and the silence about the atrocities of German colonization. (HL) Merritt .

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Shehata, Asmaa

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, LIT 295-02: Topic: Arab Women Writers (3) . Prerequisites: Completion of FDR FW writing requirement . An introduction to Arab women's issues through literary works by modern Arab writers that are available in English translation. Students read fiction, poetry, autobiographies, and short stories by Arab women writers from the Middle East and North Africa. We analyze these works within their social contexts to help students develop a critical understanding of the social, political, and cultural context(s) of these writings, and enhance cultural awareness through lectures, readings, and supplementary materials. (HL) Shehata .

Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division

LJS 232 - Simpson, Tammi R. / DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

Designed for students with an interest in law school and/or an interest in the history of civil rights. An exploration of civil rights in the United States from the post-reconstruction period, civil rights from an activists' perspective, the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, and civil litigation. The course includes a close examination of the work of the Civil Rights Division's Special Litigation Section which was instrumental in police misconduct matters involving, for example, the Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, police departments. We also examine the potential impact of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions' final memo regarding consent decrees and how it will affect investigations of police departments.

The Art of Mathematical Thinking: An Introduction to the Beauty and Power of Mathematical Ideas

MATH 100 - Finch-Smith, Carrie E.

Topics vary from term to term. Mathematics is a creative process whose artistic outcome is often a powerful tool for the sciences. This course gives you a new perspective into the world of mathematics while also developing your analytical reasoning skills.

Winter 2020, MATH 100-01: The Art of Mathematical Thinking: Introduction to Codes (3) . Students gain a new perspective into the world of mathematics while also developing their analytical and creative reasoning skills. In so doing, they gain an understanding of how theoretical results and concepts can be developed, used for problem-solving or for further investigation, and then how to clearly and coherently communicate their ideas and discoveries to others. In this section, students explore the use of and questions about the numbers and codes which are everywhere. You might have a driver's license number, a Social Security Number, a student identification number, a telephone number, credit-card numbers--the list goes on and on. If you're filing out a form and you're asked for an identification number, will anyone be able to tell right away if you've made up a number? If someone is typing your information into a computer, is there a way to make sure they haven't made any errors? How are credit-card numbers kept safe when we make online purchases? We discuss types of errors, algorithms for checking for errors, and some methods for encrypting information to keep it secure. The only skills needed to enter this course are arithmetic and intellectual curiosity. Students learn how to analyze algorithms and develop problem-solving skills throughout the course. (FM) Finch-Smith .

Spring 2020, MATH 100-01: The Art of Mathematical Thinking: Solving Puzzles and Games Using Mathematics (3). Any high school mathematics class is sufficient preparation for this material. Students gain a new perspective into the world of mathematics while also developing their analytical and creative reasoning skills. In so doing, they gain an understanding of how theoretical results and concepts can be developed, used for problem-solving or for further investigation, and then how to clearly and coherently communicate their ideas and discoveries to others. In this course, we focus on mathematical reasoning to analyze various puzzles and games, which then leads to figuring out how to increase our chances of winning. The springboard for our discussion comes from the answers to the following questions: 1) Is there a good way to predict the winner of a game before the game ends? 2) Is there a strategy that will improve a player's chance of winning a game? 3) Is the game fair? The answers depend on what we mean by good and fair. We start by carefully and precisely formulating environments in which we can discuss approaches to solving puzzles and playing games. Then, we contemplate criteria that capture the notions of goodness and fairness within these environments. Along the way, students learn the importance of precise definitions and consistent rules of logic in mathematical reasoning. (FM) Finch-Smith.

Fall 2019, MATH 100-01: The Art of Mathematical Thinking: The Mathematics of Politics (3). Students gain a new perspective into the world of mathematics while also developing their analytical and creative reasoning skills. In so doing, they gain an understanding of how theoretical results and concepts can be developed, used for problem-solving or for further investigation, and then how to clearly and coherently communicate their ideas and discoveries to others. In this course, we focus on mathematical reasoning about politics. What makes this course mathematical is not numbers or formulas but rather reasoning. Students must think about what is possible and what is impossible. Is there a good way to determine winners of elections? Is there a good way to apportion congressional seats? Is there a good way to make decisions in situations of conflict and uncertainty? We begin by carefully and precisely formulating environments in which we can discuss approaches to elections, apportionment, and rational decision-making. We contemplate criteria that capture the notions of goodness within these environments, and see importance of precise definitions and consistent rules of logic in mathematical reasoning. Throughout the course, we pay attention to the way that technical words are defined so that the precise technical meaning is not confused with the ordinary meaning that the word carries in natural language. (FM) Finch-Smith.
 
Fall 2019, MATH 100-02: The Art of Mathematical Thinking: The Mathematics of Politics (3). Students gain a new perspective into the world of mathematics while also developing their analytical and creative reasoning skills. In so doing, they gain an understanding of how theoretical results and concepts can be developed, used for problem-solving or for further investigation, and then how to clearly and coherently communicate their ideas and discoveries to others. In this course, we focus on mathematical reasoning about politics. What makes this course mathematical is not numbers or formulas but rather reasoning. Students must think about what is possible and what is impossible. Is there a good way to determine winners of elections? Is there a good way to apportion congressional seats? Is there a good way to make decisions in situations of conflict and uncertainty? We begin by carefully and precisely formulating environments in which we can discuss approaches to elections, apportionment, and rational decision-making. We contemplate criteria that capture the notions of goodness within these environments, and see importance of precise definitions and consistent rules of logic in mathematical reasoning. Throughout the course, we pay attention to the way that technical words are defined so that the precise technical meaning is not confused with the ordinary meaning that the word carries in natural language. (FM) Finch-Smith.

 

The Mathematics of Puzzles and Games

MATH 369 - Dymacek, Wayne M.

The application of mathematics to puzzles and games. A brief survey on the designs of tournaments. The puzzles and games include but are not limited to the Rubik's Cube, poker, blackjack, and peg solitaire.

Topics in Mathematics

MATH 383 - Bush, Michael R.

Readings and conferences for a student or students on topics agreed upon with the directing staff. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, MATH 383-01:Topic: The Mathematics of Information (4). Prerequisites: MATH 201 and 222 or instructor consent. The modern world runs on information. Huge numbers of bits (0s and 1s) are passing invisibly through the wires and air around you right now. These bits encode various types of data including text, pictures, audio/video signals etc. In 1948, a pioneering paper by Claude Shannon founded a new research area-- information theory--which, among other things, investigates the process of converting streams of symbols from one form to another and various associated questions that are still the focus of much modern research. For example, what is the most efficient way to go about encoding a stream of data so that it can be transmitted as quickly as possible over some channel or stored using a minimal amount of space? How can one build in redundancy so that errors due to noise (scratches on a CD/DVD, electromagnetic interference, etc.) can be detected and corrected? What should you do if privacy/secrecy is important? In this course, you will see how these sorts of questions can be formalized and addressed mathematically. Bush.

History Compounded: ExperienceEgypt

MESA 252 - Edwards, Anthony (Antoine)

An exploration of the social, religious, historical, and political foundations of the Arab Republic of Egypt. Based in Cairo, a.k.a. "Omm ed-Duniya (Mother of the World)", students study the complex dynamics of state, culture, and society from a historical perspective. This course uses multiple academic lenses to understand the manifold pasts, interpret the ever-changing present, and speculate about possible futures of contemporary Egypt.

Supervised Piano Accompanying

MUS 108 - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

A practical course in the skills of piano accompaniment, including sight reading, score reading, study of style, methods of expression, transposition, and rehearsal techniques. Students are expected to accompany solo vocalists and instrumentalists, play in chamber ensembles, or accompany the University choruses. A faculty member is assigned to coach and tutor the student. This course may be repeated.

Chamber Ensembles

MUS 112 - McArdle, Jaime H.

This course may be repeated. Small chamber groups consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists are created to perform music. 

Bluegrass Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform the traditional music of Appalachia in which improvisation is encouraged.

Brass Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for brass instruments in various combinations.

String Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for violin, viola, cello, and double bass in various combinations.

Woodwind Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for woodwind instruments in various combinations.

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141B - Carico, Shelby R.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141J - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141O - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Harper, Jesse J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Mason, Megan M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Wappel, Jaclyn M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141V - Parker, Gregory B. (Greg)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Perry, David T.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Murphy, Erin J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds.  A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

 

The Music, Folklore, and Literature of Ireland

MUS 238 - Dobbins, Christopher L. (Chris) / Conner, Marc C.

This course engages the music, folklore and literature of Ireland and the ways that the creation of these art forms is related to the places in which the art was created. We cover a wide variety of the history of Irish art and focus on the importance of place in the written, oral, and aural traditions of the island. Students study a range of musical compositions, styles, and traditions alongside the rich body of Irish folklore and folk customs that underlie these musical creations, as well as the rich literature that informs all of these artistic efforts. After the first week on campus, the remainder of the course takes place in Dingle in the West of Ireland and in Dublin.

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Harper, Jesse J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Mason, Megan M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Wappel, Jaclyn M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241V - Parker, Gregory B. (Greg)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Perry, David T.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Murphy, Erin J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. ($360 lesson fee)

Music in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

MUS 285 - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

How does music add power and meaning to a film? What are the connections between the flow of music and the flow of a dramatic narrative? How does music enhance visual images? The course will focus on the pre-existent classical compositions chosen by Stanley Kubrick for his movies 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980). The ability to read music is not a requirement for this course.

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341P - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341P - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341S - Harper, Jesse J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341S - Mason, Megan M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341V - Parker, Gregory B. (Greg)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341W - Perry, David T.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341W - Murphy, Erin J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341W - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. A limit of nine credits for nonmajors and 12 credits for majors in applied music courses (140s, 240s, 340s, 440s) is allowable toward a degree. Available in brass, composition, jazz improvisation, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. A music major is entitled to one applied music course per term without charge. Special departmental permission is required for students wanting two-credit applied music courses. ($360 lesson fee)

Directed Individual Research

NEUR 423 - Brindle, Ryan C.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a neuroscience faculty member by prior mutual agreement. Consult with individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be carried out during the summer. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits may apply towards the major.

Therapeutic Exercise

PE 102 - Williamson, Joshua D.

A specialized course employing physical rehabilitation techniques. Students with an acute physical impairment are assigned through consultation with the University physician in lieu of other physical education courses. May be repeated twice (three credits) toward degree requirements.

Aerobic Swimming

PE 111 - Gardner, Kateri A. (Kami) / LaBerge, Logan E.

A course designed to improve stroke technique and endurance.  Not to be taken after completing PE 205 or 213. May be taken once.

Aerobic Swimming

PE 111 - Ellis, Paul M.

A course designed to improve stroke technique and endurance.  Not to be taken after completing PE 205 or 213. May be taken once.

Golf

PE 151 - Gyscek, Peter J. / Carralero, Kelsie A.

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall, 2nd six-weeks in winter, and spring. Golf. Not to be taken after completing PE 209. Course fee: $100 and must provide own transportation. (If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Freeman, Dana L.

Aerobic running. Not to be taken after completing PE 200 or 212.

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Dager, Michael J. (Mike)

Aerobic running. Not to be taken after completing PE 200 or 212.

Weight Training

PE 155 - Koch, Eric M. / Foxx, Deshon C.

Weight Training

Weight Training

PE 155 - White, Theodore W. (Ted) / Franklin, Eric N.

Weight Training

Team Sports

PE 157 - Spalding, Brandon P.

This course involves basketball, volleyball, and soccer which will take up three quarters of the course. The fourth component will be any combination of team games/sports from the following: Team Handball, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, kickball, and other games. Students will learn the fundamentals of each sport, including how to play and officiate.

Team Sports

PE 157 - Clancy, Christine K.

This course involves basketball, volleyball, and soccer which will take up three quarters of the course. The fourth component will be any combination of team games/sports from the following: Team Handball, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, kickball, and other games. Students will learn the fundamentals of each sport, including how to play and officiate.

Tennis

PE 158B - Detwiler, David A. / Churchill, Samuel R. (Sam)

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall and spring. Beginning and intermediate tennis. Students may take this course only once regardless of level. Not to be taken after completing PE 211.

Tennis

PE 158I - Ness, Erin G. / Barrett, Hailey

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall and spring. Beginning and intermediate tennis. Students may take this course only once regardless of level. Not to be taken after completing PE 211.

Badminton

PE 159 - LeRose, Garrett M. / Rohde, Ryan H.

Badminton

Badminton

PE 159 - Shearer, Nathan W. / McHugh, Christopher D., Jr. (Chris)

Badminton

Mountain Biking

PE 176 - Dick, James

Mountain Biking. (Additional fee required. If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Scuba

PE 185 - Dick, James

An introduction to the underwater world of SCUBA Diving, including classroom, pool-session, and open-water components. Students learn about dive equipment, the science of diving, responsible diving practices, and the environment. Practice time enhances students' safety and comfort and training is completed with a minimum of five open-water dives. Successful completion results in lifetime open-water diver certification from NAUI, www.naui.com. Diving instruction is provided by Nags Head Diving of Manteo, North Carolina. (Additional fee required. If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Sports Psychology

PE 306 - Singleton, Michael J. (Mike)

An examination of both theory and application of sport psychology. Students gain an understanding of the psychological principles and theories that apply to sport and learn how to use this knowledge in an applied setting when working with teams or athletes. Major areas of focus include personality theory, attribution theory, group cohesion, imagery, goal orientation and motivation, goal setting, and imagery.

Medicine, Research, and Poverty

PHIL 247 - Taylor, Erin P.

This seminar introduces students to central ethical issues in the provision of medical care and the conduct of medical research in the context of poverty. Specific topics include medical research on prisoners and the indigent; ancillary care obligations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); meeting the standard of care in LMICs; access to essential medicines; allocation of scarce medical resources; and compensated donation for organs or tissues.

Seminar in Ethics and Value Theory

PHIL 296 - Weissman, Jeremy L.

A consideration of selected issues in philosophy. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, PHIL 296-01: Seminar in Ethics and Value Theory: Ethics and Emerging Technologies (3). By some accounts, technology is the defining aspect of modern society that shapes how we experience the world. At the same time, technology is accelerating at a pace that challenges our ability to take stock of the ethical issues at hand. In this seminar, we take a critical look at a number of cutting-edge technologies that are still largely on the horizon and attempt to decipher the ethical issues they present and how such problems might be mitigated. Some emerging technologies we critically analyze include artificial intelligence, human enhancement, virtual reality, surveillance technologies, synthetic biology, self-driving cars, and killer robots. (HU) Weissman.

Stellar Evolution and Cosmology

PHYS 151 - Sukow, David W.

Appropriate for non-science majors. An introduction to the physics and astronomy of stellar systems and the universe. Topics include the formation and lifecycle of stars, stellar systems, galaxies, and the universe as a whole according to "Big Bang" cosmology. Observational aspects of astronomy are also emphasized, including optics and telescopes, star maps, and knowledge of constellations. Geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and logarithms are used in the course. Laboratory course with fee.

Black Mirror

POL 271 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

Through a critical engagement with the television series "Black Mirror", this course is intended to help students understand and think critically about how various technologies are actively shaping what it means - and what it might mean in the future - to be human, live a good life, and act as a socio-political agent. We examine some of the central questions and themes presented in each episode through supplementary readings drawn from various fields, including political philosophy, literature, science fiction, and journalism. Topics include technology's impact on romantic and family relationships, social surveillance and punishment, and political leadership, among others.

Intelligence in Practice

POL 276 - Cantey, Joseph M., Jr. (Seth)

Not open to those who have already taken POL 278 and precludes future enrollment in POL 278. An examination of the responsibilities of, and challenges faced by, the U.S. intelligence community (IC). Drawing on current literature and case studies, topics include the history and evolution of the IC, the intelligence cycle, ethical and moral issues, oversight and accountability, covert action, and intelligence reform. Through an intelligence lens, we explore the rise of al Qaeda, 9/11 and its aftermath, successes and failures associated with the Iraq War, Russian efforts to sway the 2016 US presidential election, and more.

Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts

POL 290 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

In this course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. The topic is announced at registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Only one such seminar may be counted towards the politics major.

Spring 2019, POL 290-01: Politics and Culture: Seminar in Politics, Literature, and the Arts (3). Prerequisite: POL 100. In this American politics course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We explore the interplay between politics and culture from William Shakespeare's King Lear to Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, with a particular focus on the role of political humor in reflecting and molding political mores and opinions. Movies include Casablanca and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. Political science texts supplement the artistic sources assigned. (SS2) Connelly.

Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts

POL 290 - Ponce de Leon Seijas, Zoila

In this course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. The topic is announced at registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Only one such seminar may be counted towards the politics major.

Spring 2020, POL 290-02: Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts: Dystopian Fiction, Horror, and Politics (3). An examination of the political commentary included in dystopian fiction and horror novels and films. Through the analysis of seminal novels such as 1984 and Brave New World, and more recent films such as US, students assess different political concepts, including power, government, freedom, and equality. Literature and film can offer the most mesmerizing yet frightening depictions of our present and future world. At the same time, they can provide us with the opportunity to critically compare our contemporary experiences to those portrayed in them. Our main goal is to critically assess the role of the government and powerful actors in our society. We complement our analysis with a variety of academic readings and opinion pieces. (SS2) Ponce de Leon.

Spring-Term Topics in Public Policy

POL 294 - Harris, Rebecca C.

This course is designed to give students additional expertise and awareness of discrete policy challenges in the United States. Students learn to explain current policy systems, including political institutions and political behavior by political actors. Students also formulate policy evaluations acknowledging the strengths and the weaknesses in the policy system.

Spring 2020, POL 294-01: Spring-Term Topics in Public Policy: Food Policy (3) . Prerequisite: POL 100 or instructor consent. Students with interest in or majoring in politics, economics, business, environmental studies, public health, or poverty are encouraged to take the course.  An introduction to the institutions and politics of U.S. food, nutrition, and farm policy. Major considerations include farm and food-policy history, USDA policy tools, and political issues.  Specific topics focus on the farm bill (economics and conservation), poverty and nutrition programs, and food-industry regulation. Students engage in a community-based research project working with Rockbridge County Extension Office on current nutrition programming. (SS2) Harris.

 

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - Blick, Andrew

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, POL 296-02: Topic in Global Politics: Comparative Constitution-Making (3). This course introduces students to how a constitution is formed. Constitution-building processes have played a critical part in the history of many countries, including the USA, Spain, and Germany. Often they marked an important break with the past, leaving behind authoritarian rule or colonial government. Constitution-building may take place in the wake of traumatic events such as military defeat or revolutionary upheaval. It can have powerful consequences-both good and ill-for the future of the country in which it takes place. Through historical analysis, case studies, and international comparison, students will investigate different processes of creating a constitution. (SS2) Blick.

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob) / Settle, Frank A., Jr.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, POL 296-03: Topic in Global Politics: Avoiding Armagedon:The Politics and Science of Nonproliferation  (3) . Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. This course, team-taught by a political scientist and a chemist, introduces students to complex technical and political issues connected to the proliferation of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and the possibilities that such weapons could be used by rogue nations or terrorist groups. Students are expected to design a realistic terrorist attack involving weapons of mass destruction (WMD), engage in the debate over whether nuclear proliferation might make the world safer, and propose a specific policy proposal for enhancing global security in the age of WMD proliferation. (SS2) Strong, Settle.

Directed Individual Study

POL 401 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Washington Term Program

POL 466 - Alexander, Brian N.

The Washington Term Program aims to enlarge students' understanding of national politics and governance. Combining academic study with practical experience in the setting of a government office, think tank, or other organization in Washington, it affords deeper insight into the processes and problems of government at the national level. A member of the politics faculty is the resident director, supervising students enrolled in this program while they are in Washington, D.C.

Medicine, Research, and Poverty

POV 247 - Taylor, Erin P.

This seminar introduces students to central ethical issues in the provision of medical care and the conduct of medical research in the context of poverty. Specific topics include medical research on prisoners and the indigent; ancillary care obligations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); meeting the standard of care in LMICs; access to essential medicines; allocation of scarce medical resources; and compensated donation for organs or tissues.

Special Topics in Poverty Studies

POV 296 - Pickett, Howard Y.

An intensive, in-depth examination of particular thinkers, approaches, policies or debates in the field of poverty and human capability studies.

Spring 2020, POV 296-01: Special Topics in Poverty Studies: Justice and Mercy: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives (4). Prerequisite: POV 101. This interdisciplinary community-based seminar takes place at Augusta Correctional Center in Craigsville, Virginia (approximately 35 miles from Lexington), a level-3 (out of 6) medium-security state prison. W&L undergraduates attend class with inmates who are pursuing higher education while in custody at the center. Our focus is mainly on questions related to justice and forgiveness as they relate to governmental/political injustices and atrocities (e.g., the Holocaust, white supremacy, colonialism). (HU) Howard Pickett .

Special Topics in Religion

REL 195 - Chalmers, Matthew J.

A course offered from time to time in a selected problem or topic in religion. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, REL 195-01: From Anti-Judaism to Anti-Semitism (3). In this course, we encounter and analyze the forms and histories of anti-Jewishness. The course tracks from Judaeophobia in the ancient world to anti-Semitism in the contemporary world, with a focus on three moments: first, the Mediterranean world at the birth of Christian empire; second, the Holocaust in historical and ideological context; and third, anti-Semitism in America, from Henry Ford's anti-Semitic conspiracy theories to the Pittsburgh Tree of Life shooting. In the process we ask some hard questions. What is the connection between anti-Semitism and racial thought? What is the difference between anti-Semitism and anti-Judaism? How does Christian religion intersect with anti-Semitism? How have Jewish people responded to hostility and attack, and how has suffering and loss been memorialized? (HU) Chalmers.

Meditation and Self-Knowledge

REL 333 - Lubin, Timothy (Tim)

For 2,500 years, Hindus and Buddhists have promoted meditation as a means to attain insight and liberation from suffering, a state sometimes understood in terms of divinity or Buddha-nature. Meditation has also been adopted by some in the West during the last century, often for psychological or physical benefits apart from any devotional context. What had traditionally been a practice of ordained monks was popularized in the West, a trend that then caught on in Asia as well. We look at the origins of meditative practices in Asian traditions using primary sources, social context, and personal experience of basic meditative techniques. The course concludes by noting that some contemporary neuroscientists are looking to meditation to better understand mind, brain, emotion, and cognition.

Spring Term Abroad in Romance Languages

ROML 297 - Bailey, Matthew J. / Pinto-Bailey, Ana C. (Cristina)

A spring-term abroad topics course in which the language of instruction is English, while students also study the language of the host country (French, Spanish, Italian or Portuguese). The course topic is an intensive cultural study related to one of the societies that speak Romance Languages, with an emphasis on experiential learning. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, ROML 297-01: Spring Term Abroad in Romance Languages: Walking the Portuguese Caminho de Santiago (4). Experiential Learning. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. Fitness compatible with 12 consecutive days of 10-14-mile walks. Students study the Portuguese route to Santiago (Sant Iago) and then walk the 143 miles (230 kilometers) from Porto to Santiago de Compostela, to the shrine of St. James the Greater, brother of John the Apostle. The first week is spent on campus where students study the route and its cultural history, choose individual study projects related to the towns and cities along the route, create a digital map of the route, and study the Portuguese language. The walk is divided into twelve stages, averaging a demanding 12 miles per day. The trip includes three nights in Lisbon, one night in Porto, and three nights in Santiago de Compostela. (HU). Bailey and Pinto-Bailey.

Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

SOAN 211 - Gaylord, Donald A.

Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological lab methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students process and catalogue archaeological finds ensuring they maintain the archaeological provenience of these materials. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop and test hypotheses about the site under consideration by analyzing the artifacts they themselves have processed. We visit several archaeology labs in order to experience, first hand, the range of projects and methods currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students then use the archaeological data to test their hypotheses and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.

A World of Data: Baseball and Statistics

SOAN 220 - Eastwood, Jonathan R. (Jon) / Kosky, Jeffrey L.

An introduction to the world of data and data analysis, emphasizing Bayesian methods. Taking the case of contemporary sports, with a particular focus on baseball, it teaches students how to build models of player performance while also asking important questions about the limitations of such approaches to human activities. What is gained and lost in the world made by measuring human actions in reliable ways? How is our experience in the world--in this case as athletes playing and spectators living sports--affected when we see it in terms of statistics and predictive models? What interests and what concerns make up our lives when we engage the world in this way? What interests and concerns may be obscured? The course offers a rare opportunity to acquire some expertise in producing data-driven knowledge and decisions while also reflecting on what it is like to be a non-expert living in the world shaped by such expertise.

Peoples of Central Europe Through Literature and Film

SOAN 225 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

This course provides basic information about the citizens of Central European nations of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Beliefs, attitudes, and value systems of the people of Central Europe are examined against the backdrop of major historical events of the 20th century.  Core textbook readings are supplemented by feature films, video materials, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry.  Class discussions focus on interpreting these works of art in the context of comparative historical-sociological analysis of the Polish, Czech, and Hungarian cultures and societies.

Adolescence Under the Microscope

SOAN 281 - Novack, David R. / Novack, Lesley L.

This course focuses on adolescence through the lens of social psychology. Insights from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are employed to explicate the adolescent experience in the United States in contrast to other societies. Topics include: the impact of liminality on adolescent identity in cross-cultural perspective; adolescence as objective reality or cultural fiction; adolescence and peer relations, gender and suicide; and new technologies and virtual adolescence. Each student engages in a research project focusing on adolescence and identity through either interviews or observational techniques. The final project is a group analysis of adolescence as reflected in Facebook.

Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History

SOAN 286 - Markowitz, Harvey J. / Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi ) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.

Special Topics in Sociology

SOAN 290 - Perez, Marcos E.

A discussion of a series of topics of sociological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, SOAN 290-01: Topic: Global Urban Sociology (3). An exploration of the complexities of city life in an increasingly globalized world, focusing on three broad topics. First, we examine the challenges caused by urbanization in both developed and developing societies: how to provide basic services for urban residents, avoid environmental degradation, and mitigate poverty, inequality, and violence. Second, we discuss the economic role that cities have played during different historical periods. Third, we consider how urban life may change in the future, looking especially at technology and climate change. Perez .

 

Special Topics in Anthropology

SOAN 291 - Bell, Alison K.

A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, SOAN 291-01: Domains of The Dead: Anthropologies of Cemeteries (4). This course teaches students how to think anthropologically about cemeteries, querying them in theory-grounded, systematic, testable ways for information about past and current people's social relations, cultural dispositions, values, beliefs, and aspirations. Assigned readings expose students to key theoretical texts from the anthropology of death and mourning as well as to historical surveys of cemeteries as they vary throughout the United States. Of special interest in the course is the recently documented proliferation of idiosyncratic forms of commemoration diverging considerably from previous centuries of more somber practice. Examples of this florescence and of its more restrained predecessors abound in the Valley of Virginia, and students investigate first-hand a range of cemeteries in Rockbridge, Augusta, and Rockingham Counties. Students record decorative motifs and epitaphs on gravestones as well as objects left on gravesites and work to read them as evidence of cultural expression and change. (SS4) A. Bell.

Special Topics in Anthropology

SOAN 291 - Rainville, Lynn

A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2020, SOAN 291-02: Artifacts, Maps, & Archives: An Ethno-Historic Approach to W&L's Past (3).  Applying interdisciplinary methods to study four centuries of W&L material culture and historic records. We use these items to uncover additional stories about W&L founders, its evolving curriculum, and buildings. We visit multiple collections of art, ceramics, artifacts, and documents on campus, and walk several miles across on- and off-campus historic landscapes, including local graveyards. Students synthesize this material and produce several deliverables: (1) additional historic layers to the online campus map (campusmap.wlu.edu); (2) a poster for the term-ending Spring Festival; and (3) biographical sketches of under-studied members of the W&L community. Rainville.

Seminar: 9/11 & Modern Terrorism

SOAN 367 - Senechal, Roberta H.

Terrorism is a form of collective violence famously illustrated in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon near Washington on September 11, 2001. This course provides an intensive interdisciplinary examination of the origins of the 9/11 attacks and the terrorist organization that launched them. The course also addresses the impact of the attacks and the future prospects of mass violence against civilians, as well as the role of the media in covering (and dramatizing) terrorism. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), the logic of terrorist recruitment, and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction.

Contemporary Spain in Context: (Re)searching Spanish Identity and Culture in the 21st Century

SPAN 214 - Reyes, Antonio

This course examines contemporary social issues in Spain through lectures and interviews with local subjects in Spain. Lectures provide a formal understanding of contemporary Spanish society, while interviews of local subjects provide data for further analysis by the students that may challenge, complement or further develop their understanding of current social issues.

Living on the Edge: Identities in Motion in Argentina and Uruguay

SPAN 216 - Michelson, Seth R.

Conducted in Spanish in Argentina and Uruguay, this course comprises a study of Argentine culture, language, and identity. Students live in Buenos Aires with Spanish-speaking families while pursuing coursework on identity in local, national, and international contexts. What does geography have to do with identity? How might a nation redefine its policies and peoples over time? Where does the line exist between an economic system and its individual constituents? And what insights can art offer into domestic and international conflict? This course engages such questions through the study of Argentine historiography, literature, economics, and art. Coursework is accentuated by visits to sites of cultural importance in Argentina and Uruguay, including museums, banks, literary presses, political centers, meat markets, parks, and tango houses.

Special Effects for Theater

THTR 236 - Collins, Owen

In this hands-on, project-based course, students apply the process of iterative design and use critical thinking to provide creative solutions to solve the artistic effects required to tell stories in theater. Starting with textual analysis of given scripts, students develop the parameters required for various effects, figure out a process to create those effects, and make them.

Total Theater

THTR 239 - Mish, Robert W.

A practical study of design, directing, production and acting problems in a specific style of dramatic literature, culminating in a public theatrical production.

Shakespeare in Performance: Supervised Study in Great Britain

THTR 286 - Levy, Jemma A. / Pickett, Holly C.

Experiential Learning. An interdisciplinary study of Shakespeare in performance in Stratford-upon-Avon and London, England. In Stratford, students attend the performances of the Royal Shakespeare Company and participate in programming and workshops with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. In London, students experience shows and workshops at the Globe Theatre, as well as other venues. Students analyze Shakespeare from both literary and theatrical perspectives, experiencing the differences in watching/hearing, reading, and performing Shakespeare's texts.